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October 20, 1962 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-10-20

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'SHE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE TAREE

THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE THREE

Non-Nuclear Powers Call

BUSINESS COUNCIL:
Recession Forecast Jolts Industrialists

For

Testing

Ban

G

Pled es U.S.
To Continue
In Bias Fight
UNITED NATIONS (J)-The
United States yesterday pledged.
continuing forceful efforts to end-
racial discrimination and segrega-
tion both at home and abroad.
United States Ambassador Fran-
cis T. P. Plimpton did not mention
the turmoil in Mississippi specifi-
cally in an address to the 109-
nation special political committee
debating South Africa's policies of
racial discrimination.
"I acknowledge with sorrow the
persistence of this problem in the
United States, but I speak with
pride of -my government's firm
and forceful efforts to bring racial
discrimination and segregation to
an end in the pockets where it
lingers," he said.
Praise 'Intervention'
Later in the debate, Francois
Ngyese of the Congo delegation
praised "the energetic interven-
tion" of President John F. Ken-
nedy in the Mississippi crisis.
He hailed the 'courage" of the
president in calling out troops to
insure that the rights of a minor-
ity were respected, even though
only one individual was involved.
Abdul Kakim Tabibi of Afghan-
istan also paid tribute to "the.
courageous stand of the United
States in Mississippi a few days
ago."
Apartheid-Opposition
Turning to South Africa's policy
of Apartheid Plimpton added "we
are unalterably and irrevocably
opposed to apartheid in all its as-
pects."
The United States, Plimpton.
said, has made and will continue
to make private appeals to .the
government of South Africa in an
effort to bring an end to apar-
theid.
In addition, the United States has
forbidden the sale of arms to the
South African government which
could be used to enforce Apar-
theid, Plimpton said.
Direct Action
He rejected proposals that tne
United Nations approve resolutions
calling either for economic boy-
cotts against South Africa or for
its expulsion from the United
Nations.
Several African nations have
demanded one measure or the'
other on grounds that South Af-
rica's continued defiance of the
UN Charter requires practical
sanctions.
But Plimpton said it is doubt-
ful whether all nations would
honor any economic boycott. And
he added that expulsion would
remove South Africa "from the one
place where the full weight of
public opinion can be brought to
bear on it."

TRADE CONFAB-Canadian Prime Minister John G. Diefen-
baker (left) has received a proposal for an internation trade
conference from President John F. Kennedy in an exchange of
letter. Diefenbaker had congratulated Kennedy on the passage of
the Trade Expansion Act.
Kennedy Urges Talks
On Worl d Tde .Growh
WASHINGTON (JP)-President John F. Kennedy, bolstered by
his new Trade Expansion Act, proposed yesterday an international
conference of ministers next year to seek ways to cut down obstacles
to world trade.
He suggested February or March as a possible date. No site was
named.
Those taking part would be representatives of countries which
have signed the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT).

U.S., Britain
Set Counter'
Proposition
Assembly Committee
Views Geneva Results
UNITED NATIONS ()-Thirty
non-nuclear countries yesterday
called for an end to all nuclear
testing by Jan. 1.
The United States and Britain
quickly countered with a proposal
nor a limited ban.
The proposals were submitted in
the form of resources for consider-
ation in the United Nations Gen-
eral Assembly's main Political
Committee, now debating the nu-
clear test issue.
The 30-nation resolution would
have the 109-nation assembly con-
demn all nuclear weapon tests;
ask that they cease "immediately
and not later than" Jan. 1, and
call on the nuclear powers in the
Geneva disarmament talks to ne-
gotiate an agreement for their
permanent cessation.
Interim Treaty
The American-British resolution
asked the assembly to call for an
interim treaty banning such tests
in the atmosphere, the ocean and
outer space, where they "can be
detected and identified without
international controls."
American and British sources
said their delegations would vote
against the demand for a cutoff
date in the 30-nation resolution
The proposal concentrated on
a memorandum the eight countries
produced in the Geneva negotia-
tions last April 16.
Assembly Moves
In tentative form, the resolu-
tion would have the assembly:
1 Urge the atomic powers to
stop all nuclear weapons tests im-
mediately and in any case by
;Jan. 1;
2) Endorse the eight-nation
memorandum as a basis for ne-
gotiation and ask the atomic
powers to negotiate in a spirit of
understanding;
3) Call on the atomic powers
and the disarmament committee to
give priority to reaching an agree-
ment on the cessation of nuclear
weapon tests; and
4) Ask the disarmament com-
mittee to report back to the as-
sembly by Dec. 10.

