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October 28, 1962 - Image 13

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-10-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 28,1962_

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGESEVEN

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 28, 1962 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE SEVEN

OS U Purdue, JSU

Whin

in

Big

Ten1

By The Associated Press
Ohio State proved that it
couldn't be done twice in a row as
the Buckeyes defeated Wisconsin,
14-7, to highlight yesterday's Big
Ten action.
Purdue scored a decisive 26-3
win over Iowa and Michigan State
bettered Indiana 26-8 in the other
conference games. In the non-con-
ference games Northwestern roll-
ed over Notre Dame, 35-6; and
Southern California triumped over
Illinois, 28-16.
* * *
Bucks Battle Back
The twice-beaten Bucks battled
their way back into the Big Ten
title race by knocking Wiscon-
sin out of the undefeated class
before a home crowd of 82,540 in
a regionally televised game.
The loss dropped Wisconsin to
a 4-1 record, moved Ohio up to
3-2 and maintained the Buckeye
record of never having lost to the
Badgers at Columbus since 1918.
It was a rugged struggle all the
way, with surprise maneuvers pay-
ing off until Ohio ground out the

victory with a fourth-quarter 57-
yd. 8-play drive to cinch it.
Ohio scored in the first period on
quarterback Joe Sparma's 21-yd.
pass to Paul Warfield, ending a 48-
yd. drive in 8 plays.
Wisconsin tied it in the second
session when quarterback Ron
VanderKelen passed 47 yards to
sophomore halfback Ron Smith on
a "no huddle" play. The surprise
play came just after Jim Schenk
had intercepted a sparma pass
and fullback Merritt Norvell had
plunged for four yds.
The Badgers came out of the
running play into their offensive
positions while Ohio was still call-
ing defensive signals in a semi-
huddle. Smith cut for the right
sideline and Venderkelen found
him with the pass about the 40-yd.
line, with the youngster evading
Ohio tacklers the rest of the way.
Boilermakers Boil
Purdue stayed in the Big Ten
football race whipping Iowa with
a hard-hitting attack that smoth-

ered the home team Hawkeyes'
futile bids.
The victory, powered by full-
backs Roy Walker and Gene Don-
aldson, was the second without a
loss in conference play for the
Boilermakers.
Purdue went ahead 6-3 in the
second quarter when quarterback
Ron DiGravio plunged over from
the one. The Boilermakers clinch-
ed the triumph with third-quarter
touchdowns by Tom Bloom and
Gary Hogan. The last Purdue score
came in the final minutes when
Tom Boris cracked over from the
two-yd. line.
* * *
Saimes Again
At Bloomington, Michigan State
sent rugged George Saimes across
the Indiana goal line three times
and Dewey Lincoln once to beat
the Hoosiers.
The Spartans, ranked No. 10 in
the Associated Press poll, had the
class to compensate for five lost-
ball fumbles. The bobbles came

after they had scored twice in the
first five minutes on Lincoln's 25-
yd. dash and a Saimes plunge set
up by little Sherman Lewis' 29-yd.
run.
Ron Rubick returned a punt 38
yds. to the Indiana 17 in the sec-
ond quarter and Saimes went over
from the one.
Lewis ran a kickoff back 38 yds.
early in the final period, to the
Michigan State 49, and it took 11
plays to send Saimes over the goal
line from the Hoosier 3.
Indiana, losing for the 17th
straight time to a Big 10 op-
ponent moved 67 yds. for its
touchdown in the third quarter,
quarterback Woody Moore going
the last three yards and passing
to Jim Bailey for the conversion.
# * s
Myers to Flatley
Undefeated Northwestern's bril-
liant Tom Myers-tosPaul Flatley
passing combination, clicking twice
for touchdowns, swept the nation-
ally third-ranked Wildcats to a

record triumph over
Dame.

shaky NotreI

wrap
tory.

up their fifth straight vie-
* * *

Myers, the nation's No. 3 major
college passer, completed 11 of 18
tosses for 168 yds. before reserves
took over for Northwestern mid-
way in the third period.
Flatley, the nation's third best
pass receiver, made several circus
catches as he snared six Myers
tosses for 102 yds., including
touchdown grabs of 23 and 6 yds.
A Dyche Stadium record crowd
of 55,752 saw Northwestern, now
a hot Big 10 title favorite, strike
quickly for three first-half touch-
downs on Notre Dame errors to
Big Ten Standings

