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October 19, 1962 - Image 7

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-10-19

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

P'At E 1'

THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE SEVEN

By JIM BERGER Timberlake is the best perce
Sophomore Bob Timberlake will age passer among the Wolve
be Michigan's starting quarterback quarterbacks and is also the
against Purdue tomorrow. ond leading ground-gainer. The
It will be the first time in more 4" 202-lb. sophomore from Fr
than two seasons that Dave Glin- lin, Ohio, has completed 5 of
ka will not be Michigan's starting passes and has ru'shed for 93
signal caller. Glinka will take over yds, in 26 carries.
Timbe'lake's old job on Michigan's Only senior halfback Dave
defensive "Raider" squad. mey has picked up more yar

Makes

First

Team'

DAILY VS. UNION:
Scene Set for Bier Bowl

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ent-
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WI KS THINKS
By Jan Winkelman
Comeback Trail
On March 31, 1962, Michigan gymnast Lew Hyman was seriously
injured when he fell from the Trampoline while competing in the
NCAA championships at Albuquerque, N.M. That day could have been
a black one for the sport of gymnastics, but miraculously tragedy was
averted. e
According to Michigan gymnastics coach Newt Loken there has 1
never been a major debilitating injury incurred in American inter-
collegiate gymnastics history. The injury to Hyman came closest to
being an unwanted first. Fortunately, Lew has recovered and an ob-
jective account of his accident can be undertaken.
Lew, a sophomore, was finishing up his Trampoline routine
in the finals that Saturday night. He was supposed to compete
later that evening in the tumbling event. He never made it.
On the final trick of his routine, a triple twisting back somersault,
he went careening up and at an angle, apparently in such a way so
as to land on the apparatus. Then, because of his great speed and
twisting motion, Lew was on the floor before anyone realized what
was happening..
Last year's captain Tom Osterland, himself a trampolinist, who
was present as a "spotter" at the time of Hyman's accident described
it this way:
"Lew leaned heavily into his twist. The leaning pushed him out
beyond the Trampoline. Lew was twisting and moving so fast that
it was hard to realize what was happening. Nobody present could pre-
dict that Lew would miss the apparatus. We all thought he would hit
the edge. One moment he was coming down and in the next he was
veering off. Before I knew what had happened, Lew had hit the floor."
Sudden Calamity ...
VER(Y CONCEIVABLE precaution had been taken to assure that
an injury would not occur. The four standard "spotters" were
standing about the Trampoline in the event anything would go wrong.
Unfortunately, the unexpectedness of the accident and its instantane-
ousness left the spotters powerless to act.
Lew was immediately' taken to ~ ]
Albuquerque Presbyterian Hospital ':
with a concussion and brain hem-
orrhage suffered when his head
struck the floor. Four hours of '.
surgery were necessary to alleviate ."
pressure caused by the hemor-
rhage. Doctors did not expect Hy- : .............::..
man to survive.
Lew remained unconscious for ..
two weeks after the operation. Al- ,'< .,::
though he was uninjured other- . ;, 'P "
wise, members of the hospital . :.,.
staff, Coach Loken, and Hyman's ''..:>.
parents who remained at his bed- " " ..
side, were fearful of permanent
brain damage. For weeks he could ..*4, '= X
not communicate or recognize his -
parents. He remained partially
paralyzed. LEW HYMAN
Then dramatically, a month . , .courageous comebac
after the injury, Lew began to im-
prove. He regained strength in his limbs, he conversed with his par-
ents, he began to talk about going back to school. On May 16, he flew
home to New York.
Hyman's miraculous recovery seems to have been a product of
his superb physical condition at the time of the accident and his own
great determination to recover from the effects of his injury.
Four weeks before the NCAA meet, Hyman had been runner-up
in tumbling at the Big Ten meet at Columbus. An important reason
for his fine showing then was Lew's "guts." He was a hard worker-
a real fighter, a diligent competitor.
He still is.
Back to School ...
HYMAN IS presently back at the University. Studying a reduced
nine-hour program, Lew looks forward to taking on a full program
in the near future. Although he has been forced to abandon his pre-
vious role as a cheerleader owing to doctor's orders, Lew is doing
calisthenics presently in the afternoons.
As to the question of whether or not he will compete this year
with the Wolverines, who are defending Big Ten champions, Lew
is undecided. Doctors have told him to curtail all contact athletics
for the next two years. Lew seems unwilling to wait. He feels fine
and wants to make a comeback.
Loken is willing to let Lew make up his own mind, but will not
allow Hyman to compete until he is absolutely sure that by competing
Lew will not endanger his health.
What does the future hold in store for Lew Hyman? He feels
healthy, and looks forward to competing again. Prognosis: excellent.