HOT SPRINGS, Va. (.P)-A fore-
cast of a minor and short-lived
business recession starting in earlyr
1963 jolted top industrialists att
the fall meeting of the Businessc
Council yesterday.
Board chairman of American
Telephone & Telegraph Co., F. R.-
Kappel, advised his fellow corpora-
tion chiefs that a "great majority"£
of the council's panel of 20 profes-c
sional economists expects the busi-
ness expansion to top out at a
record $560-billion production rate
this quarter "and turn down in the1
first quarter of 1963."
Tax-Reform Laws
Presenting the report of the
council's committee on the domes-
tic economy, which he heads,j
Kappel urged a 1963 tax-reform1
law which would spur employment-
and encourage investment.
The indicated dip, it appeared,
would be mild and brief-hardly
more than a pause in the gradual
rise of business activity. Some of
the industry economists participat-
ing, it was known, foresaw small
but steady increases at least until
mid-1963 instead of a downturn.
Little Drop
The council's consultants, for
the most part, expect total nation-
al output to drop. less than $2
billion-roughly one-fourth of 1
per cent-and to start rising again
in the second half of 1963, Kappel
said.
Although the report was present-
ed to the 100 industry leadersbe-
hind closed doors, as is the coun-
cil's practice, Kappel provided
newsmen with notes on the find-
ing of his 13-member committee.

"It is hoped," the memorandum
said, "that steps will be taken to
reduce the oppressive burden of
taxation on risk-taking, profit-
oriented investment, as a basic
step toward restoring the lost vigor
of our economy.
"Along with profit improvement,
restraint in government spending
in areas not essential to defense
and foreign policy would be a wel-
come boost to the economy.
"The cost of government has be-'
come one of the biggest costs of
doing business. If it keeps onsris-
ing, the cost of doing kbusiness is
bound to keep rising also."
Business Expansion
Although most government co-
nomists expect continued gradual
gains in business activity well into
1963, President John F. Kennedy
has announced that net tax reduc-
tion, along with basic reform of

the tax structure, will be among
his recommendations to the new
Congress. He has proposed that
these take effect as of Jan. 1, to
speed up the business expansion.
Treasury Revises
Depreciation Rule
$y The Associated Press
WASHINGTON -- The greatest
benefits of a broad revision in the
depreciation schedule issued last
July will go to the manufacturers
of automobiles, machine tools and
electrical equipment, to the aero-
space and railroad industries and
to operators of hotels, motels, res-
taurants and bottling plants, the
treasury department announced
yesterday. The revisions are sim-
plifications of schedules.

U U

ROMN EY

or SWAINSON?

YOU CHOOSE
VOTE in the
CAMPUS MOCK ELECTION

Kappel implied that the slow-
ness of business spending on new
plant and equipment could be
blamed not only on lagging profits
after taxes, but on some loss of
confidence caused by the steel-
price episode of last April. Then
Kennedy mobilized government
pressure to force United States
Steel Corp. and other producers
to rescind a $6-a-ton price boost.
Blough Presides
The chairman of United States
Steel, Roger M. Blough, presided
at yesterday's session as chairman
of the council.
Kappel and .his committee said
in this connection that "It seemed
to many that government inter-
ference in the pricing process,
coupled with government acquies-
ence in continuous wage increases,
had adverse implications for pro-
fit prospects, business confidence,
and business investment."

TUESDAY, OCT.

