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November 01, 1962 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-11-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE EIGHT

THE MICHIGAN lt AlTv

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PAGEmEIHTi% ..,,aa tVal a .i '11 ,Lr in 1 L.A

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 1962

I

USTFF Power Increases Through AAU Delays

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By DAVE GOOD
The powder keg planted under
amateur athletics in America does
not have to explode, according to
one of the most outspoken rebels
in the sports federations' power,
struggle with the long-established
Amateur Athletic Union.
But Don Canham, Michigan
track coach and a pioneer in the
U.S. Track and Field Federation,
warns that time is running out for
peaceful negotiations between his
group and the AAU.
"Every day they (AAU officials)
procrastinate, we get stronger and
stronger. If it ends up in a dog-
fight, like it's heading, we're cer-
tainly not going to back down and
meet their terms after it's all over.
We feel we're going to win. They

join us now before we have to
knock-down and drag-out, or it's
no deal."
Poll Shows Support
Canham, one of the severest
critics of AAU policies and alleged
dictatorial control of sports here,
a year ago conducted polls re-
vealing nearly unanimous federa-
tion support among track coaches.
It is his contention that when
the first real showdown comes -=
probably on Thanksgiving Day
when the AAU and USTFF run off
conflicting cross-country meets-
the balance of power will have
shifted demonstrably away from
the "handful of guys" who he says
have now been deserted to run the
AAU on their own.
tanham explains that the AAU

*

no longer controls athletes, offi-
cials or facilities.
Financial Pinch
"We can operate without the
AAU, but it can't operate without
us," he added. "We're willing to
negotiate, but so far they haven't
seemed to have felt the impact of
what's happening. But they'll feel
it pretty quick. Nobody has been
paying their dues."
Despite Canham's contention
that nothing remains of the AAU
but a skeleton crew in New York,
it is still the official international
representative of U.S. sports and
as such can declare federation
competitors ineligible for meets
like the Olympic Games.
Canham feels that Congress will
not permit the AAU to "declare
half a million men ineligible" and
name AAU rinky-dinks on United
States teams, but he is worried
about the effect of the AAU's pos-
sible action toward foreign athletes
who compete here.
Track First
"For the good of track, we'd like
to see these foreigners compete
-guys like (Finnish pole vaulter
Pentti) Nikula and (Russian high
jumper Valeri) Brumel," he ex-
plained.
This is one reason why the fed-
erations might be willing to nego-

actual joining of forces. He points
out that if the AAU would make
certain concessions, the federation
would then be willing to negotiate.
If the two groups can get close
enough to enter into dual sanc-
tion agreements, then there still
might be hope for a merger-on
federation terms. "That's what we
figure. If they go that far, then
they might join the federation,"

he commented, adding that there
have been no indications of any
change of attitude among AAU
executives.
Canham thinks that one more
step yet to be taken is for the
NCAA to go through with its plans
to set up penalties for college
athletes who compete in AAU
meets.
"I don't see how the NCAA can

T

MORE CONTACT:
Jones Likes Playing Defense
By PETE DiLORENZI I .

do anything else. There has been
a unanimous vote on everything
so far. I would expect the NCAA
to see the thing through properly,"
he predicted.
"I have unlimited respect for
the people in the NCAA. They're
just trying to give the athletes a
fair shake, which they haven't
had in this country for the past 50
years."

-

m

r

Sky Diving Anyone?
All those interested in sky
diving (see article of Oct. 31)
should contact Dave Myers at
665-8774. He will be happy to
answer all questions.

Dennis Benson Jones, number 41
on Michigan's football team, has
all the qualifications to be one of
the Big Ten's star ball carriers.
But, as of yet, he has not come
close to realizing his true potential.
Why?
On the positive side he has the
necessary size, 6'2"; weight, 198;
and power, he played fullback as
well as halfback at Worthington
High, outside of Columbus, where
he made the all-district and all-
regional teams.
.. . And the Speed
He also has the speed-plenty
of it.
He ran the 100-yd. dash in 9.7
in an AAU meet two years ago,
placing fourth in a meet with
Hayes Jones and Nate Adams. In
high school, besides starring in
football and basketball, he was
something close to a one-man
track team, running the 100 and
220, the low- hurdles, and the
broad and high jumps.
On the negative side there are
injury, rate of development, and
a problem of harnessing his speed.
After a stellar performance in
Blue-White scrimmage after last
spring's practice season, Jones re-
turned in the fall and soon suffer-
ed a neck injury which kept him
from top performance.
Hurt
"He'd been hurt early in the fall
practice period and as a result, he
was slow in developing at the same
rate as the rest of the team.
We've been bringing him along

-Daily-Bruce Taylor
ON THE SCENE-Dennis Jones (41) moves in to stop Army left-
half John Seymour (43) for short yardage. Senior center Mike
Miller (52) of {Army leaves his feet in a diving attempt to force
Jones out of the play. Other Wolverines try to grab Seymour from
behind.

