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November 01, 1962 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-11-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE 8rX

THE MICHIGAN UAiT.V

PAGE ~1VT 1 UTT'V

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 1962

'

VOCATIONAL GUIDANCE SERVICE
Interested in Working Abroad?
PANEL DISCUSSION
Careers Abroad

COLLEGE ROUNDUP:
Cuba Crisis Prompts Shelter Evaluation

i

Biological Station Changes
Offices, but Not Programs

4~

By MARTHA MacNEAL
and DAVID FEINBERG

Thurs., Nov. 1
4:15 p.m.
Room 3G
Michigan Union

" Business
* Engineering
* Teaching

WASHINGTON - The recent
Cuban crisis has elicited evalua-
tions of campus shelter facilities
from many United States colleges
and universities. Indiana Univer-
sity, the University of Florida,
Louisiana State University, Ohio
State University, and Ohio Uni-
versity have released statements
designating shelter areas on their
campuses.
CAMBRIDGE -)-A Dwight D.
Eisenhower Scholarship Fund for
graduate students in Harvard
University is established in the
will of a distinguished medical
scientist who was Harvard's first
Negro professor.
The fund, not yet complete, may
amount to $75,000.
Former President Eisenhower
was advised that the late Prof.
William Hinton, in setting up the
fund, asked that it be named in
recognition of notable accomplish-
ments toward the acceptance of
the principle of equal opportunity
during the Eisenhower administra-
tion. In a letter to Harvard Presi-
dent Nathan M. Pusey, the form-
er President said, "I cannot recall
having been given a personal dis-
tinction that has touched me more
deeply."
** *
GAINESVILLE--Five students
of the University of Florida left
campus last week to join "any or-

ganization attempting an imme-
diate invasion of Cuba," the Flor-
ida Alligatior reports.
LAKELAND-A University of
South Florida faculty member has
been suspended but not dismissed
on charges stemming from his
presentation of excerpts from the
works of Jack Kerouac in one of
his classes. USF Board in Control
policy states that classroom ma-
terial must be "within the pur-
view of good taste and common
decency."
* * *
BLOOMINGTON-The student
senate of Indiana University has
refused a second time to grant
recognition to the Young Social-
ists' Alliance, this time by a vote
of 11-6.
S* * *
AUSTIN-Up before the Texas
legislature is a recommendation
by the Texas Commission on
Higher Education that tuition in
state-supported colleges be dou-
bled beginning in 1964. Three per
cent of the gross in tuition would
then be used as a special fund
for 'hardship scholarships."
* * *
PROVIDENCE-Six Brown, and
Pembroke University students
were dismissed from Brown on
the charge of "social immaturity"
and "ungentlemanly behavior."
The dismissal concerned the vio-
lation of the Honor Code regula-

tions concerning sign out proce-
dure and overnight permission.
TAMPA - The Florida State
Board in Control of Education has
called for closer checks on sex
deviates on the state campuses.
This will require university presi-
dents to file reports every three
months on action taken by them
to remove such activity from their
campuses.
PHILADELPHIA-The ad hoc
committee on Undergraduate Pub-
lications at the University of Pen-
nesylvania has outlined a plan
designed to delineate the future
of The Daily Pennsylvanian. If
adopted, the Pennsylvanian would
become financially independent
under a non-profit corporation.
* * *
BOSTON-Enforcing the separ-
ation of church and state, public
school authorities have removed
30 pages on the history of Chris-
tianity from the text, "A History
of Civilization," written by three
Harvard professors.
The objectionable pages were
removed by the authorities at For-
est Grove Junior High School
where the book is currently being
used on a trial basis.
The authors expressed no con-
cern over the incident, since the
book was written for college under-
graduates, not for ninth graders,
since all copyright privileges for
the text have been turned over to
the publishers.
CINCINNATI (;P) - Enrollment
in American colleges and univer-
sities rose this fall for the tenth
straight year, but the rate of in-
crease may be slowing, Registrar
Garland G. Parker of the Univer-
sity of Cincinnati says.
Parker, who conducts an annual
enrollment survey, said more than
2,325,000 full-time students are
attending 1,047 registered institu-
tions, compared to 2,257,921 at the
same time last year.
He said total enrollment in

American colleges this year may
exceed four million compared to
the 1961-62 total of 3,891,000.
ALBANY (R) - Walter J. Ma-
honey, majority leader of the state
senate, and the University of Buf-
falo are at odds again over the
university's latest invited speaker.
This time it is Herbert Aptheker,
a member of the national commit-
tee of the Communist party in the
United States, who had been in-
vited by the student association.
The last time it was Sir Oswald
Mosley, leader of a fascist move-
ment in Britain before World War
II and still a controversial figure.
Many groups protested his appear-
ance at the university to no avail.
In a letter to Frank C. Moore,
chairman of the state university's
board of trustees, Mahoney said
the board should invoke this rule
it adopted in 1956:
"Persons who advocate the over-
throw of our government by vio-
lence will be denied the privilege
of use of university facilities."
NEW HAVEN (M) - The Yale
PoliticalUnion has cancelled the
Nov. 12 appearance of Gus Hall,
secretary general of the American
Communist party.
The undergraduate forum voted
86 to 83 to withdraw the invitation
at the urging of William F. Buck-
ley Jr., editor and publisher of the
National Review, a conservative
magazine.
Buckley, a former member of
the Political Union and a 1950
graduate of Yale, said Hall's ap-
pearance would be degrading for
the university and the forum.
Tria ngle Honors
Five Engineers
The following men were tapped
last night for Triangles, a junior
engineering honorary: Ted Kelly;
Douglas Kuziak, William Muir,
David Patt and Norman Peslar.

