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October 28, 1962 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-10-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 28, 1962

THE MIHCHIGAN D AILYV

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PAGE kTHR~E

P,

Chinese

Troops

Heading

Towards Plains of Assam,

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CD:
Officials
Ask Local
Build-Up
WASHINGTON (P)-The Office
of Civil Defense called yesterday
on the nation's state and city offi-
cials to speed preparations for pro-
tecting Americans in case of nu-
clear attack.
At the same time, the federal
officials said they were stepping
up their civil defense program.
Spurred by the Cuban crisis, the
civil defense office called for near-
ly doubling the amount of shelter
space available by lowering the
standards now required for shield-
ing from radiation.
Steuart L. Pittman, assistant
secretary of defense for civil de-
fense, said thiat by using space in
additional buildings it will be pos-
sible to accommodate 110 to 120
million persons, instead of 60 mil-
lion.
At present, shelter areas are re-
quiredmtomcut outside radiation by
100 times. Under the lowered
standards, the radiation would
have to be cut by only 40 times.
Pittman met at the Pentagon
with nine governors from the Civil
Defense. Committee of the gover-
nors conference.
The governors, headed by Nel-
son A. Rockefeller of New York,
also spent a half hour with Pres-
ident John F. Kennedy at the
White House.

CHINESE MOVES--Map of China-India frontier shows Ladakh
and northeast frontier areas, shaded, where Chinese troops have
scored advances. India has moved forces into Tezpur to counter
Red drives which overran the towns of Towang and Kibitoo.
World News Roundup
By The Associated Press
ADDIS ABABA-Thirty-three persons were killed and 50 wounded
in tribal clashes at the towns of Geldegeb and Burtele in the Somali
Republic earlier this week, according to reports reaching here yester-
day.
BAHIA BLANCA, Argentina-President Jose Maria Guido wished

Indians Lose
Two Posts
Near Border,
Nehru Government
Asks Foreign Aid
NEW DELHI (P)-A 10,000-man
Chinese invasion force was report-
ed driving down a jeep trail from
Towang yesterday 'in a possible
effort to break through the East-
ern Himalayas into India's thick-
ly populated Plains of Assam.
Outnumbered and outgunned In-
dian troops were putting up stiff-
er resistance after a week of heavy
fighting, a Defense Ministry
spokesman said, but two more In-
dian positions were overwhelmed.
Prime Minister Jawaharlal Neh-
ru, whose government has pro-
claimed a state of national emer-
gency, told a delegation of 45 mem-
bers of his Congress Party, India
is making arrangements to match
Communist firepower with arms
from abroad.
Writes to Nations
He said he had written to all
nations, except South Africa and
Portugal with whom India has no
diplomatic relations, explaining
his refusal to enter cease-fire ne-
gotiations with the Red Chinese
unless they pull back to their po-
sitions of Sept. 8.
One such letter went to the So-
viet Union. Premier Nikita S.
Khrushchev is believed here to
have prompted the Red Chinese to
'propose cease-fire talks and a
12'/2-mile pullback by both sides
from present positions.
Nehru declined to name the na-
tions from which India expects
weapons aid. He said India was
making no distinction between
East and West. But it was assum-
ed here that the United States
and Britain would be the chief
suppliers.
Won't Drop Policy
Despite the national emergen-
cy, Nehru is reluctant to abandon
his position of nonalignment in
the cold war by accepting free
arms aid.
A letter from Nehru to President
John F. Kennedy on Friday made
known India's need for arms, but
did not directly ask for aid. State
Department officials already have

See Support
For Change
In Church
VATICAN CITY (M)-Support
seemed to be mounting in the
Roman Catholic Ecumenical Coun-
cil yesterday for steps to allow
greater flexibility in church meth-
ods around the earth.
The new approach would mark
a historic transition in Ecclesias-
tical policy.
No vote on any aspect of the
change has yet been taken at
this worldwide assembly of the
Episcopate and preliminaries have
dragged slowly. After a week of
profuse floor discussions, the
Presidium admonished council
fathers to talk less in order to do
more.
Despite the snail's pace there
are many indications that adjust-
ments are in the making.
The Council still faces more
work on its "scheme" for revamp-
ing rules of ritual.
Communiques, as well as other
information gleaned about the
closed sessions, suggested power-
ful backing -for at least some
relaxation in the presently fixed
practices of the Church.