What does the future hold in store for Wolverine gymnastics?
Hyman's recovery removes the possible blemish which might have
appeared had Hyman's recovery been anything less than spectacular.
There has been no adverse publicity toward the accident. Lew may
even represent the Wolverines again this year. Newt Loken's squad
is a lear favorite for its third straight Big Ten title. My prognosis:
excellent.

173 in 48 carries). Halfback Tom
Prichard is the best percentage
hrower with one for one netting
hree yds.
Young Players
Starting Timberlake fits right
nto Michigan Coach Bump El-
iott's plans for the season. "We
have a very young team this year,"
said Elliott, "and we're trying to
use as many sophomores as we
can."
"I would definitely say that this
year is a building year, but our
main objective naturally is to win
as many games as possible," he
said.
In Michigan's three units there
are 4 sophomores. Of the 14, two
are on Michigan's starting team;
seven are on the "Raider" unit
while the other four are on Mich-
igan's offensive platoon.
"I plan to use as many sopho-
mores and inexperienced boys as
possible," Elliott continued, "be-
cause I believe that the best teach-
er is experienced and there is no
better way to prepare for the fu-
ture than to give them game ex-
perience."
Soph Potential
Along with Timberlake, ElliOtt
named several others that he con-
sidered to have "really good poten-
tial." "I think both Arnie Simkus
and Richard Hahn have each
shown a lot of improvement and
promise. Also (Bill) Laskey and
(Ben) Farabee have looked better
at end along with Jim Conley who
has also shown improvement. Jim
Green has been playing quite a
bit at center and is looking bet-
Simkus and Hahn are tackle and
guard, respectively, on the "Raid-
er" team.
Other Sophs
Other sophomores on Michigan's
three units are halfbacks Dick
Rindfuss and Tom Mihive; guards
John Marcum and Dave Butler;
tackles Richard Schram and. Pat
McAleer, and quarterback Frosty
Evashevski.
Practice Notes
The Michigan squad leaves
shortly before noon today for La-
fayette. Yesterday the Wolverines
had a light workout in sweat pants
and without pads. They viewed
movies before going out to prac-
tice. The squad will hold a light;
practice this morning before leav-
ing for Purdue.
Pick Rigney
Junior Loop
Pilot of Yr.
NEW YORK ()-Bill Rigney,
whose Los Angeles Angels astound-
ed the baseball world by finishing
third in only their second season
in the American League, was nam-
ed the league's 1962 Manager of
the Year Thursday in the annual
Associated Press poll.
Sam Mele of the second-place
Minnesota Twins was a distant
runnerup in the balloting with 25
votes. Ralph Houk of the pennant-
winning New York Yankees was
third with three.
Rigney, an astute handler of
youngsters, had his surprising club
in second place as late as Sept. 12
before the Angels dropped to third.
NHL SCORES
Montreal 4, Toronto 2
Detroit 5, New York 3

By GRANTAND RICE
and JOE APPELTt
The Michigan Daily Malcontents
ran through a final brisk prac-
tice session yesterday in prepara-
tion for this afternoon's third an-#
nual Bier Bowl game with the1
Michigan Union.'
The Union Undesirables won last
year 8-6 to gain possession of the
Big Brown Wastebasket. Head1
coach Jon "Undesirable" Carlson1
says his team lost heavily through1
graduation, but his squad is still
a 14 point favorite on the basis of
a fine sophomore team.
Key Injuries
The Malcontents have added
more depth to the squad, but are
missing a few key men through
injury. Coach Tom "Dump" Web-
ber is placing most of his hopes
on Bob "The Zephyr" Zwinck, a
talented junior tailback. Zwinck's
chief targets are fleet ends Ron
"Wahoo" Wilton and Jerry "R.C."
Storch, and wingback Stan "O1-
lie Fran" Kukla. Fred Russell "The
Muscle" Kramer, Tom "The Bomb"
Hunter, and Jerry "Kazzie" Kalish
round out the first team Cheetah
(not the animal) unit.
Webber revealed he would also
use the Red Dogs, the defensive
unit, captained by Mike "Premier"
Olinick.
Secret Sessions
The Malcontents have been
working out all week in secret ses-
sions, barred even to the press.
"We wanted to get away from
those snoopy reporters so we could
really concentrate on getting that
basket back," Webber snapped.
Carlson meanwhile has been
fighting overconfidence. "We were
really high last weekend," Carlson

