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November 07, 1962 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1962-11-07

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'4:00 A.M.
RESULTS

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Seventy-Two Years of Editorial Freedom
VOL. LXXIII, No. 46 ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 1962 SEVEN CENTS

EIGHT PAGES

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ation Vol
New York, Michigan
Republicans Elected
Incumbent Brown Edges Out Nixon
In California Gubernatorial Contest
By PHILIP SUTIN
The nation's voters retained the current political balance in
Congress, but numerous upsets marked yesterday's balloting.
Gov. Nelson Rockefeller of New York emerged as a leading.
GOP contender for the 1964 presidential nomination as Gov. Edmund
M. Brown apparently defeated former Vice-President Richard M.
Nixon and George Romney barely squeaked by Gov. John Swainson.
Democrats maintained control of the House and added seats to
their Senate majority. As of 3 a.m. today the House balance is 237
" Democrats to 163 Republicans
with 30 races undecided. Sixty-six
Democrats will face 34 Republicans
in next year's Senate.
Senate Gains
The gains in the Senate marked
the first reversal of the off-year
t end for the party in power to
lose Congressional seats and su-
cess in President John F. Ken-
nedy's campaign. President Frank-
lin D. Roosevelt was the last lead-
er to turn the trick as the 1934
Congress was more heavily Demo-
cratic than its 1932 predecessor.
Noting their gains, Democratic
National Chairman John Bailey
called the election "a great victory
for the Democrats."
The Democrats picked up one
governorship to extend their total
to a possible 21. At 3 a.m. the
Democrats had won 13, the Re-
SEN. THRUSON B. MORTON publicans 9 with six undecided.
early winner Nine governorships changed hands.
Easy Victory
f Rockefeller amassed a 500,000
City Select vote plurality over Democratic
an easy victory. Sen. Jacob Javits
RR-NY) was handily returned to
Republicans the Senate.
Nixon took an early lead to the
California counting, but Brown
By THOMAS HUNTER quickly recovered as city votes
Governor-elect George Romney rolled in, sending the former vice-
and his Republican party swept president to political oblivion.
through Ann Arbor and Washte- The election boosted Rep. Wil-
naw County as expected last liam Scranton (R-Penn) as a
night contender for the 1964 GOP presi-
Voters returned incumbent Rep. dential nomination. Scranton de-
George Meader (R) to Congress, feated Philadelphia Mayor Rich-
Sen. Stanley Thayer (R), Rep. ardson Dilworth.
Gilbert Bursley (R) of the First Clark Re-elected
district and Rep. James F. Warn- He also swept the Republican
er (R-Yysilanti) of the Second slate into office with exception of
district to the State Legislature. the Senate where Sen. Joseph
Theyalso gave a 6,000 vote edge to Clark was re-elected.
Republican congressman-at-large In Vermont, the Democrats
candidate Alvin Bentley. elected their first governor since
The local electorate followed the founding of the Republican
the national trend in setting what party. Philip H. Huff eked out
City Clerk Fred Looker called "a a narrow victory over incumbant
definite record for off-year vot- GOP Gov. F. Ray Keyser, Jr.
ing." With 59 precincts in, county The Democrats elected a gover-
Republicans took every position nor and a senator as a result of
on the ballot by margins of one- a Republican split in New Hamp-
third or better. In Ann Arbor the shire resulting from the death of
difference approached one-half, Sen. Styles Bridges. In mid-
especially for state officials. campaign incumbant retiring GOP
Vote Lag Gov. Wesley Powell came out for
Democratic Secretary of State emocrat John W. King, the win-
James M. Hare's 6,000 vote lagner.J n Pillsbury was the loser.
behind Republican Norman Stock- Own Upset
meyer was the closest a Democrat The GOP pulled an upset of its
could come. Romney's edge over own in Oklahoma, however, elect-
Gov. John B. Swainson mounted ing the first Republican governor
to 11,000 in the county. in the history of the state. Henry
Meader turned back Democrat C. Beilmon beat out P. "Wild Bill"
challenger Thomas Payne by Atkinson.
8,000 votes. Thayer beat Demo- Senatorial upsets included the
crat Prof. Robert Niess of the defeats of two venerable Republi-
French department with a 6,000 cans Sen. Alexander Wiley of Wis-
vote difference in the city and consin was apparently replaced by
Bursley edged Democrat Prof. outgoing Democratic Gov. Gaylord
Henry Bretton of the political Nelson and Sen. Homer Capehart
science department, gaining 4,000 was locked in a tight race with
votes in the city. former Democratic Speaker of the
The long term seat on the state House Birch E. Bayh, Jr.
supreme court in the non-partisan Swing Election

