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October 25, 1962 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-10-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY. OrTARF.R !& i4a

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TELEVISION:
Grassmuck Analyzes 1960 Debates

By PHILIP SUTIN
A successful television debate, by
itself, will not boost a candidate
to victory, but a failure can cost
an election, Prof. George Grass-
muck of the political science de-
partment observed recently.
Deno Predicts
Drug Future
In one of the five talks in the
annual "Pharmacy Lectures" series
held yesterday, Prof. Richard A.
Deno of the pharmacy college pre-
dicted that natural drugs - those
derived from plants, animals or
micro-organisms - will continue
to supply much of man's medi-
cines.
The natural- drugs range from
vitamins, antibiotics and morphine
to folk medicines with "only a re-
cently-achieved scientific respec-
tability," such as Indian snake-
root which aids high blood pres-
sure victims.

An aide to former Vice-Presi-
dent Richard M. Nixon in the 1960
debates with then Sen. John F.
Kennedy (D-Mass), Prof. Grass-
muck noted that candidates face
many problems in such an en-
counter.
"The problem is the amount of
special preparation required, The
candidate finds that he has to rely
on his memory for a lot of isolated
facts which may or may not get
used," he noted.
Nixon Unprepared
Prof. Grassmuck denied reports
in Theodore White's The Making
of a President, 1960, that Nixon
was unprepared for his first de-
bate with Kennedy.
He said that he and other
campaign aides prepared a file of
difficult questions which might
occur in the debate and their
answers. Like Kennedy and his
special assistant, Theodore Soren-
son, Nixon spent the day of the
debate reviewing his set of notes,
Prof. Grassmuck explained.
Kennedy' succeeded in winning
the first debate by sticking to one
message and continuously re-em-
phasizing it, no matter what the
question was, he asserted.

The President kept emphasizing
'we must get the country moving
again' and that he was dissatisifed
with current conditions, Prof.
Grassmuck continued.
The Nixon forces, noted that
tactic after the first debate and
the former vice-president at-
tempted to use a similar technique
in the following debates, he added.
Effect Overrated
Although the effect of the tele-
vision debates has been overrated,
Prof. Grassmuck declared, it had
some important campaign bene-
fits. "The.debates made everyone
a participant in campaigns. This
effect was not limited to votersor
adults-even children were quite
intensely interested."
The debates also mobilized party
workers, "the skirmishers in the
front lines." A good debate ex-
hilarated party workers and made
them enthusiastic," he said.
Sawson Enterprises Presents

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DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
(Continued from Page 4) Employers desirous of hiring students Full-time or 20 hrs. per week.
for part-time or full-time temporary 1-Short-order-cook. Must have exper-
work, should contact Bob Hodges, Part- fence. The hours would be flexible.
view Liberal Arts najors-esp. those time Interviewer at NO 3-1511. ext. 3553. Transportation necessary.
with econ. & math majors for same Students desiring miscellaneous odd 2-3-Orderlies. Must be college students
trng. course. Interviews will be held at jobs should consult the bulletin board willing to work below college level.
Bus. Ad. Placement Office (220 Bus. Ad. in Room 2200, daily. Full - time permanent position.
Bldg.). MALE Hours: 3:15-11:30 pm., Mon. thru
-Several Odd jobs posted on the bul- Fri.
P~it' lert letin board in this office. FEMALE
1-To teach gymnastics on a part-time 1-Hat check girl. Hours: 12 noon to 6
permanent basis. Hours would be p.m. Would need transportation.
flexible. (Outside Ann Arbor.)
Em-ye t-Several sales positions. 1-To take care of 2 children, age 5
The following part-time jobs are 2-Electrical Engineers. Must be at and 8, would have full care of the
availanle. Applications for these jobs least a Jr. or Sr. with a 3.00, or house. Hours: 11 a.m.-4 p.m., Mon.
can be made in the Part-time Placement above, grade point. Must have. Se- thru Fri. Could live in if desired.
Office, 2200 Student Activities Bldg., curity Clearance. 20 hours per week. City bus runs by the house.
during the following hours: Mon. thru 1-Auto-Mechanic. Will be doing ma- 1-To baby sit and do ironing on
Fri. 8 a.m. til 12 noon and 1:30 til 5 jor repairs mainly with trucks, in- weds. only. Hours: 9:15-1 p.m. pre-
p.m. cluding welding. Must have training. ferred, 11:30 would be satisfactory.
BUY THE
STUDENT
DIRE CTORY
ON SALE
TODAY AND TOMORROW
$1.00
DIAG " UNION : ENGINE ARCH
{'

