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November 07, 1962 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-11-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE. MICHIGAN it A Ii.V

liT.irslm lV T1. i rs a"ws"ww iv::. . .... . .a.

s as ___________________________lea_____________--t.' ., n i - Hu i-a a H j L W EDNSDA

Y, NOVEMBER 7, 1962

I'

PASSER ROARS OFF BENCH:
Chandler Justifies Promotion

I

PUT THE BOUNCE BACK
'INTO HIS STEP.
give him
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breathin' brushed pigskin by Wolverine
from 95
He'll love their carefree, breezy looks, their light-as-air
casualness (they weigh only 12 ounces each), and the
way they shrug off dirt and water. So easy to keep clean,
too. A -simple brushing does it. Comes with springy
crepe sole, steel shank support. Sizes and widths to fit
everybody.

By. JIM BERGER
It was second down and 11 yds.
to go on the Wisconsin 48 when
Michigan quarterback Bob Chand-
ler dropped back to pass late in
the first period last Saturday.
Bob Timberlake, Michigan's con-
verted halfback, was open and the
play was good for 35 yds. to the
Wisconsin 13. Three plays later,
Dave Raimey crossed the goal line,
and Michigan Stadium went wild.
The Wolverines, scoreless in
three Big Ten games, were leading
the Badgers, 12-7.
- *' *
As was expected, Michigan lost
to Wisconsin. The final score was
34-12. The superior Badger line
wore Michigan down and scored
20 points in the final quarter.
However, Michigan finally show-
ed an offense, and Coach Bump
Elliott finally found a quarterback.
Vied with Glinka
Chandler started his college ca-
reer two years ago. He and Dave
Glinka, both sophomores, were vie-
ing for quarterback. In the second
game of the season at Michigan
State, Chandler was successfully
moving Michigan when he was
dropped by a jarring tackle and
carried off the field.
Chandler was out with a knee
injury. "It was as bad a knee in-
jury as you can get," said A. W.
Coxan, M.D., Michigan team phy-
sician. "He completely tore the
ligament, and surgery was neces-;
sary. It is very similiar to (John)+
Houtman's and Glinka's injuries
this season," Dr. Coxan said.
The sophomore from LaGrange,
Ill., was granted another year of+
eligibility, but last year was any-
thing but successful for him. The

FINALLY GETS CHANCE-Bob Chandler, junior quarterback,
who is at last a solid starter after two years of waiting, is shown
here completing a pass to one of his predecessors at quarter-
back, Bob Timberlake. This was one of the 11 passes he com-
pleted out of 18 attempts in Saturday's losing effort against
Wisconsin. -

6'3" 199 lb. signalcaller spent said Chandler. "I worked on the
most of his time on the Michigan docks in Chicago during the sum-
bench. His major accomplishment mer and also worked out with my
was the completion of a picture high school team."
touchdown bomb to Bob Brown n For the Wolverines, the season
the Army game. has been just one humiliation aft-
er another with the exception of
Army. Elliott couldn't muster any
kind of an offense. In the Minne-
sota game, Chandler came in late
in the game and moved the Wol-
verines to their furthest penetra-
tion in three Conference games.
'Gave Me Confidence'

BOB CHANDLER
... new star at helm

"Playing as much as I did in
the Minnesota game gave me some
of the confidence I needed,"
Chandler said. "I never had much
game experience and it helped me
quite a bit."
Elliott was also pleased with
Chandler's performance against
the Gophers. "Bob moved the team
well, and although I don't doubt
that in that stage of the game
another of our quarterbacks could
have done as well, I think it gave
Bob the confidence he needed."
Rewarded . . .
Chandler was rewarded by get-
ting the starting role against Wis-
consin last Saturday, and after
two discouraging years, Chandler
was finally given the chance to
prove himself.
The results justified Elliott's de-
cision. He passed 18 times and
completed 11 for 120 yds. Twice,
he set up Michigan scores with
passes. His toss to sophomore Jim
Conley for 16 yds. set up Michi-
gan's, first, and ,the Timberlake
pass set up the second.
"I got very good protection,"
said Chandler. "I think it was the
best protection any quarterback
has gotten all year."