Poor Illinois
A 73-yd. scoring pass and a 73-
yd. touchdown run-both coming
within one and a half minutes of
playing time-rocketed fourth-
ranked Southern Califormit over
winless Illinois.
The Illini, absorbing their 15th
straight loss, moved in front 8-7
midway in the second period. It
was the first time since their 14-
10 defeat at USC in the 1961 finale
they had been ahead in a game.
With 45 seconds to go before
halftime, Pistol Pete Beathard hit
towering end Had Bedsole on a 73-
yd. touchdown play, their second
aerial jackpot of the day. Bill Nel-
sen passed to Bedsole for two ex-
tra points and the Trojans moved
ahead 15-8.
In the opening 45 seconds of the
third quarter, Willie Brown popped
off tackle into the clear and
streaked 73 yds. to score. A conver-
sion pass failed.

Northwestern
Michigan State
Purdue
Ohio State
Wisconsin
Minnesota
Iowa
Indiana
Michigan
Illinois

W
3
2
2
2
2
2
1
0
0
0

L
0
0
0
1
1
1
2
3
3

1.000
1.000
1.000
.667
.667
.667
.333
.000
.000
.000

Pct. PF PA

97 36
57 8
63 3
.79 40
54 20
56 34
31 78
24 72
0 82
15 113

11'

COLLEGE ROUNDUP:

RiceT
By The Associated Press
HOUSTON - Randall Kerbow
passed 18 yds. to Ronnie Graham
to climax a 57-yd. fourth period
touchdown drive and give the un-
derdog Rice Owls a 14-14 tie last
night with the Texas Longhorns,
the nation's No. 1 collegiate team.
An overflow crowd of 73,000 saw
Rice, with nothing better than a
tie with Louisiana State on its
four-game season . record, surge
from behind to record the first
tie in the history of the 49 meet-
ings between the traditional South-
west Conference rivals.
The Owls, matching the mighty
Texas defense at every turn, jump-
ed to a 7-0 first period lead on a
49-yd. scamper by Paul Piper, a
200-lb. sophomore, but Texas roar-
ed back for a 14-7 advantage as
Tommy Ford scored one touch-
down and set up another with a.
55-yd. punt return.
UCLA Upset
LOS ANGELES - Under-rated
but inspired Stanford wrecked the
initial Rose Bowl bid of UCLA in
the Big Six Conference yesterday
as quarterback Steve Thurlow led
the Indians 89 yds. for a clinching
fourth period touchdown and a
17-7 victory. '
Stanford, which had lost three
straight, dominated the game be-
fore 33,415 in Memorial Coliseum.
Thurlow guided Stanford in the
89-yd. penetration that began in
the third period and concluded
when he carried the ball 15 yds. to
the UCLA two and !Anded off to
halfback John Payne for the
final yd.
Miami's Mira
AIR FORCE ACADEMY, Colo.-
George Mira, Miami's miracle
man, mixed passes with the slick
running of halfback Nick Ryder
yesterday and the Hurricanes
smothered Air Force 21-3 before
32,787 football fans.
The Miami missile man scored
one touchdown and passed for an-
other in a display of leadership
that baffled the Air Force.
*. .
'decisive Tie
SEATTLE - The Webfoots of
Oregon, seemingly whipped, struck
in the final quarter yesterday for
a touchdown and two-point con-
version that earned them a 21-21
tie with favored Washington,
eighth-ranked team in the nation.
The Webfoots dominated the
play from there to the finish, a
wild two minutes that ended with