PARIS (M)-President Charles
de Gaulle faces his stiffest test yet
in a national referendum today
when the French people will say,
in effect, whether they want him
to serve out his term.
About 25 million French voters
will give their verdict on his ad-
ministration with ballots on de
Gaulle's proposed constitutional
amendment for direct election of
his successors.
De Gaulle himself has altered
the issue by proclaiming he will
resign if the proposal is beaten,
or if it wins only what he calls a
"vague and doubtful" majority.
The amendment, which aroused
a political storm throughout
France until it was overshadowed
by the Cuban crisis, would have
future presidents elected by uni-
versal suffrage instead of by an
electoral college of some 80,000
"notables" dominated by the tra-
ditional political parties.
In his closing referendum cam-
paign speech to the nation by ra-
dio and television de Gaulle cited
the Cuban crisis as proof that
France needs a strong executive
to cope with the troubled world
situation.
The referendum is the first of
three ballots which can determine

v

DE GAULLE FACES TEST:
French To Vote on Future

the nation's political future as well
as de Gaulle's.
Next month the voters ballot in
two rounds of general elections to
replace the National Assembly
which de Gaulle dissolved follow-
ing the downfall of the Georges
Pompidou cabinet. To win an As-
sembly seat, an absolute majority
i4 required in the first round, but a
plurality suffices in the runoff
vote one week later.
Like the referendum the nation-
al elections also involve de Gaulle
and the issue of presidential pow-
ers. The Pompidou cabinet was
overthrown on a vote of censure
against de Gaulle's constitutional
reform plan, and this inevitably
will be a factor in the campaign.

. ..

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The middle-road coalition which
unseated Pompidou has just is-
sued a broad joint program which
it says is ready to implement if
de Gaulle does carry through his
avowed intention to resign if the
amendment is beaten or scrapes
through. This was an effort to as-
sure the country that, contrary to
what the Gaullists are saying, the
country would not be plunged into
chaos if the "no" votes muster a
majority today.
The coalition includes the So-
cialist Party, the Popular Repub-
lican Movement, a largely Catholic
and slightly left of center party,
the middle-roading Radical-So-
cialists and the conservative In-
dependent Party.

good luck yesterday to crewman

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BROADWAY POSTSCR[P.T
REPRINTED IN FULL FROM

3aturaay Keview

of the Argentine destroyers Rosales
- , and Espora, scheduled to sail to-
day to assist in the arms blockade
of Cuba. The warships are equip-
ped for anti-submarine warfare.
*. * *
LEOPOLDVILLE - Dr. Ralph
Bunche, United Nations Under
Secretary for Special Policital Af-
fairs, said yesterday the UN would
persist in trying to reunite the
Congo "as long as it keeps its
head above water."
CAPE CANAVERAL-The De-
fense Department yesterday an-
nounced that a satellite will be
launched into a northeast direction
from Cape Canaveral next Tues-
day, presumably to alert Russia
to the fact that it will not be a
hostile rocket aimed in its direc-
tion.
* *

FORMAL OPENING
of The
Town and Campus
Barber Shop
Located in the Maynard Houset
522 E. William-On The Campus
OWNED and OPERATED by "BUD" ROBERTS
employed locally for the past three years. Previously at the
Americana and the Elizabeth Arden Salon in Miami Beach, Fla.
Specializing in Ladies' Hairstyling and catering to the Student
and Businessman, and of course the "Little Folk."
To introduce you to our "Personality Hairstyliing" we make
this SPECIAL "GET ACQUAINTED" OFFER until Nov. 8. This
coupon worth 50c on each hairstyling. We will be pleased to
serve all students and faculty.
i.............i...i.............i...........,
SBring This Coupon With You:
Worth 50e on Our '
CPersonality Hairstyling
Coupon Expires Nov. 8th

