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October 14, 1962 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-10-14

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PAGE TWO,

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 14, 1962

PAGE TWO TIlE MICflIGAN DAILY SUNDAY, OCTOBER 14, 1962

PROF. STOKES:
Voters' Influence Increases

By DEBORAH BEATTIE
"Constituency influence is con-
tinuous throughout the represent-
ative's term, but it has its focal
point at the polls," Prof. Donald
E. Stokes of the department of
political science said Friday.
Speaking on "Political Percep-
tions of Candidates and Voters"
at a psychology colloquium, Prof.
Stokes outlined two ways in which
voters' attitudes are transferred
to representatives and reflected in
their roll call behaviors.
The first transfer method is a
similarity between the attitudes of
the constituency and that of the
representative. The second means
of influence transfer is the rep-
resentative's perception of the
constituency's attitude.
Necessary Conditions
Prof. Stokes cited three neces-
sary and sufficient conditions to
assure the influence of the con-
stituency on the representative's
roll call behavior: "the representa-
tive must agree with the consti-
tuents' attitudes; the representa-
tive must be able to perceive with
some degree of accuracy the atti
tude of his constituents; and the
constituency must take into con-
sideration to some extent the
policy stands of contestants when
expressing its own stand.
"The third requirement is the
*most difficult to satisfy," Stokes
pointed out. "An examination of
all congressional districts in which
there was a Republican-Demo-
cratic conflict in 1958 showed
that a fifth of the constituency
had not read about both candi-
dates and more than half had not
read about either candidate.
Random Sample
"A representative also has
great difficulty in getting a ran-
dom sampling of the voters' at-
titudes because most of the people
who contact the representatives
have an exaggerated amount of
information," he said.
"There are solutions to the
problem of fulfilling the necessary
and sufficient conditions," Prof.
Stokes said. "It is possible that
the constituency can get positive
Study Course
Evaluation
The literary college steering
committee last week discussed the
possible establishment of a course
evaluation book, designed to give
students in all colleges and schools
wishing to cooperate in the pro-
ject an idea of. the content and
quality of subjects offered during
the semester.
The booklet has been discussed
for some time by a Student Gov-
ernment Council committee con-
cerned with improving the ability
of students to select meaningful
courses, and concerned with the
fact that in many instances stu-
dents depend upon hearsay in de-
termining the values of a course.
The committee inspected a
booklet put out at the University
of Pittsburgh which offers a criti-
cism of undergraduate courses.
Various suggestions for the ten-
tative evaluatory booklet included
thy distribution of a survey to all
students to learn their opinion, or,
if this proved impractical, a sim-
ilar distribution to a random min-
ority of the various schools and
colleges.
The survey would ask for the
students' opinion of the courses
and the instructor. The collected
'survey would be tabulated and the
results printed in the survey book-
let, which would cost approxi-
mately 10 cents.
It was determined that if other
schools and colleges would not
support the idea, the literary col-
lege could produce a booklet
evaluating only its courses.

"Finally, thetrepresentative re-
gards the electors' sanctions at
the polls as potential not actual."
An alternative method of atti-
tude transfer cited by Stokes is
popular control of the representa-
tives by national political parties.
In this case it is sufficient for
the constituency to know the can-
didates' party labels, if there is a
genuine difference in opinion on
issues between the parties.
The extent or part competition
differs depending on the issue.
Party label information is guar-
anteed to everyone.
Made of Response
"Research shows that repre-
sentatives have no standard mode
of response to their constituen-
cies," Prof. Stokes said.
However, he added that "the
usual response of representatives is"
thoroughly Burkian. E d m u n d
Burke believed that representa-
tives should be independent of
their constituencies, thus free
from electoral sanction.
"When there is a conflict be-
tween attitudes of the constituency
and the representative, the repre-
sentative will conform in advance
to his perception of the consti-
tuency's view," Stokes said.

PROF. DONALD STOKES
. . . politicians' attitudes

or negative views about candidates
that were started for controversial
reasons.
"Representatives can count on
party background, so the strategic
situation is not one of pulling to-
gether an electorate out of noth-
ing.

PROGRAM, NOTES]I

The first Chamber Dance Fes-
tival will be inaugurated today,
tomorrow and Tuesday in Rack-
ham Aud. with three exotic dance
programs.E
At 2:30 p.m. today, Nora Ko-
vach and Istavan Roaovsky, with
two assisting dancers and a pian-
ist, will perform highlights from
great Russian ballet classics.
Included will be "Chopiniana"
by Chopin; "Peasant pas de deux"
from "Giselle" by Adolphe Adam;
"The Blue Danube Waltz" by
Strauss; "Pas de deux" from "The
Nutcracker" by Tchaikovsky; "The
Saffron Knot" by Wagner; Melody
from "Orfeo ed Euridice" by
Gluck; and "Esmeralda-Grand
pas de deux" by Pugni.
Also included in the program
are two piano numbers-"Prelude
and Nocturne" by Scriabin and
"Five Preludes" by Chopin, per-
formed by pianist Howard Barr.
At 8:30 p.m. Monday the Pha-
kavali dancers and musicians of
Bangkok, Thailand, will perform
classical dance - dramas, mask,
drum, and sword dances.
The Siamese dancers will be
accompanied by the Pi-Phat or-