23

POLLS-IN THE FISHBOWL, UNION, & ENGINE ARCH-OPEN 8:30-5:00
Co-Sponsored by the Young Democratic & Young Republican Clubs
ALL FULL-TIME STUDENTS ELIGIBLE TO VOTE
BRING YOUR ID CARD!

Russians Seek
UN Admission
Of Red China
UNITED NATIONS (J)-The So-
viet Union set the stage yesterday
for another assembly debate on
China's representation In the
United Nations.
The United States expressed
confidence the outcome would be
the same as last year-no opening
of the door to Red China.
In advance of a Monday assem-
bly meeting the Soviet Union sub-
mitted a resolution demanding
ousting of the Chinese Nationalists
and inviting the Chinese Com-
munists to take their place,
The Soviet resolution calls for
the removal of the Chinese Na-
tionalists "from all United Na-
tions organs" and an invitation to
the Chinese Communists to occupy
China's place in all United Nations
bodies.
To date 40 United Nations mem-
ber nations have extended diplo-
matic recognition to the Commun-
ist regime in Peking, while 56
maintain diplomatic relations with
the Nationalist regime in Taipei.

>The conference actually would be
a special meeting of GATT.
Kennedy's proposal was made in
an exchange of letters with Prime
Minister John G. Diefenbaker of
Canada. Diefenbaker had con-
gratulated-the president on the
enactment of the new law and
suggested a ministerial meeting.
Diefenbaker, disclosing Ken-
nedy's reply in Ottawa yesterday,
said he is instructing Canada's
delegation to next week's GATT
meeting in. Geneva to seek a
special meeting next year.
The Trade Expansion Act gives
the president new power to cut
tariffs.
"I would like to take full ad-
vantage of the authority which the
Trade Expansion Act confers upon
me," Kennedy said, "and I am
eager to explore with other like-
minded nations as soon as possible
the problems and prospects for a
new approach to the reduction of
obstacles to world trade."

r AEol

ro

(r! NJi RCH

. NEWMAN CENTER
331 THOMPSON
Sat., Oct. 20 . . . 8 P.M.
21MOVIE:
GOLDEN AGE OF COMEDY

World News
Roundup
By The Associated Press
BERLIN-Wladyslaw Gomulka,
the Polish Communist leader, pre-
dicted yesterday the Communist
countries will sign a peace treaty
with East Germany in the "very
near future" during a visit to the
Berlin wall.j
* *
ON TOUR WITH PRESIDENT
KENNEDY - President John F.
Kennedy barnstormed into the
midwest yesterday on another leg
of his campaign designed to elect
more Democrats to Congress.
Again, he hit at Republican oppo-
sition to his farm and other legis-
lative programs.
PANAMA CITHY-Panamanian
President Roberto F. Chianibarred
ships registered in his country
from trading with Cuba yester-
day.
*
NEW YORK-Stock prices took
a battering yesterday in the heav-
iest trading in nearly four weeks.
Industrials were down 7.86, rails
down 0.73, utilities down. 1.68 and
65 stocks down 2.48.

"""" -""

STILL GOING!
LEAGUE PETITIONING AND INTERVIEWING
UNIVERSITY SERVICES COMMITTEE
FALL FILL-INS:
EDUCATIONAL AND CULTURAL COMMITTEE
SOCIAL COMMITTEE
INTERNATIONAL COMMITTEE
SENIOR NIGHT CENTRAL COMMITTEE
PICK UP PETITIONS IN THE LEAGUE UNDERGRADUATE OFFICE
AND SIGN UP FOR AN INTERYIEW.
INTERVIEWING ENDS OCTOBER 24