Chandler is and always has been
primarily a passer. "I never ran
much in high school," said Chand-
ler. "My coach was a Northwest-
ern man and we used a split-T of-
fense with emphasis on passing.
It is sort of like our pro-type ot-
fense at Michigan."
As for the knee, it is fully re-
covered, but Chandler still has it
taped for games and practices. "I
kept it taped last year because I
didn't think it was fully recovered.
I keep it taped now as a safety
precaution."
Elliott is pleased with Chandler.
"Bob played well last Saturday and
we are counting ton him against
Illinois."
After two up-hill years, number
20, Bob 'Chandler has finally
emerged as Michigan's number one
quarterback.
NU Retains
TOpRanking;
USC Second
a
By The Associated Press
If the Rose Bowl were played
tomorrow, it would be a match for
the unofficial national title be-
tween the !irst and second ranked
teams in this week's Associated
Press college football poll--North-
western and Southern California.
Along the same line, the third
and fourth ranked teams are in
line for berths in the Sugar Bowl,
as Alabama and Mississippi occupy
those spots.
The only two teams in the top
ten which were able to retain
their ratings of last week after a
weekend of upsets were North-
western and fifth-ranked Texas.
Thetop ten teams, with first
place votes and season records
WLTPts

A

1962
WORLD'S FAIR

CAMPUS ST' SHOP

Union-

619 E. Liberty

NO 2-0266

November 16, 17

SPORTS SHORTS:
Dayton Star
Quits School
DAYTON ) - Dayton an-
nounced that Bill Chmielewski,
6'10" pivot *man on the Flyers'
basketball team, had withdrawn
from school because of financial
problems.
Chmielewski, one of the star'
players mentioned in early season
as a possible All-American, met
with coach Tom Blackburn Tues-
day morning. The youth agreed to
consider the matter a few more
hours and announced his decision
in the afternoon.
A spokesman for Blackburn said
the 20-year-old, 235-pound junior
rrom Detroit gave no specific fea-
son for his decision to drop out of
school but indicated he was wor-
ried about financial problems. His
wife is expecting a child.
L * * W
LOS ANGELES (AP)--Bob Water-

"I just wasn't ready last year,"
said Chandler. "I favored the knee,
and I just didn't realize the ex-
tent of my injury.
"After the injury, the thought
of giving up football went through
my mind because I never felt I was
going to play. I was quite dis-
couraged."
At the start of this season,
things looked brighter for Chand-
ler. Michigan would be counting
on him for his passing ability.
"I thought I was in pretty good
shape when the season began,"

,,I

11

SCOUTING REPORT-ILLINOIS:
Daring Ilni Loom Dangerous

Join the parad
to A Arbor
Special checking acc
money orders and tra
checks are only a few
services you'll find des
to serve your studentI
ing needs.

le
BankT
ounts,
velers
of the
igned
bank-

I

field resigned yesterday as head
coach of the oft-losing Los An-
geles Rams.
Waterfield, longtime star quar-
terback of the club but unable to
win as a coach, said in a state-
ment:
"I met with (General Manager)
Elroy Hirsch, and after much
thought I have decided to re-
sign-.. .
"I think it will be best for all
concerned u n d e r the circum-
stances. I want to wish the ball
club and the staff the best for
the remainder of the season."
ST. LOUIS (P)-Branch Rickey's
proposal to retire St. Louis Card-
inal outfielder Stan Musial is the
apparent cause of a major dis-
agreement with baseball Cardinal
general manager Bing Devine.
Club president August A. Busch
Jr. said yesterday that Stan Musial
not only will play with the Card-
inals in 1963 but Musial will be-
come a Cardinal vice president
when he decides to retire.
"That is hard .to believe because
both Bing and Johnny Keane said
they were counting on me. I won't
retire. Not in the good shape I'm
in. If the Cardinals don't want me,
I know some other clubs that do,"
Musial said

By STAN KUKLA
In the closing minutes of last
Saturday's game, the Purdue Boil-
ermakers found themselves on the
short end of a 14-10 score in their
contest with the Illinois Orange
and Blue.
The Illini were forced to punt
with the clock showing three min-
utes left to play. Quarterback Mike
Taliaferro's punt was short and
the Boilermakers had the ball at
the mid-field stripe. After three
plays, Ron DiGravio was faced
with a fourth-and-fifteen situa-
tion. He faded back to pass, saw
that his receivers were covered,
with the hard-charging Illini line
bearing down on him.
Suddenly . . . An Opening
Suddenly he saw an opening and
cut down the center of the field.
He was hit but managed to pull
away and rail the ball all the way
to the 16-yd. line, for a first down
and a possible score.
After three plays, DiGravio
again found himself in the same
position. It was fourth and not a
few yards to go. Again he faded
back to pass. Again his receivers
were covered. This time he didn't
get away. The Illini line had him
i ntheir sights and he was pulled
down. With 30 seconds to go, the
Illini had the ball, the lead, and
the victory.
That episode typifies the "new"
Illinois football team according to
Don Dufek, Michigan freshman
coach, who scouted the Illinois-
Purdue game.
"They've been improving stead-

ily all along," he said. "Their de-
fense has improved a lot lately.
They've gotten quite tough, really.,
"It was Illinois' daring plays,
though, that actually gave them
the victory," Dufek stated posi-
tively.;
Facts Agree
The fact's seemed to bear him
out. A Boilermaker punt was kill-
ed on the Illini three. The normal
call for a team in a situation like
this is a running play.
But the Illini team, run by Tali-
aferro, isn't conventional.
Taliaferro faded back into the
end zone-and connected on a 39-
yd. pass play.
Dufek cites Taliaferro's passing
as a factor in the downing of Pur-
due. He passed for a total of 199
yds. Saturday to bring his season's
total to 796 yds.
The main target of his passes
was senior end Thurman Walker.
Walker snagged four of Taliafer-
ro's passes for a total of 90 yds.,
and scored a touchdown.

