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October 27, 1962 - Image 6

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The Michigan Daily, 1962-10-27
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PAGE FOUR

THE MICHIGAN DlAILY

SATURAY, CTOBR 27 196

SATURDAY- ACTARF.R 27. MOM

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

s s. L x v i s i s x i1AIL inALA AL1. 'U L %JJ D ')'Y4-,O1FI0

i

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 27, 1962 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Gopher Coach Successful]

By BILL BULLARD
Out of the fire and into the pot.
That's the way you might de-
scribe Murray Warmath's coach-
ing career since he took over at
Minnesota in 1954.
When Warmath became coach,
Minnesota was at low tide. In the
Post World War II era, the Goph-
ers had played only mediocre foot-
ball in the Big Ten, compiling an
even .500 record. It wasn't good
enough for the energetic Minne-
sota alumni who looked back to
the pre-war teams that were na-
tional powerhouses.
And the fact of the matter was
the many alumns didn't believe
Warmath was the man to lead the
Gophers back to the top. After all,
Minnesota had been national
champions five times in the per-
iod from 1934 to 1941, and 11
Gophers were All-Americans.
Some alumni were plainly skep-
tical of Warmath's qualifications.
The belief was that Athletic Di-
rector Ike Armstrong had made
a mistake in not during Charles
"Bud" Wilkinson away from Ok-
lahoma.
Dissatisfaction Grows
Wilkinson had been an All-
America guard for Minnesota in
1935 and as the former Gopher
star developed his nationally
ranked teams in the early. and
mid-fifties, dissatisfaction with
Warmath grew.
In his initial season Warmath
fashioned a 7-2 record, but things
immediately grew worse again. In
1958 Minnesota won only one and
a year later were victorious only
twice. The pressure on Warmath
grew intense.
The 49-year-old Tennessean was
hung in effigy. He and his family
Were repeatedly threatened and
terrorized by anonymous telephone
calls, and alumni demanded his
resignation.
Since then, however, the fire
has subsided and the pot in Goph-
erland has grown warm.
Rose from Depths

Army to become line coach under
Earl Blaik for three seasons. His
first head coaching job was at
Mississippi State where his 1952
and 1953 teams had a combined
record of 10-6-3.
His experience as a line coach
was to benefit him in building the
solid offensive and defensive lines
that were to characterize the 1960,
1961, and 1962 Minnesota squads.
His emphasis on contact and stiff
line play was to make the Gophers
one of the roughest and toughest
teams in the country.
Has Great Season
As the 1960 season proceeded,
many people could not believe it
as Minnesota racked up victory
after victory. When the win streak

had reached six, the Gophers were
scheduled to play No. 1 ranked
Iowa at Minneapolis. In one of the
classic games seen at Memorial
Stadium, the Minnesota squad top-
pled Iowa from the top of the na-
tionad rankings with a 27-10 de-
feat. Now Minnesota was on top.
Washington stunned the Goph-
ers at the 1961 Rose Bowl game
17-7. But the next season, War-
math won that final honor which
had eluded him. After a 6-1 Big
Ten season last fall, the Gophers
were selected to represent the Big
Ten in the Rose Bowl because
champion Ohio State wasn't allow-
ed to go. This time victory did not
escape Warmath. Minnesota hand-
ed UCLA a 21-3 setback.

SINCE 1903:
Brown Jug Battle
Is 59- Years Old

1 eeks New Bi

Ten O

i

Ii

'I

Minnesota Individual Statistics

1'

Munsey
Jones
Sharp
Cairns
Fischer
Enga
McMillan
Blaska
Pelletier
Crockett
Ramseth
Hankinson
Sadek