BAHA'U' LLAH
(The Glory of God)
FOUNDER
WORLD
THE PROMISED WORLD
REDEEMER
WORDS OF BAH'U'LLAH
The world's equilibrium hath been
upset through the vibrating influ-
ence of this most great, new
WORLD ORDER, Mankind's order-
ed life hath been revolutionized
through the agency of this unique,
this wondrous System-the like of
whjch mortal eyes have been
witnessed.
Soon will the present day order be
rolled up and a new one spread
out in its stead.
That which the Lord path or-
dained as the Sovereign remedy
and mightiest instrument for the
healing of all the world is the
union of all its people in one uni-
versal ca-use, one common Faith.
This can in no wise be achieved
except through the power of a
skilled, anall-powerful and in-
spired Physician."
We have fixed a time for you, O
people! If ye fail, at the appointed
hour, to turn towards God, He,
verily, will lay violent hold on you,
and will cause grievous afflictions
to assail you from every direction."
"0 ye peoples of the world! know
verily that an unforseen calamity
is following you and that grievous
retribution awaiteth you. Think not
the deeds ye have committed have
been blotted from any sight .
all your doings bath characters
upon tablets of Chrysolite."
For information and free litera-
ture write Baha'i Spiritual As-
sembly, 418 Lawrence St., or
phone 663-2904 or 668-9085.

ST. ANDREWS CHURCH and the
EPISCOPAL STUDENT
FOUNDATION-
306 North Division
Phone NO 2-4097
SUNDAY-
8:00 A.M. Holy Communion.
9:00 A.M. Holy Communion and Sermon
for Students.
11:00 A.M. Morning Prayer and Sermon.
7:00 P.M. Evening Prayer and commentary-
TUESDAY-
9:15 A.M. Holy Communion.
WEDNESDAY-
7:00 A.M. Holy Communion.
FRIDAY-
12:10 P.M. Holy Communion.
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL
REFORMED
United Church of Christ
423 South Fourth Ave. /
Rev. Ernest Klaudt, Pastor
Rev. A. C. Bizer, Associate Pastor
9:30 and 10:45 '.m. Worship Service
9:30 and 10:45 a.m. Church School
7:00 p.m. Student Guild
MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tappan Streets
Rev. Russell M. Fuller, Minister
9:30 Guild House at 802 Monroe
9:30 Study Seminar at Guild House
10:45 Worship
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
Washtenaw at Berkshire
Rev. Erwin Gaede
The sermon topic for Sunday, Oct. 21, will be:
"Intelligence in the Modern World."
Church School and Worship Services at 9:30
and 11:00 a.m.
Student Group: 7:30 p.m.
FIRESIDE FORUM
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
for single young adults
Meetings in First Methodist Church
in Youth Raoom
Sunday-7:30 p.m.
ANN ARBOR FRIENDS MEETING
(QUAKERS)
1420 Hill Street
NO 2-9890
Herbert Nichols, Clerk
Ray and Nancy McNair, House Directors
SUNDAY
10:00 a.m. Adult Discussion, Sunday School.
11:00 a.m.Meeting for Worship.
TUESDAY
5:30-7:00 p.m. Supper: Spiritual Experience
and Social Action.

r r!

ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
William and Thompson Streets
Mgsr. John F. Bradley, Chaplain
Rev. Alexander Brunett
RELIGIOUS SCHEDULE 4
Sunday Masses: 8:00, 9:30, 11:00 A.M.,
12:00 Noon and 1'2:30.
Holyday Mosses: 6:30, 7:00, 8:00, 9:00 A.M.,
12:00 Noon, 5:10 P.M.
Weekday Masses 7:00, 8:00, 9:00 A.M. and
12:00 Noon.
Novena Devotions: Mother of Perpetual Help.
Wednesday evening, 7:30 P.M.
Rosary and Litany: Daily at 5:10 P.M.
EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM
Weekly classes in Philosophy Tuesday at 8:00.
Fundamentals of the Catholic Faith Tuesday
and Thursday at 10 a.m., 2, 3, 8 p.m.
Foundations of Christianity Tuesday and
Thursday at 1, 3, 7 p.m. Sacred Scripture
Monday at 7:00, Thursday at 8:0. Medi-
cal Ethics Thursday at 7:00. Nursing
Ethics Monday at 8:00. Newman Classes
Friday at 8:00. Open Forum Wednesday
at 8:00.
LUTHERAN STUDENT CENTER
AND CHAPEL
National Lutheran Council
Hill St. at S. Forest Ave.
Henry 0. Yoder, Pastor
Anna M. Lee, Associate
SUNDAY
9:30 a.m. Worship Service.,
10:00 a.m. Bible Study.
11:00 a.m. Worship Service and Communion.
7:00 p.m. "Love, Sex a n d Marriage" -
Student Panel.
WEDNESDAY
7:15-7:45 p.m. Midweek Devotions.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Avenue
NO 2-44b6
Ministers: Ernest T. Campbell, Malcolm
Brown, Virgil Janssen
SUNDAY-
Worship at 9:00, 10:30 and 11:50.
Presbyterian Campus Center located at the
Church.
Staff: Jack Borckardt and Patricia Pickett
Stoneburner.
NO 2-3580
THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
W. Stadium at Edgewood
John G. Malcin, Minister
SUNDAY
10:00 a.m. Bible School
11:00 a.m. Regular Worship
6:30 p.m. Evening Worship
WEDNESDAY
7:30 p.m. Bible Study