balloting went to Michael D. Alabama Republican James D.
O'Hara in both the county and city Martin gave Sen. Lister Hill the
tallies over incumbent Paul L. scare of his 40-year political ca-
Adams. Incumbent Otis M. Smith reer, but late rural votes swung
took the county vote for the short- the election to him.
term seat over Louis D. McGregor Democrats and Republicans split
by a small margin. two other closely fought elections.
Fill Positions In Ohio Auditor General James
Republicans filled all' county A. Rhodes defeated Democratic
"ncii iL -s ncm- Gov. Michael V. DiSalle while in

ers eeParty
GOP Makes Small Inroads
By Taking New Statehouses
By MALINDA BERRY and RICHARD MERCER
In yesterday's gubernatorial elections the Democratic party gained
control of the capital in Vermont for the first time in 108 years, as
statehouses changed hands throughout the nation.
The Democrats apparently elected governors, while the Republi-
cans placed in state capitals. In New York incumbent Nelson Rocke-
feller defeated Robert Morgenthau by a smaller margin than had,

Balance

Staebler Winner
In Congress Race
Elect Democrats to Ad Board;
Seidman Wins Republican Slot
By DAVID MARCUS
George Romney apparently became Michigan's first Re-
publican governor in 14 years this morning, as he edged out in
front of incumbent Democrat Gov. John B. Swainson with 1.28
million votes to Swainson's 1.25 million votes, according to 4
a.m. Associated Press returns.
At the same time, Michigan voters split their ticket and
sent Neil Staebler to Washington at Michigan's congressman-
at-large by a 250,000 vote margin over his Republican op-
ponent Alvin Bentley.
In a vote which saw Swainson's early Wayne County mar-
gin of 210,000 whittled away into defeat, Romney managed to
capture approximately 40 per
cent of the heavily Democrat
Wayne County. He needed to rc
obtain approximately 34 per
cent of the Detroit vote.iilCongress
This portion of the Wayne
County vote-taken together with L d n
the normally heavily Republican ead i State
rural vote-spelled victory to Rom-
ney.~
In races for positions on Mich- By GLORIA BOWLES
igan'sadministrative board. it ap- Incumbent congressmen led in
peared that the only Democrats their districts as late returns last
likely to remain in office were
Treasurer Sanford Brown and Sec- night showed two close races, but
retary of State James A. Hare, no upsets.
who held decisive leads. In the second district, late vote

been predicted.
In Arkansas Orval Faubus was
Ricketts for an unprecedented fift
4
.Democrats
Post Gains
For Senate
BULLETIN
Former Gov. Milward Simp-
son (R) defeated incumbent
Democrat J. J. Hickey in Wyom-
ing's senatorial contest. In seven
other races, five Democrats were
leading as of 4 a.m. If they win,
the Democrats will hold a 68-32
margin in the Senate.
By GERALD STORCH
Gov. Gaylord Nelson's narrow
senatorial squeak iti Wisconsin
and smashing triumphs for Ed-
ward Kennedy in Massachusetts
and Abraham Ribicoff in Connect-
icut helped Democrats to a good
showing in yesterday's senatorial
races.
Probably the biggest upset oc-
curred in Wisconsin, where Nelson
bounced Republican Sen. Alex-
ander Wiley in his bid for a fifth
term.
Wins Handily
Democrats captured other seats
from Republicans in Connecticut
and Maryand and New Hamp-
shire. Ribicoff, former welfare sec-
retary, won handily over Repub-
lican Congressman Horace Seely-
Brown. Both were seeking the post
vacated by Sen. Prescott Bush.
In Maryland, Democrat Daniel
B. Brewster turned back Edward
T. Niller to win the position pre-
viously held by Sen. John Mar-
shall Butler (R); in New Hamp-
shire, Thomas J. McIntyre sur-
prised Republican Perkins Bass.
The Republicans gained back
one seat, however, as Rep. Peter
H. Dominick ousted Democrat Sen.
John A. Carroll of Colorado.
Other Races
Results of other races were about
as predicted, although in some in-
stances the margin of victory was
unexpected-particularly in Illi-
nois and Indiana.
In the former state, Republican
incumbent Everett Dirksen barely
defeated Rep. Sidney Yates after
a topsy-turvy race, while in In-
diana Republican Sen. Homer
Capehart as of 4 a.m. was trail-
ing Birch Bayh, with 80 per cent
of the votes counted.
Contests in other states went
normally. B i g - n a m e winners
among the Republicans included
Sen. Jacob Javits with a land-
slide in New York, and Sen. Thrus-
ton Morton, who sailed by in Ken-
tucky.
Kennedy's easy triumph (by
more than 500,000 votes) over
George Cabot Lodge in Massachu-
setts was the biggest feather in
the Democratic cap.

