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October 20, 1962 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-10-20

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

rAaE

THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE FIVE

HEALTH SERVICE:
Cold Germs Hit Campus
To Plague 'U' Students

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

For Direct Classified Ad Service, Phone NO 2-4786
from 1:00 to 3:00 P.M. Monday through Friday, and Saturday 9:30 'tiI 11:30 A.M.

(Continued from Page 2)

By BARBARA SCHWARTZ
With the coming of September,
thousands of students from all
over the country flock to the
University campus, bringing with
them the desire for knowledge and
the cold germ.
"Every year starts off with a
bang!" Dr. Morley Beckett, direc-
tor of Health Service says. Each
September, upper respiratorial in-
fections reach all corners of the
cahipus, steadily increasing as the
month progresses and reaching
a peak by October.
"This October is the highest
month for colds every year," ac-
cording to Dr. Beckett. The rea-
son these infections are so wide-
spread and travel so quickly is
that students are brought in close
contact in dormitories, classes and
Just walking on campus, he says.
Close Quarters
The cold germ is extremely con-
tagious and spreads like wildfire
in situations where people are liv-
ing in such close quarters, Dr.
Beckett explains.
"By October, students have had
a chance to spread the bug
around."
According to Health Service rec-
ords, the number of upper res-
Abrams Cites
Flksingin ' s
Past, Future
By MICHAEL 'HYMAN
"The Folklore Society was form-
ed by people of mutual interest
who wanted to do something more
programmatic," Howard Abrams,
'62, president of the society, says..
It meets every second Thursday
in the Michigan League, the Mich-
igan Union, or co-ops, and was
organized five years ago by Wil-
liam McAdoo, Bruce Bevelheimer
and Barry Merenoff.
Belonging to the National Folk
Music Council, the society's facul-
ty advisor is Prof. Victor Meisel
of the history of art department.
Authentic Songs
Though it is a folklore society,
Abrams says it is mostly concern-
ed with folk music, the ethnic
and authentic folk songs of the
southern mountain and blues
music.
The group is engaged in many
activities, and has brought to
campus in past years such artists
as Bob Dylan, Jesse Fuller, Frank
Hamilton, and the Limeliters.
The society is the first group in
the country to foster a workshop
-C'
HOWARD ABRAMS
.. . scussesfolk music
program, he says. Every Saturday
afternoon in SAB, more advanced
/ members give free lessons on an

informal, seminar basis to those
members who wish to play the
guitar, the banjo or the mandolin.
Weekend Orgy
On April 19-21, the society will
sponsor the Folk Music Festival,
"a weekend orgy in folk music."
On Nov. 10, the society will pre-
sent Jesse Fuller in Trueblood
Aud., and in March there will be
a folk music .concert for the Crea-
tive Arts Festival.
Although the group is informal,
it also plans to hold other events,
such as the annual Christmas-
Channukah sing and folksing pic-
nic in late May, he reported.
Folkways Magazine,' w h o s e
basic circulation is in New York
and Chicago, is the group's pub-
lication.
Artistic Validity

DR. MORLEY BECKETT
cold analysis

piratory infection diagnoses for
September of this year is- much
higher than last year at the same
time. There were 367 cases re-
ported last September as com-
pared to this year's high of 603.
"But," Dr. Beckett says, "there
has been no alarming epidemic of
any special disease and no influ-
enza outbreak as yet."
Another Series
He predicts from past out-
breaks that if influenza does
strike, it will come early in the
new year. Over 7600 immuniza-
tions against influenza have been
given already by Health Service,
and early in November another
serifs will be given.
The Health Service Pharmacy
broke its record this year for total
number of prescriptions filled:
4,573 prescriptions. "This is the
highest number dispensed in the
history of Health Service for the
month of September," Dr. Beck-
ett notes.
In view of these figures, Dr.
Beckett has an optimistic outlook.
He said that if these figures are
high now they usually are lower
for the rest of the year.
Showes Aims
In Colleg es
By ROBERT SELWA
Paul Potter, Grad., spoke on
"The Aims of Education" at a
conference of 35 liberal activists
at Oberlin College this past week-
end.
The conference, sponsored by
the Progressive Student League,
dealt with a wide range of ques-
tions, including the machinery of
educational policy formation, cur-
riculum formation and control,
social regulations, student living
conditions, academic standards,
student economic welfare, college
employment policies and wage
scales, and intellectual and per-
sonal freedom.
Potter, national affairs vice-
president of the United States
National Student Association this
past year, and a graduate of Ober-
lin, told the conference that the
aims of education "are related
quite closely to the whole aca-
demic process.
Radical Thinking
"To make these aims meaningful
and to achieve them, we have to
think radically," he said. "We
have to deal with serious questions
such as juvenile delinquency or
Cuba in a serious way.
"The current social-economic-
political system deals with many
such problems in a truncated, su-
perficial, incomplete way. And
this method of analysis is the
operative system of higher edu-
cation today."
Potter- said yesterday that he
sensed that the problem at Ober-
lin is that the students there do
not feel that they are fulfilling
themselves as human beings. They
are not growing academically or
personally; the college has good
teachers, but the curriculum is
remote and does not touch the
real problems of today. Potter
added that this is the case at
many universities.
Opportunity to Talk
The conference, he noted, was
designed to give the student lead-
ers at Oberlin "an opportunity to
talk concretely about their res-
ponsibilities, to organize creatively
and to concentrate widespread and
growing discontent in the student
body about the quality of educa-
tion at Oberlin and the process of
policy determination."
The group advocated greater
student participation in policy
Smaking, Potter said.