The following list indicate some of the books available
to the public in the University. of Michigan General
Library Books may also be obtained from the Baha'i
Library, 1400 Granger St.
UNIVERSITY GENERAL LIBRARY
(Books are found in card catalog under "Baha'ism"
and "Baha'u'llah." In the stacks they are under the BP
360 and BP 365 call area-9th floor north wing.)
Baha'u'llah, Book of Certitude (Kitab-i-lqan, 1950 ed.)
Baha'u'llah, Hidden Words
Baha'u'llah, Prayers and Meditations
Baha'u'llah, Gleanings
Baha'u'llah (and Abdu'l-Baha) Bahi'i World Faith
(Compilation of Sacred Writings)
Baha'u'llah and Abdu'l-Baha, Glad Tidings of Baha'u'llah
(Compilation of Sacred Writings)
'Abdu'l-Baha, The Secret of Divine Civilization
'Abdu'l-Baha, Some Answered Questions
'Abdu'l-Baha and Baha'u'llah, Divine Art of Living
(Compilation)
Shoghi Effendi, The World Order of Baha'u'llah
Shoghi Effendi The Promised Day is Come
Shoghi Effendi, God Passes By
Shoghi Effendi, The Advent of Divine Justice
The following are introductory to the Baha'i Faith:
Esslemont, J. E., Baha'u'llah and the New Era
Ferraby, John, All Things Made New
Townshend, George, Christ and Baha'u'IIah
The Promise of All Ages .
Hoffman, David, The Renewal of Civilization
LEARN ABOUT THE GREAT SPIRITUAL DRAMA
OF THIS NEW AGE

ANN Amon, MiC.
Richard Baldridge's steadily an-
guished concoction of Walt Whitman's
poetic .'incantation, "We, Comrades
Three," can only nominally be called a
play. But the APA repertory company,
in the first of three seasons at the Uni-
versity of Michigan, has produced the '
'drama so stunningly and imaginatively

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that it becomes a visual and emotional
treat. Ann Roth's settings and a superb
cast achieve a new high in quality for a

company that has more continuity than

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most of the professional teatre coi

,.

declared such a request would1
given serious consideration.

be

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panies in our countr

Y.E
-HENRY HEWES.

WASHINGTON- The Atomic
Energy Commission yesterday an-
nounced two nuclear test ex-
plosions, one at Johnston Island
in the Pacific and an underground
blast at the Nevada test site and
also announced a Russian blast.

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SOPH SHOW
8~e &eo &rdie!

BLOCK
TICKET
SALES
Oct. 29- Nov. 2
Thurs. $1.50
Fri. & Sat. $1.75

Calls Romney
'Uninformed'
LANSING UP)-George Romney's
mental health proposals "dem-
onstrate that he is shockingly un-
informed" about the operation of
Michigan's mental health program,
Dr. James'Graves, clinical direc-
tor of the Detroit receiving hos-
pital and a member of the State
Mental Health Commission, said
yesterday.
Graves said. Romney had sug-
gested that the State Department
of Mental Health provide guidance
and assistane for community men-
tal health clinics, that it coor-
dinate programs for training of
all mental health professions, that
it establish professional standards
for the personnel at state hospi-
tals and local clinics and that
there be a free exchange of ideas
on new treatment, techniques, re-
search projects and training pro-
grams.
All these things are now being
done, Graves said.

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Rumor has it

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everyone is going to the
GLEE CLUB CONCERT
" next Saturday night

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Better get your tickets soon. They're

VJ
WISCONSIN
MEN'S GLEE CLUB

I

going fast !

You (and your honey)

,T7'/e ritAic jgilmn 'cie tt
announces
100 subscriptions available for its Fall series

will not want to miss this cultural
(yet collegiate) experience.

I

MICHIGAN

vs.

MEN'S GLEE CLUB.

PERSONAL CINEMA
A series of films illustrating the concept of the motion picture
as the expression of the artist's personal vision.
October 29
F. W. MURNAU'S
NOSFERATU
A poetic evocation of the supernatural by the creator of THE
LAST LAUGH and SUNRISE. In a recent poll of French film
critics, Murnauwas selected as the greatest director in the
history of the cinema.
November 19

December 10

D. W. GRIFFITH'S
BROKEN BLOSSOMS
Certainly the most personal, and perhaps the greatest, of the
films by the creator of BIRTH OF A NATION and INTOLER-
ANCE. Starring Lillian Gish.
January 14
JEAN COCTEAU'S
LES PARENTS TERRIBLES
Tangled family relationships examined with overwhelming in-
tensity by one of the most individual of all film makers.

ON STAGE IN HILL AUDITORIUM

I

Two Concerts: 7:00 and 9:30, Sat., Nov.

3

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FU

IM

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