re-elected over Republican Willis
h term. William W. Scranton de-
feated Democrat incumbent Rich-
ardson Dilworth in the Pennsyl-
vania gubernatorial race.
Republican Defeated
Former secretary of commerce
in Iowa, Harold E. Hughes, de-
feated Republican incumbent Nor-
man A. Erbe., Oklahoma elected
its first Republican governor, Hen-
ry C. Bellmon.
California elected Edmund "Pat"
Brown, Democrat, over Richard M.
Nixon, while New Hampshire elect-
ed its first Democratic governor
in 40 years. John W. King defeated
Republican John Pillsbury.
In the midwest, Kansas re-elect-
ed Republican John Anderson, Jr.
over Dale Saffels, and Democrat
incumbent Frank B. Morrison de-
feated Fred A. Seaton (R) in Ne-
braska.
South Dakota
Republican Archie M. Gubbrud
defeated Ralph Herseth (D) in
South Dakota while, to the east
Frank G. Clement, Democrat, de-
feated Hubert Patty (R) in Ten-
nessee.
Gov. John Dempsey won a
smashing victory in Connecticut
over John Alsop.
Texas, however, remained Dem-
ocratic, as John Connelly, former
secretary of the Navy, beat off an
ambitious attack by John Cox, a
conservative Republican.
Colorado

-Daily-Bruce Taylor
Gov-elect George S. Romney
Romney 'Especially' Thanks
'U' Republican Supporters 1
Special To The Daily
DETROIT-Right after the 11th hour, when he had received word
of a victory based on the fact that he carried 40 per cent of Wayne
County, Governor-elect George Roniney, "especially thanked his sup-
porters at the University.",
In a private . interview in his 20th floor suite at the Pick-Fort
Shelby Hotel in Detroit, he predicted that the whole state ticket
would follow' him. In discussing the national picture he said that
he was gratified by the New York results, hoped for Republican
gains in the entire nation an dspecifically gave no preference in,
the California contest.
Republican State Chairman George van Peursen concurred in

Republican John A. Love took
over the statehouse in Colorado by
defeating former Gov. Stephen L. 1
R. McNichols.
James A. Rhodes, Republican,t
defeated incumbent Michael V. Di-t
Salle in Ohio, and Democrat Don-
ald Russell, running unopposed,t
gained the statehouse in South1
Carolina.
In New Mexico Jack M. Camp-
bell spoiled the ambitions of Re-1
publican incumbent Edwin L. Um-
echem for an unprecedented third
term. Campbell, at present, is the
speaker of the state House of Rep-
resentatives.
50th State
In the 50th state, the Demo-
crats scored another victory. John
A. Burns (D) defeated incumbent
Gov. William F. Quinn (R) to take
a four-year term in the Hawaiian
statehouse.
Endicott Peabody was holding
the lead over Republican incum-
bent John A. Volpe to continue a
Democrat trend in Massachusetts.
Democrat George C. Wallace was
unopposed in Alabama. Georgia's
unopposed Democrat Carl E. San-
ders also took the office.t
Chief OfficeI
Incumbent Gov. Mark O. Hat-
field, Republican, retained the1
chief office in Oregon against two
opponents, and Democrat incum-
bent Gov. Grant Sawyer detained
his statehouse in Nevada.1
Gov. William A. Egan, Democrat,
is leading in Alaska, while Repub-
lican Gov. Paul Fannin still re-
tains his Arizona lead. GOP Gov.
Robert E. Smylie also leads in
Idaho.

predicting that the whole ticket
would follow Romney.
Both Republicans and Demo-
crats predicted that the sunny
weather throughout the state yes-
terday would work to their advan-
tage.
Romney cast his vote early yes-
terday morning and then made
last minute campaign efforts in
Bay City, Lansing and Port. Huron
before returning to Detroit and
his campaign headquarters.
Detroit Elections Commissioner
Louis A. Urban said that a few
city voters had complained about
some of the 600 challengers work-
ing at the polls for the Committee
for Honest Elections. But no vot-
ing irregularities were reported in
the city.
In a prepared statement at 3:15
a.m. this morning Governor-elect
George Romney said that he would
wait until much later in the
morning to give his formal ac-
ceptance speech.
Romney indicated that he was
waiting for former Gov. John B.
Swainson's "customary conces-
sion."
Romney said that he had heard
that Swainson would make a state-
ment but that his formal conces-
sion would not come until later
this morning. He said that the
"proper thing to do is to wait
until the morning."
The new governor told voters
that he appreciated the dedication
and loyalty shown in the cam-
paign. He said that it was a
"thrilling experience."
Romney left his headquarters
for home and "a good night's
sleep" after making his statement.