Charles Fisher and Eugene
Bossart, pianists: Hill Aud.
General Notices
The Greenhouses of the Univ. of Mich.
Botanical Gardens will be open to visi-
tors on Sun. afternoon, Oct. 21 from 3
to 5 p.m. This is in addition to the
regular visiting hours of 8 to 5, Mon.
through Fri.
Regents' Meeting: Fri., Nov. 16. Com-
munications for consideration at this
meeting must be in the President's
hands not later than Nov. 2 (two weeks
in advance of the meeting).
Whitely Foundation S;Scholarships:
Students who live in Ingham County
and who are studying in the fields of
business, education, pre-law, and psy-
chology are elgble to: compete for a
John andElizabeth WhitelymFoundation
Scholarship. Further information may
be obtained at the Scholarship Office,
2011 Student Activities Bldg. Applica-
tions are due by Nov. 1.
Physical Education-Women Students:
Students completing the physical ed.
requirement who were medically defer-
red for the first season, may register
for the second seasonin Barbour Gym-
nasium. Registration may be done in
Office 15, Barbour Gym between 8:00
and 12:00, 1:00 and 5:00 (except Sat.
before Thurs., Oct. 25.
Faculty, College of Architecture and
Design: The Freshman five-week prog-
ress reports (all grades) are to be sent
to Room 207 Arch. Bldg. (Dean's Of-
fice) before 5:00 p.m., Tues., Oct. 23.
CORRECTION: Lecture sponsored by
Dept. of Anthropology on Oct. 24 at
4:15 is to be in Aud. C, Angel Hall, in-
stead of Aud. D as originally scheduled.
Lecture is by A. A. Gebrands of The
Netherlands.
Summary of Action Taken by Student
Government Council at Its Meeting of
October 17, 1962
Adopted: Adopted the Credentials and
Rules Committee Procedures as fol-
lows:
1) The committee shall 'convene fol-
lowing the closing of petitioning to
examine the signatures on candidates'
petitions and determine eligibility of
the candidate beyond academic eligibil-
ity.
2) It shall convene the day previous
to the frst regular meeting following
elections to prepare the certification of
members-elect to Student Government
Council.
3) It shall be convened by the chair-
man upon request by any single mem-
ber to hear questions of rules viola-
tion.
4) A candidate shall be calledbefore
the committee atng as a hearing
board after one member of the com-
mittee requests that a hearing be held,
and a signed complaint has been pre-
sented to the Committee in writing that
any infraction of the petition or elec-
tion rules has been committed by the
candidate and/or hisaagent(s). e Co -
5) The Credentials and Rules Com-
mittee shall consider complaints of
petitioning violations until 12:00 Mid-
night, Mon., Nov. 5. Subsequent to this,
all petitions not ruled invalid will be
considered valid and no further action
concerning petitions will be undertaken.
6) A quorum shall consist of %/s of
the members and no hearings shall be
held without such a quorum.
7) The Credentials and Rules Commit-
tee,having decided to hold a hearing,
. shall; .
a) Hold a1l hearings in public, unless
the accused candidate requests they
be closed.
b) Require one of the complaintants
to appear at the hearing.
c) Retire into Executive session for
Sdeliberation.
d) Offer the candidate in question
the right to:
I) request the presence of witnesses
and/or such person(s) who will ad-
vise or aid him in presenting his side
of the discussion;
II) question the complaintant(s)
8 Y Upon hearing the candidate and
reviewing the evidence of the complain-
ing party the Credentials and Rules
Committee shall determine:
a) What are the facts?
b) Was there a violation?
c) If so, what was the intent of the
violation?
d)What are the consequences of the
violation?
e) What action shall be taken?
The preceding five points shall be con-
sidered in the .order given. Other cri-
teria may be adopted in regard to a
specific case if they are adopted before
Shearings commence.
9) At the discretion of the Credentials
and Rules Committee, based on the fac-
tors present in a particular case, the
Committee may take one or more of the
following:
a) Take no action: b) disqualify the
candidate from seeking election; c) rec-
ommend to Student Government Coun-
cil that the candidate not be seated;
d) refer the candidate and/or related
violator(s) to Joint Judiciary Council
for disciplinary action.
10) All actions of the Credentials and
Rules Committee involving violations of
the rules are subject to review by SGC
Events