By ANTHONY CHIU
About a month ago, a 54-year
relationship between two Univer-
sity departments was severed by
progress.
The University Biological Sta-
tion, located near Pellston, was
removed from the ledgers of the
summer session, and placed in the
records of the literary college, the
result of the impending year-
round operation.
The station and the summer ses-
sion had enjoyed a fruitful rela-
tionship since 1909, when 15 stu-
dents attended its initial program.
Through 54 sessions the station's
population has grown to 234 per-
sons.
Internal Function
Prof. A. H. Stockard of the
zoology department, its director,
says the change in bookkeeping
would in no way affect the inter-
nal functionings of the station.
Located 275 miles north of Ann
Arbor, it is the oldest existing col-
lege-operated biological post in
the nation. Its purpose is to pro-
vide students enrolled in botany,
zoology and forestry, with an op-
portunity to observe and study
nature from a close vantage point.
In addition to the eight-week
summer session, which offers 20
courses, the station is used ex-
tensively throughout the year by
graduate students and research
workers who are conducting work
on independent projects.
Student Use
It is ideally situated for its pur-
pose, occupying 9,000 acres of land
between Douglas and Burt Lakes.
Prof. Stockard says that students
at the station have at their dis-
posal over two million acres of
state and private land and water.
In the immediate vicinity of the
30 acre campus, there are avail-
able for the students' studies
"1,000 species of flowering plants;
52 species of mammals, 16 of rep-
tiles, 16 of amphibians, and 75 of
fish; 150 species of birds, includl-

_______ I
'I

STUDENT
GOVERNMENT
COUNCIL
announces
PETITIONING
for
INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS
BOARD-6 positions open
.*. develops programs to increase person to person and small
group contact between American and Foreign students.
EARLY REGISTRATION PASS
COMMITTEE-4 positions open
. . Is active during registration week . . . hears requests from
students who are working, in athletics, in campus organizations,
and others for out of order registration.
HUMAN RELATIONS BOARD
5 positions open
. . . considers cases and areas involving discrimination against
students . . . works in a positive manner to encourage better
human relations in the University and Ann Arbor communities.
CINEMA GUILD-6 positions open
. . . is the board which chooses the movies shown at Cinema
Guild . .. receives petitions from student organizations who wish
to sponsor the showings. Members of the board are guests of
the sponsoring organization at any movie.
STUDENT BOOK EXCHANGE
MANAGER-3 assistant managers
. . . manager receives $100 per semester for running the Student
Book Exchange in the Student Activities Building. Three assistant
managers receive $50 each. One semester terms.
PUBLIC RELATIONS DIRECTOR-
1 one-year term open
DEADLINE EXTENDS UNTIL 3:00 TODAY
Petitions available at
Student Government Council Offices
First Floor, Student Activities Building
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, CONTACT:
Ken Miller
Administrative Vice-President
N03-0553 or NO 5-7183

League Thanksgiving
AirFlight to New York
Money Due
Saturday-$74.90

David Patt and Norman Peslar. fish; 150 species of birds, includ-

( .'.'
-,.'''
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ing migrants; 76 species of snails;
15 of clams; and 23 orders of in-
sects."
Field trips are also taken to
many points within 150 miles of
the station.
At the present, there are 143
buildings on the station's campus
along the southern shore of Doug-
las Lake. All these structures ex-
cept for one was built with Uni-
versity funds. The lone exception,
a forestry building, was erected
by the Civilian Conservation
Corps during the 30's.
Full Facilities
The campus is now in a near
self-sustaining state, boasting its
own streets, electrical, water and
sewage systems, post office, health
service, store and recreational
facilities.
Last summer, 122 students from
28 states, the District of Colum-
bia, the Canal Zone, Canada, Bur-
ma, Cambodia, Italy, Mexico, Nic-
aragua, and Portugal studied at
the station, and 17 professors from
10 colleges. An additional 87 per-
sons, including famiines, employees
and station staff swelled the sum-
mer population, in contrast with
the small handful present at the
station's first session in 1909.
The station is operating at near
capacity, according to Prof. Stock-
ard. Besides the fact that there
is a shortage of additional housing
facilities for additional students,
there could also be an overstress
upon some of the wildlife.
As things stand now, the flora
and fauna of the area replenish
themselves during the intervening
nine months between summer ses-
sions. If a greater demand was
made on some of the plant and
animal species, Prof. Stockard
notes, the delicate balance of na-
ture could be affected.
The students at the station
carry four to eight hours per sum-
mer, with -a variety of two hour
courses being offered. Each course
consumes one day per week, With
the student in class from 7:45 a.
until 4:15 p.m.
The demand to be admitted at
the station is great, Prof. Stockard
indicated. The abundance of wild-
life makes it an ideal spot for
nature studies, while the beauty
of the area makes it an ideal spot
to spend a summer. "However, al-
though"the area is an ideal vaca-
tion spot, and has as a matter of
fact many summer resorts.. .the
tone of the camp is extremely
dedicated"
The station receives more than
215 applications for the summer
sessions, with the acceptance rate
being a little over 50 per cent.
.Prof. Stockard stated the only
Prerequisities are an active in-
terest in nature studies, and at
least one year of experience in
biology.
BAHA'U'LLAH
THE
SAVIOUR
OF ALL
MANKIND
VICTORIOUS LIVING
"Lift up your hearts above
the present and look with eyes
of faith into the future. Today
the seed is sown, the grain falls
upon the earth, but behold the
day will come when it will rise a
glorious tree, and the branches
thereof shall be laden with fruit.
"Rejoice and be glad that
this Day of God has dawned.
Try to realize its power, for it
is indeed wonderful