The Illinois offense features a.
passing attack as its main weapon
but the running of Ken Zimmer-
man, senior halfback, who, ac-
cording to Dufek, is "neither fast
nor shifty," gives defensive lines
another worry.
"Zimmerman has given the l-
lini leadership and fire," com-
mented Dufek.
Gives 100 Per Cent
"When Zimmerman is in there,
he gives 100 per cent;" Dufek con-
tinued to exult. "He's not especial-
ly fast or powerful-he only weighs
178-but when he gets going he is
hard to stop."
Dufek thinks that the Illini have
improved the most on defense.
"Their line seems to know what
they're doing. They mix up the
plays, stunting, etc. They are real
hard charging."
The Illini will be no pushover
for the Wolverines this Saturday
- afterall, they beat Purdue,
didn't they?

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

Northwestern (24)
So. Calif. (6)
Alabama (9)
Mississippi (9)
Texas (1)
Arkansas
Missouri
Wisconsin
Louisiana State

6
6
7
6
6
6
6
5
5

0
0.
0,
0
0:
1
0.
1+
1;

0
0
0
0
1
0
1
0
1

vote

442
409
397
372
278
179
146
118
102

GRI'D SELECTIONS
Enter this week's Grid Picks contest and gain the right to win
two free tickets to the Michigan Theatre and a subscription to the
Football News. All you have to do is pick up an entry blank at The
Daily Building, 420 Maynard -Street, and deposit it in the box pro-
vided on the second floor.
THIS WEEK'S GAMES

The others: Penn State, Oregon,
Georgia T e c h, Miami (Fla.),
Washington, Army, Dartmouth,
Auburn, Oklahoma, Florida, UCLA,
Kansas, Michigan State, Oregon
State, Arizona State, West Vir-
ginia.
DiGravioi
HurtsA
CHICAGO (P) -- Star quarter-
back Ron Di Gravio of Purdue
may miss Saturday's Big Ten
football game at Michigan State
because of an ankle injury suffer-
ed in a freak practice mishap.
Boilermaker coach Jack Mollen-
kopf, in a phone report from Laf-
ayette, Ind., told the Chicago
Football Writers yesterday that Di
Gravio's right ankle was hurt as
he held up a tackling dummy and
another player fell over him.
'M', Gymnasts
To Hold' Show
Gymnastics Coach Newt Loken
announced yesterday that there
will be an intra-squad gymnastics
exhibition tonight at 7:30= in the
gymnasium.
There is no admission charge.
Loken also said that the 'pro-
rmgram will include a judo exhibi-
tion by international experts and
a session to explain the sport

on

1. Illinois at MICHIGAN (score)
2. Purdue at Michigan State
3. Iowa at Minnesota
4. Indiana at Ohio State
5. Northwestern at Wisconsin
6. Pittsburgh at Notre Dame
7. Cornell at Brown
8. Harvard at Princeton
9. Texas Tech at Boston College
10. Florida St. at Georgia Tech

11. Navy at Syracuse
12. West Virginia at Penn State
13. Miami (Fla.) at Alabama
14. Mississippi State at Auburn
15. Maryland at Duke
16. N. Carolina St. at S. Carolina
17. Nebraska at Kansas
18. Texas A&M at, So. Methodist
19. Air Force at UCLA
20. So. California at Stanford

Better Off Out

What is NSA?
In the preamble to its constitution, the United States National

DANCE TO THE ARISTOCRATS
ENJOY THE FRIARS
SEE THE NEW '63 CARS

Student Association

(USNSA) claims to be a "National Union of

Students."

This "national union," however, contains within

its

membership only one-fourth o.f the United States college and univer-
sity students; and only 17% of this country's institutions of higher
learning.
As a union. of students, NSA should naturally concern itself
with student affairs. Its constitution states that, "Nobody acting
on behalf of NSA . . . shall take part in activities which do not
affect students in their role as students." The organization has, at
its most recent summer conferences, however, concerned itself with
such issues as Red China, Algeria, U. S. foreign aid, the House

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