Choral Concert: The Univ. of Mich,
All-State High School Choir conducted
by Weston Noble, the Univ. Choir con-
ducted by Maynard Klein, and the Univ.
of Mich. Men's Glee Club conducted by
SPhilip Duey, will present a concert on
Sun., Oct. 21, 2:30 p.m. in Hill Aud. This
program sponsored by the University's
School of Music is open to the public
with no admission charge.
Placement
ANNOUNCEMENTS:
Attention: Seniors & grad students --
Shell pevelopment Co. will be here
Fri., Oet. 26 to interview Physics PhD
candidates-men & women-for Re-
search & Development. Locations: Tex-
as, Calif., Ill. & N.J. Call General Div.,
Bureau of Appointments, 3200 SAB, Ext.
t3544 for an appointment.
National Security Agency Professional
Qualification Test--Test will be given ir
Ann Arbor on Dec. 8, & applicants wil
be accepted only until Nov. 23. To take
rtest must be '.S. citizen. & have BA 0r
BS, or expect to receive it by June '63,
Interviews will be held at Bureau o:
Appointments in Feb. only for those

students who have taken the test. Math,
Physics & Engrg. candidates need not
take the exam.
New York State Dept. of Civil Service
-Professional Career Test will be given
on Dec. 1. Tests will be held at several
locations throughout the country, prob-
ably including Ann Arbor. N.Y. state
residence not required for careers in
Public Admin., Math & Stat., Law, Ed-
uc., Social Work, Commerce, Industry,
Public Rels., Library Work, etc. Also
may take exam for the Public Admin.
Internship Prog. This will be given same
day as Prof. Career Test. May apply if
have MA in Pub. Admin., Poli, Sci.,
Govt., etc. or MA any field with 18 hrs.
pertinent to govt. admin. Oppor. for
grad study in public admin. Apply by
Nov. 2 for both exams.
TEACHER PLACEMENT:
The following schools have listed
teaching vacancies for the school year
1962-1963:
Michigan Center, Mich.-HS Enki.
'Monroe, Mih.-Jr. HS Math; Voc.
I~raft., Trade & Ind. Coord.-Available
now.
Plymouth, Mich.--Jr. HS Home Ec.-
Avalable now
W allingford, Conn. - HS Ind. Arts,
Home Ec,
Harrison, N.Y. (Union Free School
District No. 6)-Jr. HS Art-2nd Se-
mester.
Dayton, Ohio (Oakwood City School
Dist.)-HS Latin/Engl.-Immediately.
ENGINEERING PLACEMENT INTER-
VIEWS-Seniors & grad students, please
sign interview schedule posted at 128-H
W. Engrg.
OCT. 23-
Arthur Andersen & Co., Locations
throughout U.S.-BS-MS: IE or other,
preferably with MBA. Nationals of Great
Britain, France or S. America with some
accounting. Consulting in Operations
Res., Prod. Control, Mgmt. Sei.
Belot Corp., Beloit, Wis., Downing-
town, Pa., Pittsfield, Mass.-BS-MS:
ChE, EE & ME. Feb. grads. R. & D.
Des., Sales & application.
Hazeltine Corp., Long Island, N.Y. and
Tech. Dev. Ctr., Ind., Ind.-Ai Degrees:
EE. MS-PhD: Commun. Sci. BS: E Phys-
ics & ME. Feb. & June grads. Men &
Women. R. & D., Des., Space Commun.,
Res. Study Progs., Publications Engrg.,
Field Engrg.
Pure Oil Co., Newark & Toledo, Ohio;
Beaumont, Tex. & Lemont, Il.-BS-MS:
ChE, EE & ME. Feb. grads. Refining
Div.
OCT. 23-24-
Douglas Aircraft Co., Inc., Aircraft
Div~, Missile & Space Sys. Div.-Al
Degrees: AE & Astro., CE, EE, EM, ME.
MS-PhD: ChE, Met. & Nuclear & Comm.
Sci., & Instrumentation, Math & Phys-
ics. Prof.: Applied 1Viech. BS: E Math
& Sci. Engrg. Feb. grads. Men & Women.
R. & D., Des., & Test.
Motorola, Inc., Chicago, Ill. & Phoe-
nix, Ariz.-BS-MS: EE. BS: E Physics.
Feb. & June grads. R. & D., Des.
POSITION OPENINGS: .
U.S. Dept. of State, Foreign Service-
Positions for Women: 1) Secretary. 2)
Clerk-Stenographer. For both positions,
must be at leastr21 & single without
dependents. Must qualify on aptitude,
spelling & typing tests & shorthand.
Secretary must have 6 yrs. of office
exper. & Clerk-Steno must have 3 yrs.
(may substitute college work for exper.
except for 1 yr. of actual office exper.).
Will spend some time in Wash., D.C. &
then be assigned Overseas.
Mich. Children's Institute, Ann Arbor
-Child Care Worker for institutional
care of children, ages 6 to 12. Involves
substitute parent role, supervision of
recreational activities, etc. Man with
BA or at least 2 yrs. college with courses
in Social Sciences-Soc., Psch., Child
Dev., etc. No exper, required.
Huronpaley Girl Scouts, Ypsilanti,
Mich.-Openings for "two professional
workers. One needed immed. for west-
ern Wayne County and one inDec. for
Ann Arbor area. BA minimum. Prefer
someone not just out of college. Will
work with adults for girl troops. Teach-
ing exper. helpful. Will require 2 nights
a week. Travel involved.
t * *f
For further information, please call
General Div., Bureau of Appointments,
3200 SAB, Ext. 3544.
Part-Time
Employment
The following part-time jobs are
available. Applications for these jobs
can be made in the Part-time Placement
Office, 2200 Student Activities Bldg.,
Sduring the following hours: Mon. thrt
Fri. 8 a.m. ii2 noon and 1:30 il 5
p.m.
Employers desirous of hiring students
for part-time or full-time temporary
work, should contact Bob Hodges, Part-
time Interviewer at NO 3-1511, ext. 3553,
Students desiring miscellaneous odd
jobs should consult the bulletin board
in Room 2200, daily.
MALE
-Several Odd jobs posted on the bul-
letin board in this office.
1-To teach gymnastics on a part-time
permanent basis. Hours would be

flexible..

FOR SALE
FOR SALE: Used Reynold's flute, re-
cond. NO 2-5012 after 6:00. B32
TYPEWRITER for sale, not been used,
easy terms. Call NO 3-7990, Mrs. Gould.
B37
HALLOWEEN PUMPKINS and Decora-
tions. One mile from Stadium. 2617
Saline Rd. B27
FOR SALE: Women's quality used
clothing (plaid English woolen skirts)
size 10-12. Call 663-2823 mealtimes. B6
CHRISTIAN ENTERPRISES
STORE
3650 CARPENTER ROAD
PHONE-NO 8-9629
Tue., Wed., Thur.-$ a.m.-8 p.m.
Open: Mon., Fri., Sat.-8 a.m.-9 p.m.
Furnishings for home or apartment.
Re-upholstered and refinished furni-
ture.

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

HAPPY BIRTHDAY, DEE DEE!