tiate, says Canham, but they
would also like to quell some of
the unfavorable publicity heaped
on them.
"We've been criticized on the
grounds that we want to kill the
AAU. But we don't. We just want
what's best for track," he com-
mented. .
NCAA Pushes Boycott
The most influential backer of
the sports revolt, the National Col-
legiate Athletic Association, has
advocated a college boycott of AAU
competition unless the event also
has a federation sanction.
It is this notion of a dual sanc-
tion which Canham regards as
virtually the only road left toward
friendly relations between the
USTFF and the AAU, short of an

slowly now that he has recovered
from his injury and plan to keep
using him in spots until he's ready
to go all the way," said head Coach
Bump Elliott.
So far those spots have been
almost exclusively defensive ones.
His first appearance of the season
was in the late minutes of the Ar-
my game, when he was inserted in
the defensive backfield to tighten
it up against the passes of Cam-
my Lewis. He played periodically
against Michigan State and quite
a lot against Purdue. Last week,
against Minnesota, he entered the
game in the second half as the
flankerback and remained for only
two plays, leaving the game slight-
ly shaken up.
"We don't plan to use him on
offense until he can harness his
speed," commented Elliott. "Hej
can block pretty well, but he hasn't
yet learned to hit the holes well
enough to play regularly."
Playing defense isn't anything
new to Jones, who played a defen-
sive corner back at Worthington
... and liked it better than he did
offense.

"I always liked playing defense
better than offense in high school.
I guess I liked the contact of it."
Jones came here because of
Michigan's " Architecture School
Starting Track Club
All those interested in form-
ing a track club, tentatively to
be called the Ann Arbor Track
Club, are asked to come to Yost
Field House tomorrow (Nov. 2)
at 5 p.m. An organizational
meeting is scheduled for that
time. All former trackmen are
invited.
and because it is close to his home.
He hopes someday to become an
architect.
His biggest thrill so far was his
9.7 hundred in that AAU meet,
and playing his first Big Ten game
against Army.
But there is a distinct possibil-
ity that he may soon have anoth-
er, bigger, thrill.
As soon as he harnesses that
speed.

By a gradual process of elimination, this week's grid selections
can be easily made. First, pick all the Big Ten games to be won by
the underdog. Second, make a list of the next fifteen either by typing
them triple space or by skipping two lines on lined paper. Then get
a toothpick and fasten a pin to one end, thus making a dart out of it
(for you who are less mechanically inclined-buy one). Throw this at
the paper with the list of games, the team being hit by the dart shall
be the winner.
This method will surely net you a subscription to the Football
News and two free passes to the Michigan Theatre, currently showing
"If A Man Answers," starring Bobby Darrin and Sandra Dee.
THIS WEEK'S GAMES

I Ifl ,-

J

TWO YEARS:
Dayton Is Handed
NCAA Probation

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November 8 & 9, 1962
Find out more about the wide range of
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For interview appointment or informational
literature consult your College Placement
Director. Or write: College Placement Office
Hughes, P.O. Box 90515, Los Angeles 9, Calif:

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

Wisconsin at Michigan (score)
Minnesota at Michigan State.
Northwestern at Indiana
Illinois at Purdue
Ohio State at Iowa
Notre Dame at Navy
Cornell at Columbia
Syracuse at Pittsburgh
Maryland at Penn State
North Carolina at Clemson

11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.

No. Carolina State at Georgia
Georgia Tech at Duke
Auburn at Florida
Boston College at Vanderbilt
Mississippi at Louisiana State
Missouri at Nebraska
Iowa State at Oklahoma State
UCLA at California
Washington at So. California
Wyoming at Air Force

NEW YORK WP)-The National
Collegiate Athletic Association
slapped a two-year probationary
period on Dayton, 1962 National
Invitation Tournament champion,
yesterday primarily for illegal
transportation provided former

NEW STYLES FIRST AT WILD S
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This emporium has a large and
varied selection of all that's
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Many such fashions are inspired
or imported from the continent
of Europe. It willbe our pleas- .
ure to present these fashions
to you in person.

basketball prospect Roger Brown
of New York.
Brown was not identified by the
NCAA, but in Dayton, the Rev.
Raymond A. Roesch, university
president, confirmed he was the
individual involved and said the
incident resulted from a trip
Brown made from Dayton to New
York for an appearance in traf-
fic court.
The president added: "The ath-
letic, department was motivated by
what it judged to be a hardship
case and felt that it was justified.
We accept the penalty imposed by
the NCAA committee on infrac-
tions and will continue to make
every effort to abide by all the laws
and by-laws of the NCAA."
In the other cases, Florida and
McMurry (Tex) College drew rep-
rimands, but no suspensions, for
minor rules violations. Florida was
censured because its basketball
coach, Norman Sloan, recruited a
student-athlete in 1960 from an-
other college without obtaining
permission from the other athletic
director.
McMurry's slap came on two
counts--that its 1961-62 basketball
team played a game aghinst Cor-
pus Christi on Nov. 29, 1961 - two
days before the permissable start
of the season; and because the
same team played 27 regular sea-
son games, one over the limit.

-

I

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