The Jose Molina Bailes Espan-
oles, a lively company from Spain,
will appear at 8:30 p.m. in a per-
formance of boleros, tangos, fla-
mencos and the zambras of the
Andalucian moors.
Limelighters .. .
The Limelighters will present
a program of traditional folk
music combined with up-to-date
humor at 8 p.m. tonight in Hill
Aud. Together only a little more
than a year, the three singers have
appeared on tour with comedian
Mort Sahl, at San Francisco's
hungry i and New York's Blue
Angel.
Contemporary Music...
Violinist Morris Hochberg, Grad,
will give a recital of contemporary
music at 8:30 p.m. tonight in Lane
Hill Aud. Hochberg, a member of
the Detroit Symphony Orchestra,
will play works by John Weinz-
weig, Charles Mills, Leslie Bas-
sett and Charles Ives.
'The Tavern' ..
The Association of Producing
Artists will present George M.
Cohan's comedy-melodrama "The
Tavern" at 8:30 p.m. Wednesday
though Friday, at 6 p.m. and 9
p.m. Saturday, and at 3 p.m. next
Sunday in the Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre.
'La Traviata' ..
The Goldovsky Grand Opera
Theatre will present Verdi's "La
Traviata" at 8:30 p.m. Friday in
Hill Aud. under the auspices of
the University Musical Society.
Duo-Pianists . ..
Professors Millar dCates, tenor,
Charles Fisher and Eugene Bos-
sart, duo-pianists, of the music
school, will give a concert at 8:30
p.m. Saturday in Hill Aud. In-
cluded in the program will be
works by Bach, Schubert and
Verdi.
'Fantasticks' . .
The Detroit premiere of "The
Fantasticks," an off-Broadway
musical, will open at Wayne State
University at 8:30 p.m. Friday,
running Saturday at 8:30 p.m. and
the following Thursday through
Saturday. There will be a matinee
at 3:30 p.m. Sunday.

Association
To Sponsor
Campus UN
International Week, beginning1
today and ending next Saturday,
will feature many varied events.
From 4:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m.
today the International Student
Association is holding a "Sunday
Supper with Music" at the Inter-
national Center.
At 4:15 Monday, the ISA is
sponsoring a panel discussion on
"The American Image Abroad" in
the Multipurpose Rm. of the UGLI.
Various fraternities, sororities, and
dormitories will be the hosts to
foreign students at dinner Tues-
day.
German Club
At 8 p.m. Tuesday, the German
Club is showing "Hamlet," a Ger-
man film with English subtities,
in the Multipurpose Rm.
The International Fashion Show
will be held at 7:30 p.m. Wednes-
day in the Women's League's
Brandenburg Rm. The sponsor of
this event is the League Inter-
national Committee.
From 4:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m.,
Thursday, South Quad. and Couz-
ens Hall will hold an International
Autumn Tea in the South Quad.
Club 600.
Williams To Speak
On Friday and Saturday the
Campus United Nations will take
place. All events for the moch
UN will be located in the Michigan
Union Ballroom. At 7 p.m., Friday,
Assistant Secretary of State for
African Affairs, G. Mennen Wil-
liams will speak on the "Moral
and Spiritual Factors in the Strug-
gle for World Communism." .At
8:30 p.m. the delegations will
caucus.
At 10:30 a.m. Saturday, Profes-
sor John G. Stoessenger, of the
political science department at
Hunter College, will talk on "The
Alternative in UN Financing."
The Campus General Assembly
will open debate on the financing
of the UN, including relevant is-
sues, at 1:30 p.m.
Campus UN
The Union International Affairs
Committee is sponsoring all of the
Campus UN programs. Williams'
appearance is being co-sponsored
by the Ecumenical Center.
The last activity of International
week is the UN Dance Festival
and Evening of International and
Social Dancing, which will be held
at 8 p.m. Saturday in the Union
Ballroom. Admission is free. This
is being sponsored by the ISA.
Generation'
Names Staff
"Generation" has announced its
staff for the coming year.
John Herrick, '63, is the editor-
in-chief, with Steve Friedman, '64,
as poetry editor, and Lawrence
Jacobs, '63A&D, and Pat Marte-
lino, '64A&D, as art editors.
Wilfred Roy, '64, will act as
business manager.
Heading the essays and drama
sections are Howard Abrams, '62,
and Ronald Kenyon, '63. Michael
De Gaetano, '64, is the music edi-
tor.
More staff members are Judy
Dukler, '64, Sylvia Berliner, '63,
Carol Ardman, '63, Michael Rob-
bins, '64, and Dave Colson, '63.
Serving as the "inter-arts mag-
azine" of University students,
"Generation" presents musical
scores, photography and other vis-
ual arts in addition to student
essays, fiction and poetry.
The magazine was founded in
1949, in the midst of the veteran's
post-war college renaissance. Stu-
dents of the time felt a new con-

cept in literary magizines was
needed to expand its scope beyond
the printed word. "Generation"
was the result.