Concession1
Released
BULLETIN
DETROIT (fP)-Gov. John B.
Swainson early 'today conceded
defeat to George Romney in the
Michigan gubernatorial election.
He was trailing the industrialist
by 62,500 votes, with 5,023 of the
5,199 precincts reporting.'f
Governor John B. Swainson re-
fused to issue a concession state-
ment late last night although the
election totals gave Governor-elect
George Romney a 50.,000 vote edge.
Romney, in a statement made
at 3 a.m. this morning said that
he would not issue a victory state-
ment until Swainson conceeded.
Congressman-elect Neil Staeb-
ler (D) spoke from campaign
headquarters in Detroit after
Romney's short appearance and
indicated that state Democrats
would follow Swainson's example
and not issue victory statements
until this morning when the final
totals are revealed and all the
votes are counted.
Swainson did not appear at all.
The Associated Press, United
Press International, Detroit Free
Press and television predictors all
claimed that Romney had won..
Swainson's statement will bej
revealed by his press secretary,)
Ted Olgar, a late news bulletin
said.

Lesinski Victoryi
Lieutenant Governor T. John I
Lesinski also appeared headed for p
victory with some 100,000 odd votes
over GOP candidate Clarence A.
Reid.
For attorney general, incumbent
Frank Kelly appeared to be beat-
ing GOP challenger Robert Dan-
hof. i
Treasurer Sanford Brown also
seemed destined to play the role s
of a Democrat in a Republican
administration, as he held a com- f
manding lead over his GOP' op-
ponent, Glenn S. Allen.
William Seidman, GOP candi-
date for auditor general, appear-
ed headed for victory over Billy
Farnum, Democratic incumbent.
See-Saw Race
In a see-saw election that reach-
ed a 125,000 Swainson margin in
its earlier stages and then plunged
to defeat, Romney didn't achieve
a majority until 2.30 a.m., ac-
cording to Associated Press re-
turns.
However, Romney had been con-
fident of victory ever since the
early returns from Wayne County
precincts-most of whichutilize
voting machines - showed that
Swainson had failed to achieve the
65 per cent of the vote necessary
for a Democrat in order to offset
the heavily Republican tendencies
of ruralvMichigan.
Despite Romney's victory, Bent-
ley was unable to ride the coat
tails of a Republican sweep and
received less than 33 per cent of
the Wayne County vote. It was
Bentley's second try for state-
wide office. He was defeated in a
bid for the United States Senate
by Sen. Pat McNamara two years
ago.
Serves in Congress
Prior to his attempt for the Sen-
ate, Bentley had been a long time
Congressman.
Staebler, an Ann Arbor resident,
was chairman of the Democratic,
Party for a number of years. This
was his first try for state-wide
office.
Romney's victory consisted of a
steadily increasing victory margin.
Fiscal Reform
His campaign had been based
on a program for fiscal reform,
leadership, unity instead of parti-
san bickering in Lansing, reorgan-
izatioi of the state executive
branch and a call for individual;
citizen participation in politics in-
stead of large pressure group
power politics.
Romney was president of Ameri-
can Motors Corp. and had been
vice-president of Michigan's con-
stitutional convention.
Romney is also a prominent!
leader in the Mormon Church in
Mfit'higaov,

NEIL STAEBLER
. .. congressman-elect

VARIETY OF REFERENDA:

lain (R) narrowly beat Don Hay-
worth of Lansing for the congres-
sional seat in the sixth district.
Turning to the state supreme
court race, Michigan voters choose
incumbent Otis M. Smith of De-
troit over Louis D. McGregor for
the short term, but turned down
a re-election bid by Paul L. Adams,
the incumbent and picked instead
Michael D. O'Hara.
Michigan voters passed a pro-
posed amendment to the. state
constitution which will prohibit
general revision of statues by the
Legislature, but authorizes a com-
pilation of laws.
Third District
In other Congressional contests,
Republicans August Johansen of

States Vote on Reapportionment Plans

By JERRY T. BAULCH
Associated Press Staff Writer

lems and state powers in case of
nuclear attack.k
._ . J .- 1 - . '. .1 ,

ed to the voters in Nebraska, Ore- South Carolina, Kansas, Idaho,
gon and West Virginia would give Arizona and North Carolina.

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