ies

Top-Ranked Texas

1~

/

i>

the blacher crowd swarming in the
end zone as a final Oregon pass
was knocked down at the Wash-
ington goal.
Oregon had scored first but
Washington tied the count at 7-7
in the second quarter and went in
front in the third.
Middies Roll
NORFOLK, Va. - Roger Stau-
bach, Navy's sensational 20-year-
old sophomore quarterback, pulled
the old sleeper play out of the
football moth balls for an early
66-yd. touchdown and went on
to lead the Navy to a 32-9 victory
over Pittsburgh in the Oyster
Bowl yesterday.
Staubach, who gained the Navy's
No. 1 quarterback spot only two
weeks ago, completed all of his
eight passing attempts for 192
yds, gained 28 yds. rushing and
scored one touchdown.
* * * .
New Sensation
STILLWATER, Okla. -Kansas
rallied from a 17-7 first half
deficit to score two touchdowns
in the third quarter and two more
in the fourth to defeat Oklahoma
State in a Big Eight Conference
football game 36-17 yesterday.
Gale Sayers, sophomore half-
back whose 69-yd. run put Kansas
in position for its first touchdown
in the second quarter, broke loose

in the fourth period from his own
4-yd. line and ran .96 yds. for a
touchdown.
Lions Squeak By
BERKELEY-Penn State em-
ployed the running of Roger Koch-
man and the passing of Pete
Liske to full advantage yesterday
and made off with a 23-21 victory
over a stubborn California team
that unveiled a new sophomore
star.
It was the 37-yd. field goal by
Ron Coates in the second period
that proved decisive as Craig Mor-
ton threw three touchdown passes
for the Bears.
Morton suffered a knee injury
on the first day of fall practice
and underwentan operation. He
appeared in the second quarter
yesterday for his first varsity com-
petition. The 19-year-old com-
pleted 20 of 28 passes for 274
yards. Two were intercepted.
* * *
W. Virginia Smeared
PORTLAND, Ore. - O r e g o n
State crushed West Virginia's
football team 51-22 yesterday, with
the first half passing and running
of Terry Baker the feature of the
afternoon.
Oregon State led 37-6 at the
half and coasted in with a pair of
touchdowns in the last two
periods.

Baker fired three touchdown
passes and gained 200 yds. in the
first half as Oregon State scored
on thrusts of 69, 72, 67; 70 and
77 Yds.
* A *
Tide Rolls
TUSCALOOSA - Alabama kept
tight reins on Tulsa's passing at-
tack yesterday and put on a
flashy running display for a 35-6
victory.
Alabama's charging line often
forced Tulsa's passing quarter-
backs, Ramiro Escandon and
StuartrMcBirnie, to throw before
receivers were in position.
The Crimson Tide gave an early
signal of victory after Richard
Williamson recovered a fumble on
Tulsa's first play from scrimmage.
* * *
Southern Squeezer
CLEMSON - Kicking specialist
Woody Woodall booted a 27-yd.
field goal in the final periodrhere
yesterday to give unbeaten Auburn
a breath-taking 17-14 victory over.
Clemson.
Clemson, considered the under-
dog, took a 7-0 first quarter lead,,
fell behind when Auburn scored
twice in the second period, but
tallied a touchdown of its own to
make it 14-14 at halftime.

wwea.-- ; :.s;;S: :

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I

Pall Mall Presents-
GIRL WATCHER'S GUIDE

-U

FREE, PUBLIC MEETING
RALPH MUNCY
Socialist Labor Candidate for-
Representative in Congress at large
will speak
"The Coming Revolution in America"
Tuesday, October 30-7:30 P.M.
Angell School Auditorium

...

1608 S.

University Avenue-Ann Arbor

1~
ATED
)N

SPONSORED BY SECTION WASHTENAW ,COUNTY
SOCIALIST LABOR PARTY

( ..

LAB-Lac

7

.,

4 v

you? of course you.
we would like very much
to have you petition for
the central committee of
spring weekend '63.

Don't let this girl's costume fool you. She's not really a
mad scientist. She's a girl-a real, live girl. It's just that
she has to prove something-to herself and to her family.
She has to prove that she has a brain and that, if she
ever has to compete with men on their own terms, she
can do it-and win. But she really doesn't want to com-
pete with men. In her heart she wants to attract men
and eventually, marry one. The girl watcher should not
let this situation disturb him, however.
If the girl is watchable, she should be watched, no
matter what her motives or ambitions may be. The same

f _ E

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