FIRST
and

State and Huron Streets, Tel. NO 8-6881
Dr. Hoover Rupert, Minister
Rev. M. Jean Robe and
Rev. C. J. Stoneburner, Campus Ministers
SUNDAY
9:00 and 11:15 a.m. - Morning Worship.
"Beyond Privilege to Responsibility," ser-
mon by Dr. Rupert.
10:15 a.m.-Seminor, Pine Room. Series sub-
ject, "Encounters with Other Living Re-
ligions." Topic: The Religions of India.
Speaker, Dr. P. Spreenivasachar.
7:00 p.m.-WORSHIP AND PROG'kAM. First
Loud Lecture. Dr. Glen Martin, "New
Life in the Spirit."
MONDAY
8:00-11:00 p.m. OPEN HOUSE, Jean Robe's
apartment.
TUESDAY
12:00 Noon-STUDENT CABINET Tuncheon,
Pine Room.
7:30 p.m.-Course on Old Testament by
Tony Stoneburner.
7:30 p.m.-Course on Contemporary Theo-
logians by M. Jean Robe.
WEDNESDAY
7:00 a.m.-HOLY COMMUNION, Chapel.
Followed by breakfast in the Pine Room.
Out for 8 o'clocks.
4:00 p.m.-COFFEE HOUR, Lounge.
5:10 p.m. HOLY COMMUNION, Chapel.
6:00-8:00 p.m.-Grad Supper, 'Pine Room.
FRIDAY
6:00-8:00 p.m.-Young Married, dinner in
the Pine Room.
Wesley Foundation Retreat date Oct. 19-21:
CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William
Services at 9:30 and 11:00 a.m. "Accepting
Life's Decisions," Dr. Fred E. Luchs.
Bible Lecture, 10:20-10:40, Mrs. Luchs.
CHURCH SCHOOL: Crib through 9th grade,
9:30 and 11:00a.m.
Student Guild, 802 Monroe, 7:30 p.m. Sunday.
Telephone 2-51.89 for weekly activities.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH AND
BAPTIST CAMPUS CENTER
512.and 502 E. Huron
Rev. James Middleton, Minister
Rev, Paul W. Light, Minister of Education
(Minister to students)
SUNDAY
9:45 a.m.Campus class on Christian ethics.
11:00 a.m. Morning Worship.
SUNDAY EVENING
6:45-8:00 p.m. American Baptist Student
Fellowship (introduction to theological
task), worship and discussion of "The
National and World Student Christian
Federation."
Monday Noon-Lunch and Discussion.

METHODIST CHURCH
WESLEY FOUNDATION

For transportation to any service

call 2-2756

FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST

UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND.STUDENT CENTER
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)

CAMPUS CHAPEL
Washtenaw at Forest
Sponsored by the Christian Reformed
Churches of Michigan
10:00 A.M. Worship Services

i

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