RUSHING
Att. G
41 151
32 139
12 98
21 85
20 81
20 59
6 30
23 87
10 30
3 21
1 9
1 0
3 1

L
9
6
0
1
4
6
0
57
3
0
0
7
11

Net
142
133
98
84
77
53
30
30
27
21
9
-7
-10

TD
0
2
1
0
0
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
0

Blaska
Sadek
Hankinson

PASSING
Att. Co. Int.
64 32 6
7 2 0
1 0 0

Yds.
412
26
0

PASS RECEIVING
Ca

Rognlie
Cairns
Campbell
Fischer
Jones
Prawdzik
Zitzloff
Pelletier
Enga
Crockett

In one year Warmath rose from
the depths, rebuilding his last
place team of 1959 to a 1960 na-
tional champion. The Gophers tied
for the Big Ten title and War-
math was "Coach of the Year."
The husky Warmath had two
football greats as his teachers. He
played for Gen. Bob Neyland at
Tennessee from 1932 to 1934 and
was an assistant under Neyland
for the next -four seasons. He was
also an assistant at Tennessee
from 1945-49.
After leaving Tennessee for the
second time, Warmath went to

ught Yds.
7 101
6 110
5 36
4 51
4 32
3 37
2 31
1 18
1 11
1 11
No. Yds.
2 37
2 19
1 0

TD
3
0
0
TD
1
1
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
TD
0
0
0

Avg.
3.5
4.2
8.2
4.0
3.9
2.7
5.0
1.3
2.7
7.0
9.0
Pet.
.500
.290
.000
Avg.
14.4
18.3
7.2
12.7
8.0
12.3
15.5
18.0
11.0
11.0
Avg.
18.5
9.5
0.0
Avg.
37.8
49.0

By GARY WINER"
School gridiron traditions go
back a long way and memories
are perpetuated each year by the
fights for symbolic emblems.
Purdue and Indiana meet each
year to play for the Old Oaken
Bucket, while Iowa and Minneso-
ta meet for possession of Floyd of
Rosedale, a bronze pig. But it's
Michigan and Minnesota who do
battle each year for the most well-
known representative of football
glory-the Little Brown Jug.
Popular Story
Although the popular story has
it that the battle for the jug orig-
inated when a Michigan team acci-
dentally left a water bucket at
Minneapolis some years ago and
had to beat the Gophers the fol-
lowing year to retrieve it, the real
story is revealed by Oscar Mun-
son, Gopher equipment manager at
the time.
Some 59 years ago Fielding H
Yost took one of his Michigan
point-a-minute teams to Minne-
apolis to play a lowly regarded
hometown squad. Minnesota put
up a valiant fight with the contest
culminating in a 6-6 tie. The tale
reveals that Yost threw the piece
of crockery away in sheer disgust.
Munson happened upon the dis-
carded bucket and gave it to Doc
Cooke (head man in the equip-
ment room) to hang above his
desk, and there it remained un-
noticed for six years.
Yost Returns
In 1909 Yost returned to Minne-
apolis for another game, saw the
jug, and he and Cooke decided to
award it to the winner of that
year's game. Michigan won 15-6
and took the bucket back to Ann
Arbor, thus starting a tradition.

The jug was broken one year,
so Yost and Munson each went out
and bought another; but Munson's
resembled the original more close-
ly, so that is the jug which is still
used today.
Originally being a solid white,
the jug is now colored blue and
maroon with identical block M's
on each side. Just exactly how it
was named the "Little Brown Jug,,
nobody seems to really know.
Determine Champion
Many times the outcome of this
game has determined the confer-
ence champion or established na-
tional ranking. Six times the win-
ner has been decided by one point,
and 19 times the victor was ahead
by a mere touchdown.
Last year's game was the closest
since 1958 when Michigan upset
Minnesota, 20-19.
Last Time
The last time Michigan won was
in 1959, another upset score of
14-6.
Some of the bigger scores occur-
red in 1943 and 1951 when Michi-
gan won, 49-6, and 54-27, respec-
tively. The biggest wiz~ by the
Gopher's was in 1935, 40-0.
Looking back over the record,
many players claim that the 1947
tilt at Ann Arbor was about the
greatest one ever played. Michi-
gan, led by All American quarter-
back Bob Chappius and halfback
Bump Elliott, had already rolled
over four opponents that season.
Gophers Underdogs
The Gophers were underdogs,
but their strong line anchored by
fearsome Leo Nomellini gave the
Wolverines a run for their money.
The Maize and Blue finally tri-
umphed, 13-6, and went onto an
undefeated season including a 49-
0 victory over Southern Califor-
nia in the Rose Bowl.
Once again the jug will be up for
grabs this afternoon. Minnesota is
highly favored (so much so that
there is speculation that they
aren't even bringing the bucket
with them), but a little old time
glory and tradition could creep in-
to Michigan's game. Who knows
what could happen then?
Tough Defense
Minn. Opp.
First Downs 62 38
No. Rushing Attempts 194 154
Net Yds. Gained Rush. 66 168
Passing Attempts 72 99
Completed 34 48
Intercepted 6 5
Net Yds. Gained Pass. 438 606
No. Plays Rush & Pass 266 253
Total Offense Ydg. 1104 774
Fumbles 7 9
Balls Lost 4 5