conjectured, "but I hope the boys.
will be sober for the big one."
The Undesirables list four high
school jocks on the starting seven.
Carlson himself will direct the at-
tack from the tailback spot. He
threw for the Undesirables' touch-
down and extra point last year.
Also starting for the favorites are
Dave "Stretch" Hoekenga, end;'
Jim "Fashion Model" Seff, end;
Bob "Smiling Ed" McKenzie, wing-
back; Jim "Bulldog" Fadim, cen-
ter; Doug "Duffy" Peacock, half-

back; and Loyal "to the End" Eld-
ridge, halfback.
"This is a grudge match," Carl-
son snorted. "We haven't been get-
ting enough space lately."
Webber bemoaned the loss of
John (the Racoon) Scochin and
Philly (the Actor) Sutin from
the Malcontent corps. He summed
up his teams chances, however,
with a spirited quote. "Where
opinions are free, truth will pre-
vail," he bemoaned.
Kickoff time is 4:30 p.m. at Old
Ferry Field.

r1

THE HENRY MARTYN LOUD LECTURE SERIES
PRESENTS
"New Life in the Spirit"
BY

Dr. Glen Martin

,

SUNDAY, OCT. 21
WESLEY FOUNDATION
STATE AT HURON

7:00 P.M.

1:

-Daily-James Keson
FIRST STRING--Quarterback Bob Timberlake will have his first
starting assignment tomorrow against Purdue. The sophomore
sensation leads the team in passing yardage and is second in rush-
ing behind Dave Raimey. Timberlake replaces senior Dave Glinka,
a starter for the past two seasons, who takes over the quarterback-
ing duties o nthe "Raider" defensive unit.

,.
. I

Nunn-Bush

and

Michigan Sports History

Edgerton

SHOE

S

(EDITOR'S NOTE: This is the.
fourth in a series. spotlighting mlemn-
orable moments in the history of
Michigan sports. Today's article
deals with Purdue. On occasion,
past records of the contests make;
no mention of a player's first name.)
By GARY WINER
Meeting for the eighth time
since the inaugural series contest
in 1890, Michigan's Wolverines
and Purdue's Boilermakers tangled
once again at Lafayette on Oct.
13, 1929.
Purdue had managed only one
victory in this long span of time.
The series had almost been com-
pletely forgotten as the two teams
hadn't faced each other since 1900
when Michigan was victorious, 11-
8.

The first quarter saw both teams
play evenly with the score knotted
0-0 going into the second period.
The Boilermakers were the first to
draw blood when their left half-
back, "Pest" Welch, raced 30 yards
for a touchdown to give the hosts
a 6-0 halftime lead.
'M' Takes Lead
The Wolverines came out fight-
ing in the third period as Joe
Gembis started things off with a
20-yd. drop kick, and moments lat-
er, the Wolverine left end, Joe
Truskowski, blocked a Boilermaker
punt and waltzed into the end
zone to finally put his team ahead.
The visitors weren't t h r o u g h
though, as Gembis this time show-
ed his running ability by racing
17 yards to give Michigan a 16-6
third quarter lead.
Purdue Wins
It appeared as though the visi-
tors had their seventh series vic-
tory clinched with only five min-
utes remaining on the clock when

Purdue really got rolling. Yuno-
vitch tallied two more times and
Caraway also scored to put the
icing on the cake as Purdue de-
feated Michigan 30-16.
Phelan's charges kept moving
the entire year and wound up on
top of the Big Ten at the conclu-
sion of the season. Purdue has
never beaten a Michigan team
since, however.

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Kipke's First Year
Harry Kipke was in his first
year as the Wolverine's head men-
tor. He had a tough assignment in
trying to stop Coach Jimmie Phel-
an's Notre Dame-type offense
which had been originated by
Knute Rockne. The Maize and
Blue had the size advantage on
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expected to test the air lanes and
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quently in this encounter.
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