i~A
4 1,,4
,p E tiNI5
C3U

u5. V%4%%V% The
ROUNDTABLE
114 West Liberty 665-3414
8 A.M. to 8 P.M.
NO LIQUOR SERVED
Features complete homecooked
meals as low as one dollar
Hot pork or beef sandwiches.
gravy and potatoes.....70c
Homemade soup .......20c
,A ' srA" s ~"p' A4;~~ 41. 4 S : ':. :I. "n ':."?: :s'"{1 ':W.1 .:}: '':":S".:.v......s.:s.{. "...a.:"......

JOAN
BAEZ
In Concert
ALEX PAYLINI, Emcee
Wed., Nov. 7, 8:15 P.M.
FORD AUDITORIUM
Tickets at-Grinnell's (Downtown).
Marwil's Northland and Eastland.
$3.75, $3.00, $2.25, $1.75.

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I

Ele phant H
3:15 P.M. DVN DI
FRIDAY SKY DIVING PREU
Pilot Bruce Gordan
Divers Fred Allen
Allen Beach
Bob Rediwick
3:30 P.M.
FRIDAY Intracollegiate Race
RACES ELEPHANT
1. Sprint 1. Sigma Delt
2. Reciprocal Obstacle kitchen cre
3. Diamond Relay 2. Hinsdale, J
3. Couzens, C
4. Mary Marl<
5. Delta U., E
Pi Beta Ph
Soro rs is
6. Alice Lloyd
4:30 P.M.
FRIDAY Half Time Twist Co
with ROADRUNNERS
5:00 P.M.
FRIDAY InterCOllegiate Race

acomin rrogra
Theme: Sing along with Mich.
FRIDAYPARADETURDAYMUD BOWL G
cStart at Markley -to Ug-to Union- On Sigma Alpha Epsilon (So'
to Ferry Field Sigma Alpha Epsilon vs. Phi E
Plus soccer: Kappa Alpha Thi
Plus Mud Bowl Queen
UDE FRIDAY PEP RALLY at Ferry Field
Michigan BandSAURDAYTUG OF WAR
Michigan Cheerleaders At Island Park
M.C. Ralph Watts Jr. Gomberg vs. Taylor
Amblers
Coach Elliott and Team 11:30 A.M.
Bob Westfall SATURDAY Chariot Race
Series Whitey Wistert On Diag
SPONSORS Friars Brandy (Delta U) vs. O
Tommy Roberts
to Ta u
3-,i,1:30 P.M. I *
WSATURDAY MiCnigan vs. M
ordan 9:3AP.M. YELL LIKE HELL CONTEST In Michigan Stadium
.hicagoIFRIDAY
kley CONTESTANTS:
Seta Theta Pi 1. Newberry, Huber S TUP.M. Phi Psi Le Man
1, CllegateSATURDAY
i, Collegiate 2. Pi Beta Phi, Kappa Sigma (Go-Kart Race)
3. Hinsdale, Michigan On Phi Kapp Psi lawn (H
4. Phi Kappa Psi, Delta Gamma Entry from each Sororit
5. Alpha Delta Pi, Sigma Pi Epsilon Sponsors: Chio 0, Delta U.
ntest 6. Tau Delta Phi, Delta Phi Epsilon Epsilon
BONFIRE 8:30 P.M. BOB NEWHAR
Series plus DON JACOBY SEX
At Hill AudAitorium

lAME
uth U. & Washtenaw)
Delta Theta
eta vs. Collegiate Sorosis

x (Theta Zsi)
innesota

s

ill & Washtenaw)
Gamma Phi Beta; Phi

T
TET

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