By JIM BERGER
Both offensively and defensive-
ly Michigan appears to be the sick-
est in the Big Ten.
Not only have the Wolverines
managed to score no points in'
their two Conference encounters,
but the opposition has scored 65.
This is an average of 32.5 points
per game.
In Michigan's last two games
they haven't been inside the op-,
position's 10 yard line. Their best
advance against MSU was to the
18 and against Purdue to the 22.
In these two Conference games
Purdue and Michigan State have
chalked up 37 first downs while
the Blue has had but 17. In to-
tal yardage the opposition has
chalked up 872 yds. against Mich-;
igan's 202.
How Low Is Low1
Individually, the Wolverines
look even worse offensively. Sen-
ior halfback Dave Raimey has
managed to pick up 59 yds. in the'
two games, and he is Michigan's
biggest gun. Quarterback Bob
Timberlake, Michigan's s e c o n d
leading rusher, has picked up 13
yds. in the two games.
As for passing Michigan has at-;
tempted 35 and completed 11.1
These 11 completions were good'
for 87 yds. or an average of 8.6.1
Michigan's passing percentage is
30.2.
The defense has not been able
to show either success in stopping
the ground game of Michigan
State or the passing game of Pur-
due. Michigan now resides in the
bottom of the Big Ten standings
Just Gaining Momentum

and is heading for its worst season
since the middle 30's.
True, Michigan has p 1 a y e d
against two of the Big Ten's best
but the season won't be any rosier.
Minnesota is not a great team
this season but a respectable one.
The Gophers boast a perennially
powerful defense and an adequate
offense.
Their two tackles are rated to be
among the best in the Conference
as well as the country. An exper-
ienced backfield spotlighted by
quarterback Duane Blaska who
I has shown himself to be a better
passer than his predecessor, All-
American Sandy Stephens.
The Gophers haven't been scor-
ed on in three of their four games,
and Michigan hasn't scored in its
last two. What are the bets that
the Wolverines are going to score
today?
On Wisconsin
After Minnesota, Michigan hosts
Wisconsin, another of this year's l
Big Ten powers. Not as good a
defensive team as the Gophers,
the Badgers will bring a passing
offense sparked by All-American
end Pat Richter. The Badger's
scored a big 42-14 win over Iowa
last week to establish themselves. i
Today they play Ohio State and
the result will be significant.
What was counted on to be a
breather just might be the closest
game of the season for the Wol-
verines. Illinois will visit Ann Ar-
bor in two weeks. The Illini haven't
won a game in two years.
Showing improvement in every
game, the Illini lost by only 17
to the Gophers last week.
Finished Off

86-Lothner
87--Zitzloff
80-Campbell
RE

73-Schwantz
70-Nord
78-Bell
RT

68-Fron
62-Kehl
63-Perkovich
RG

53-Marchlewski 67-Rabel
55-Pung 60-Constanza
54--Benson 33--Hook

C

LE
86-Brown
82-Conley
80--Farabee

LT
79-Keating
92-McAleer
73-Schram

LG
62-inko
65-Hahn
77-Butler

C
58-Muir
55-Green
59-Blanchard
QB
28-Timberlake
26-Evashevski
20-Chandler
FB
33-Sparkman
38-Dodd
37-Anthony