LINES
3
4

ONE-DAY
.70
.85
1. 0

SPECIAL
SIX DAY
RATEp
4.20
4. 9

Figure 5 overage words to a line
Call Clossified between 1:00 and 3:00 Mon. thru Fri.
Phone NO 2-4786

Hide-A-Beds
Sofa Beds '
Platform Rockers
Occasional Chairs

$64.50
$37.50
$22.50
3.50

ELECTRICAL APPLIANCES

Refrigerators
Electric ranges
Gas ranges
Washing machines
Television sets
Radios
Desks
Dining Room sets
Bedroom suites

$29.50
$27.50
15.00
17.50
27.50
4.50
4.50
24.50
42.50

up
up
up
up
up
up
up.
up
up
up
up
up
up

PERSONAL

Miscellaneous articles of all kinds.
Clothing for the entire family.
One set of Corpus Juris Law books.
C34
USED CARS
'55 2-DR. CHEV. Good clean car, stand-
ard trans. $325. HU 2-9425.
'58 4-door Ford. Excellent condition.
311 Awixa, NO 3-0211. N24
1958 OPEL station wagon. 30,000 miles-
$550. NO 5-7165. N34
1960 OPEL Sedan, good condition, rea-
sonable price. Call NO 2-5740 after 5.
N33
1960 RENAULT convertible Caravelle.
Assume payments. Phone HU 3-1521.
N31
1957 FORD Fairlane 500. 2 dr. Hrdtp.
Power. Really clean body. Call Jim,
NO 5-9893. N30
'58 TRIUMPH. Excellent condition, new
Pirelli tires, engine overhauled. $1,095.
NO 3-5446. N1?
TRANSPORTATION
WANTBD: Interested person with
SPORTS or FOREIGN car to go to
Ft. Wayne, Ind. on Oct. 20 for a
sports car Rally. NO EXPERIENCE
NECESSARY! 412 Winchell, West. Q.
NO 2-4401, Jim Walker. G19
Drive Yourself
AND SAVE
pickups, panels, stakes,
MOVING 'VANS
Whit's Rent-A-Truck
EU 2-4434
59 Ecorse.Road
Ypsilanti, Michigan
THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
PROFESSIONAL TH EATRE
PROGRAM
;Proudly Presents

HELP WANTED
PORTER to do light house work for
lunches and dinsers about 12 hours a
week. Call Paul, 663-8517. H31
LOST: Alpha Zi Delta gold and pearl
quill pin. If found please, please call
Gray Barnett at NO 3-0522 anytime.
H132
EXPERIENCED Bookkeeper-Accountant,
female preferred, full-time. Small
business firm. By appointment. 663-
5723. H24
AVIATION SECRETARY
For Sat. & Sun. employment. Should
have experience and enjoy meeting
the public. Interviews 5-6 p.m. Thurs.
& Fri. and 9-10 a.m. on Sad. Twining
Aviation, Inc., Municipal Airport,
4320 S. State Rd. H30
FOR RENT
ROOM for female student. NO 5-0393
after 5. C24
NEW FURNISHED studio apt, at Huron
Towers-will sublet until August. One
month's rent will be paid. Call 66-
5-0578 after 5:00 p.m. C9
NEW ONE Bedroom Apartment at May-
nard House. Will sublet at loss until
Jnue. For 2 or 3 graduate students.
NO 2-1784. CS
ON CAMPUS-Well furn. apt. for 2 men.
$100. 3 men, $115. Call 5-4767 bet.
1 and 5 p.m. 3-4660 mornings and
evenings, 6-9 p.m. C47
Apartments for Rent
CARL D. MALCOLM, Jr., REALTOR
Phone NO 3-0511, evenings:
NO 5-9271 and NO 5-6634
C6
STUDENTS
Several apartments available in cam-
pus and Burns Park area.
APARTMENTS, LIMITED
NO 3-0511 Eveninugs
NO 5-9271 and 5-6634
C45
APARTMENTS FOR RENT - A limited
number of efficiency one bedroom and
2 bedroom furnished apartments
available for Oct., Nov. and Dec.
assignments to marriedstudents or
married faculty. Apply at University
Apartments Office, 2364 Bishop St.,
North Campus, or phone 662-3169 or
663-1511, Ext. 3569. C4
FOR RENT-One 3 bedroom unfurnish-
ed house with wall to wall carpeting
in living room, bedroom, and hail.
Available to faculty after Oct. 31.
Conveniently located near North
Campus. Apply at University Apart-
ments Office, 2364 Bishop St., North
Campus, or phone 662-3169 or 663-
1511, Ext. 3569. C3
ACT NOW
Studios from $111.00
1-bedroom from $130.00
Bus transportation to campus
and Ann Arbor business district.
HURON TOWERS
NO 3-0800, NO 5-9162
STUDENTS
Do you want to live In a new,
luxury two - bedroom, furnished
apartment - But do not have
enough roommates to carry the
load-don't hesitate-call Apart-
ments Ltd, NO 3-0511. Evenings
NO 5-9271, NO 5-6634. We will ar-
range meetings for interested
parties. Hurry-only four available.
C27
ROOM AND BOARD
BOARDERS WANTED. Reasonable Rates,
Good Food. Triangle Fraternity, NO
2-9431 after 6 p.m. E6