"God hath crowned your
heads with honor and within
your hearts has He set a rad-
iant star. Verily the Light
THEREOF W I L L BRIGHTEN
THE ENTIRE world.
"Should a man all alone rise
up in the name of Baha' and
put on the armor of His love,
him will the Almighty cause to
be victorious, though the forces
of earth and HEAVEN be
ARRAYED against HIM."
"Armed with the power of
Thy Name, and with Thy love
in my heart, all the world's
af flictions can in no wise alarm
me.",
VICTORiOUS LIVING
in a World of Turmoil
will be the subject of
WINSTON G. EVANS
final talk, Thurs., Nov. 1,
8 P.M.
Auditorium A,
Angell Hall
Sponsored by U of M
Raha'i Stuidnt Gnruo

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You have (or wil have) your Ph.D. or Master's Degree
YOU MAY FIND THAT A MOVE TO MARTIN WILL BE A MOVE UP IN YOUR
CAREER ... A MOVE AHEAD TOWARD SIGNIFICANT ACCOMPLISHMENT
Important Martin positions for PHYSICISTS, ENGINEERS, APPLIED MATHEMATICIANS and SCIENTISTS
with advanced degrees in:

AERONAUTICAL OR ASTRONAUTICS

PHYSICS, NUCLEAR PHYSICS A SCIENCE

Dynamics Analysis
Magnetohydro-
dynamics
Flutter, Turbulence

Fluid Dynamics
Wave Phenomena
Re-entry Heating
Problems
Plate and Thin-shell
Structures

Hypersonic-Rarefied
Gas Flow

Energy Conversion
(Thermionic &,.
Magnetohydro.
dynamics)
Electron Optics
Infrared
Cryogenics

Acoustic Power
Prediction
Advanced Reactor
Studies
Underwater
Acoustics
Thinfilms
Radioisotope Fueled
Generator Devel-
opment

Wave Propagation
in Solids
Plasma Microwave
Interactions
Guidance &
Adaptive Control
Processes

CIVIL

Elasticity and
Plasticity
Random Loading

CHEMISTRY (Physical-Organic)

Experimental Stress
Analysis of Struc-
tures at Elevated
Temperatures
Solid State Devices
Kinetics of reaction
Plastics

PROPULSION THERMODYNAMICS

Non-equilibrium or
Aero-chemical
aspects of very hi-
speed flight

Radiochemistry
Hi-temp chemical
reactions

Fluid Dynamics of
multi-phase gases
Liquid Rocket
Studies

Advanced Space
Propulsion
Systems
Mechanical Aspects
of Advanced
Reactors

ELECTRICAL OR ELECTRONICS

MATHEMATICS (Applied)

Data Processing
Solid State Circuitry
Infrared
Microwave
Guidance &
Navigation
Visual Presentation
Systems
Cryogenics

Propagation
Problems
Command &
Control
Plasma Microwave
Interactions
Energy Conversion
(Thermoelectric)

Information Theory
Semi-Conductor
Studies
Advanced Communi-
cationeSystems
Studies
Automatic Control
Systems
Aerospace Vehicle
Electrical Power
Distribution
Systems

Classical Mechanics
Orbital Mechanics
Systems Evaluation
of Reactors

Theory of Dynamic
Programming
Systems Optimiza-
tion & Nonlinear
Methods

Radiation heat
transfer problenm
Environmental
Systems (ultra-
high vacuum)
Digital Logic &
Adaptive
Processes
Random Signal
Theory Studies
Interplanetary
Trajectories
Effects of Metal-
lurgical Structures
(Creep & Stress
Rupture behavior
of super-alloy and
refractory metals)

METALLURGY
Hi-temp Materials
Solid-State Devices
ENYDawMaPwA e AO

Advanced Welding
Joining Techniques

4I

ON-CAMPUS INTERVIEWS
A...ilw Ww

I

IMM1ICT'U I l * P*Jn# 5f4V

I

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