RG
63-Kurtz
61-Marcum
64-Szymanski

LH
42-Strobel
46-Chapman
21-Prichard

36-sharp
35-Enga
38-Jones

MINNESOTA
Three-Deep Lineup
MICHIGAN

11-Pelletier
47-McMillan
29-Cairns
RH

FB
16-Hankinson
14-Sadek
12-Blaska
QB

Total Points
First Downs
Rushing
Passing
Penalty
Total Net Yards
Total No. Plays
Rushing Attempts
Yards Gained '
Yards Lost
Net Yards
Passing Attempts
Completions
Net Yards
Interceptions
Punt Returns-Yds. '
Number
Kickoff Returns-Yds.
Number
Punts
Average Distance
Fumbles
Ball Lost
Penalties
Yards Lost'

30
49
34
10
5
792
264
198
733
172
561
66
25
231
3
28
11
308
20
27
34
11
9
26
223

97
66
40
21
5
1340
258
198
974
78
896
60
27
444
7
182
20
170
8
12
34
15
9
24
197

Michigan finishes up its sched-
ule on the road traveling first to
Iowa and then to Ohio State. The
Hawkeyes have a proven passer
in Matt Szykowny and although
they don't appear to be the most
powerful of Iowa teams, Michigan
won't be favored.
Ohio State took a hard loss to
Northwestern last weekend, but a
few bad breaks doesn't mean an
unsuccessful season for Woody
Hayes. OSU had two touchdowns
called back and Northwestern had
to come from behind in the final
quarter to eventually win.
Again, with two losses, this
doesn't appear to be the best of
Woddy Hayes teams. But it IS a
Woody Hayes team.
Purdue Coach Jack Mollenkopf
said after last Saturday's game
that he thinks Michigan will win
one game. Maybe the Wolverines
can really get up for Illinois.

11

Michigan Individual Statistics
(Season)

LG

RUSHING
Att. G L Net TD Ave.

Raimey ...
Timberlake
Evashevski
Strobel ....
Sparkman
Rindfuss
Prichard

.. 56
.. 43
.. 16
.. 13
. .. . .. 12
12
. 11

INTERCEPTIONS

232
164
46
43
52
35
28,
66
38
9
12
8
0

25
87
32
6
1
5
3
1
1
1
3
0
7

207
77
16
37
51
30
25
65
37
8
9
.8
-7

1
0
0
1
0
1
0
0
1
0
0
0
0

3.7
1.8
0.9
2.8
4.3
2.5
2.3
6.5
4.6
1.1
1.5
2.7
-7.0

Ramseth
Munsey
Cairns

Dodd ............10
Glinka ...........8
Anthony .........7

i

PA
Kocan..........
Strobel..........
Raimey..........
Chapman........
Ward...........
Laskey..........
Prichard
Farabee
Brown..........
Conley..........
Hood...........
Totals.......
Timberlake.......
Glinka..........
Evashevski......
Chandler........
Prichard........

Chapman .

...... 6.

PUNTING
No.
22
1

Jones
Skjej

Yds.
831
49

Hood ...........
Chandler ........
Totals1

3
1

198 733 172 561

4 2.8

THE OLE' GRAD KNOWS
- the SHOP (
to STOP
isr
MOE'S
rl - for

PUNTING
O'Donnell .....................26 896

34.4

Rindfuss ....................... 1

23 23.0

DON BLASKA
. . . Gopher quarterback

Totals ....................27 919

34.0

Totals

U

BLANKETS
SWEAT SHIRT
and for the youngster
'M'-SWEATERS and JACKETS
Sweat Shirts -Play Suits -Bibs

PENNANTS
IS
s
GO BLUEr

POPGUN OFFENSE-Michigan halfback Dave Raimey (19) rips
off he yardage as he roars through a gaping hole in the opponent's
line and sharply cuts back to follow his blockers, preptred to
mow down the secondary. Leading the interference is Grandma
Moses.

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71

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Liberty at Division

Organized 1890

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