BUSINESS SERVICES
ANY MOTH HOLES, tears, or burns
in your clothes. We'll reweave them
likenew. WEAVE-BAC SHOP, 224 Ar-
cade. J2
FOR THE FINEST SELECTION of party
favors and unique gifts contact Bud-
Mor Agency, 1103 S. University, N0
2-6362. J4
MANUSCRIPTS, TERM PAPERS typed,
Multilith Offset for reproduction,
Photo copy, mailings. Gretzinger's
Business Service, 320 S. Huron. HU
2-0191. J8
AFTER THE PLAY
Don't Go To AnotherLTAVERN-
TRY YE OLD RUSTIC GROCERY.
Your Innekeeper at
RALPH'S MARKET
700 Packard
Open at 8 Sunday morning. J9
The BUD-MOR AGENCY featuring the
finest music:
Maximillan
Doug Brown
Johnny Harberd
Andy Anderson
Clarence. Byrd
Dick Tilkin
Bell Tones (Ron Bell)
Art Bartner
Men of Note
Bill Curtin
The Classics
Don't delay-
plan your parties right away
1103 S. University, Phone NO 2-6362
MISCELLANEOUS
WHY STUDY? Your friends await you
at the Schwaben Inn, 215 Ashley.
Join them for a gigantic SCEWABEN
burger (just 50c) and a cold drink.
Ya'll come. M2
WASHTENAW CAFE
GERMAN AND AMERICAN CUISINE
We specialize in
German- foods.
STUDENT SPECIALS DAILY
211 N. Main
BIKES and SCOOTERS
USED ENGLISH RACER-Good condi-
tion. Write Box 350, c/o Daily. Z23
1961 HONDA-150 cc. Good condition.
$350. NO 2-7077. Z24
CAR SERVICE, ACCESSORIES
FOREIGN CAR SERVICE
We service all makes and models
of Foreign and Sports Cars,
Lubrication $1.50
Nye Motor Sales
514 E. Washington
82'

x29

NOW WEREN'T YOU SURPRISED? F30
N.Y. AIRFLIGHT-Mass Meeting, Oct.
24, League, 7:15. F27
JOHNNY MATHIS, The Three Broads,
and Ethan send their sincerest apolo-
gies to Amy. F46
TO THE BOY with the demufflered car:
Still driving across lawns? sirho
F21
GOODBYE FRESHMAN-It has been
nice having you with us these five
weeks. Try again next year. F48
IN APOLOGY-Amy's three roommates
offer three free nights in the little
room with friend of choice. F45
GUESS WHAT? Hess getting his car
muffled (or whatever the word is).
Say, how does one master a keg?
me too F41
TO THOSE TEACHERS who are giving
tests on the 29th: My elephant has
been trained to step on you.
Freedom of Expression F40
LEARN TO SOAR-memberships open
for South Central Michigan Soaring
Society. Free instruction. Call R.1M.
Berry, Garder 8-8338. F36
WILL GIRL in Blue MGA who encount-
ered motor scooter on S. U. and Wash-
tenaw Saturday night please call 662-
9159. F35
AUSTIN DIAMOND CORP. - "Where
marginal prices buy quality dia-
monds," 1209 S. University, 663-7151.
F43
TO ALL INSTRUCTORS (particularly
of poll, sci.) who are willing to take
their chances: Please change it or I
and my elephant will be sick on the
29th. No equal time. F47
DEAR CHUCK-Sorry we were cut off.
Checked on accommodations for
Chady over Homecoming. Sorry no
room for her here. Please call if you
read this. B. B. F49

DEAR :LIBELS-
Smash 'em in tie tummy
Smash 'em in the head
Make the dratty Union fellers
Wish that they were dead.