(EDITOR'S NOTE: This is the sev-
enth in a series of 21 articles fea-
turing the namesakes of the men's
residence halls. This and the follow-
ing seven articles will cover East
Quadrangle.)
By LOUISE LIND
Dean Henry Clay Anderson was
probably one of the most active
ment to ever head the engineering
college.
The 1897 Kentucky State Col-
lege graduate in mechanical en-
gineering teamed with the Uni-
versity in 1899, commencing upon
a 40 year-adventure into the aca-
demic and professional worlds.
Fondly called "Marse Henry,"
and "Andy," Dean Anderson was
popular with alumni and students
alike, frequently serving as ad-
visor-administrator to student and
alumni organizations.
Board Member
He was for many years one of
the most energetic members of
the Michigan Union Board of Di-
rectors. His efforts there, on the
Board in Control of Physical Edu-
cation and on the Residence Halls
Board of Governors won him the
honorary designation "sachem"
of Michigauma in 1932. The tribe
called him "Wise Councils."
Despite his academic and ad-
ministrative duties, Dean Anderson
endeavored to remain close to the
student body. He is said to have
commented, "my office doors are
always open to students; office
hours are from the time I arrive
in the morning until I leave at
night; that's the kind of thing
that makes life worth living."
The University student branch
of the American Society of Me-
chanical Engineers expressed its
fondness for Dean Anderson when
it presented him with a "spofun-
cup," a mock trophy for "the man
who can take it." By tradition, the
cup went to the most popular
professor.
Professionally, Dean Anderson
was a recognized authority on
public utilities and heating and

ventilation problems. His specialty
was valuation and appraisal, es-
pecially of steam and electric rail-
ways. He was the consulting en-
gineer for the Packard Motor Co.
in Detroit and designed the plans
of the power plants, heating, and
lighting for the State Prison in
Jackson and the J. L. Hudson Co.
in Detroit.
Becomes Dean
Death came in 1939, just two
years after he had succeeded Dean
Herbert C. Sadler to the head of
the engineering college. Old
"Marse Henry" died at his radio
set while listening to the football
game at the stadium.
In 1941, to honor Dean Ander-
son's work on the Union Board, a
large room where University grid-
ders used to gather for training
table meals on the first floor of
the Union was named the Ander-
son Room.
The room, previously designated
only by the number 116, had been
completely renovated and re-
decorated. It is presently used for
banquets, meetings and other func-
tions.

11

L

f

Dean Anderson is
honored by Anderson
East Quadrangle.

Henry Clay Anderson

l.

especially
House in

S.G.C.'7
TONIGHT at 7:00 and 9:00
RELUCTANT
DEBUTANTE
COLOR
Rex Harrison, Kay Kendall, John Saxon,
Sandra Dee, Angela Lansbury
SHORT: Sidney Peterson's The Cage
Next Week- Bombshell
ARCHITECTURE AUDITORIUM
50 cents

City To Seal
Cornerstone
Richard D. Blodgett city ad-
ministrative assistant, announced
the final list of objects to be seal-
ed in the cornerstone of the new
City Hall at 2 p.m. today.
Mayor Cecil O. Creal will of-
ficiate at the cornerstone cere-
mony. Some of thei objects in-
cluded will be: a copy of the city
capital improvement program,
Saturday's edition of the Ann
Arbor News, a city thoroughfare
map, and a central business dis-
trict map. The public is invited to
attend.

1I

B'NAI B'RITH HILLEL FOUNDATION
First Session Tomorrow, Oct. 15, at 8 P.M.
"BELIEFS and PRACTICES OF JUDAISM"
a new class to meet weekly
1429 Hill Street

I m__ _ _ _ _ I

DIAL
2-6264

TODAY 41 2J

DIAL
8-6416

MOVED SOUTH
to the CAMPUS THEATRE for an
UNPRECEDENTED HOLDOVER
"CAN BE PROUD OF ITS 'OSCAR'!"
-Rose Pelswick, N.Y. Journal American

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"

LIMELIGHTERS
. . . singing trio

chestra with its delicate music,
legendary for over a century.
The Phakavali company will
perform formal court dances, a
sword dance which is an actual
duel with double swords, gay folk
dances and regional dances.

A

mwmm w

11

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DIAL 5-6290

LAST TIME TODAY-MATINEE 3 P.M.

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THE UNIVERSITY of MICHIGAN
PROFESSIONAL THEATRE PROGRAM
PROUDLY PRESENTS
THE
APA
(ASSOCIATION Of PRODUCING ARTISTS)

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*I*I IOPI
w- ~.ay* ~ - II I t

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