F43

COMING SAT., November 10 -. Carlos
Montoya, Ann Arbor High. Block tick-
et orders now being taken. Contact"
the Bud-Mor Agency, 1103 8. Univer-
sity, NO 2-6362. P14
BOB NEWHART tickets, Hill Aud., Oct.
27, 8:30p.m. one sale 11 a.m.-4 p.m.
Monday through Friday at Hill Aud.
Box Office, 54c, $2.00, $2.50, Tickets
going fast. F19
PIZZA KING
1308 South University
Free, fast delivery, 3 sizes-
12-, 14-, & 16-inch. NO 5-9655
F11
DEAR LIBELS
As observed from his Wednesday night
activities, Finke's weakness is above
%his neck. The same goes for all Union
duns. Let us destroy that hideout
training ground for capitalists. F42
DEAR DUMP, RACCOON, FLASH, FINK,
WAHOO, R.C., MUSCULAR, BOMB,
CAZZIE, HATCHET, DIKE, SPIKE, IA-
GO, TRAIN, CHOICE-
FIGHT 'EM LIKE HELL FOR MICHI-
GAN AND MICH. DAILY! F44
BARB
Did I ever get took to the cleaners
and I enjoyed it too. My roommate.
took me to Frank's Kleen King, 1226
Packard, and showed me how easy it
was to dry clean all my skirts, sweat-
ers, coats, etc. A full 10 lb. load in
just 20 minutes for $2. For further
information or if you have transpor-
tation problems call NO 8-9468.
Sue F44
SPRING WEEKEND
CENTRAL COMMITTEE
PETITIONING
NOW!
F20
BARGAIN CORNER
ATTENTION ROTO
Officers' Shoes
Army-Navy Oxfords-$7.95
Socks 39c Shorts 690
Brasso 69c
SAM'S STORE
122 E. Washington
MUSICA L MDSE,
A-1 NEW AND USED INSTRUMENTS
BANJOS, GUITARS AND BONGOS
Rental Purchase Plan
PAUL'S MUSICAL REPAIR
119 W. Washington

C-TED
STAN DAR D
SERVICE
FRIENDLY SERVICE
IS OUR BUSINESS

HILL AUD. -- NOV. 8
MAIL ORDERS FILLED NOW
Send to: Professional Theatre
Program, Mendelssohn Theatre
Orch. $4.50, 4.00, 3.50
1st Bale. $3.50, 3.00, 2.50
2nd Salc. $2.50, 2.00,1.50

It's time for FALL CHANGE OVER.
Let us put ANTI-FREEZE in now be-
fore winter sets in.

-Several sales positions.
2--Electrical Engineers. Must be at
Least a Jr. or Sr. with a 3.00, or
above, grade point. Must have Se-
curity Clearance. 20 hours per week.
1-Auto-Mechanic. Will be doing ma-
jor repairs mainly wita trucks, in-
cluding welding. Must have training.
Full-time or 20 hrs. per week.
1-Short-order-cook. Must have exper-
ience. The hours would be flexible.
Transportation necessary.
FEMALE
1-Hat check girl. Hours: 12 noon to 6
p.m. Would need transportation.
(Outside Ann Arbor.)
1-To baby sit with one child, 14
months old, Would have full care
of the house. (very small). Hours: 8
a.m. to 12:30 p.m., Mon. thru Fri.
1-To baby sit and do ironing. Hours:
9:15 a.m.-1 p.m. on Wednesdays.

1f

SEMINAR
POLITICAL ASPECTS
of
THE PEACE RACE
SANFORD GOTTLIEB
Political Action Director
SANE NUCLEAR POLICY, INC.

"You expect more from
Standard and you get it."
SOUTH UNIVERSITY & FOREST
NO 8-9168
52

sT
' ' f
f
o

U

Have. your

Abrams explains that, though
folk music has become a commer-
cial fad nowadays, there are still
enough people interested in it for
its ovn sake to give folk music
artistic validity. Some artists treat
folk music as an art form and
put their "guts, soul and ability"
into it while others lack taste and
c;onsequently produce bad though
popular music.
"People find it hard to under-
stand folk music, because their
musical taste is a product .of their

Read and Use
Daily Classif ieds

i

.

Prescriptions
on file at
The
VILLAGE APOTHECARY
OPEN 9 A.M. 'til 11 P.M.
CLOSED SUNDAYS
1112 S. University Ave. - Phone NO 3-5533

'K
'K

, r . r

INTERESTED IN THE PEACE CO1R

*
'ision,
M 1

Dr. E. Lowell Kelley, chief, selection div

4:00 P.M. Monday, Oct. 22

Ui

!1

Cl

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