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October 05, 1962 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-10-05

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SIR.

THE, MICHIGAN DAILY

SIX TINE MICHIGAN DAILY

: -ra+ At I vv; vuli LY X79 1 7V Fr

lays, Pagan Collect Three Hits

STOP RAIMEY; STOP 'M':
Four 'M' Passers
Fail To Do Share

OSU Dean Asks
Nicklaus Withdraw

(Continued from Page 1)
season ended Sunday. They work-
ed out Wednesday in Candlestick
to familiarize themselves with the
tricky wind currents. However, the
wind didn't arrive in full force
during the game because it was
started at noon (PDT).

and managed to keep the ball
from going over the barrier for
a homer but couldn't hold it. It
bounced away for a two-run
double.
Giants Not Dead
If the Yanks had any ideas
that the Giants would. roll over
and play dead after that first

Ford's Blouse and Pantaloons shock of their power, they had
were ruffled by the breeze as he another guess coming.
came down the stretch for a The Giants scrambled back
strong finish. It was his seventh with a run in the second on
complete Series game and his 18th Mays' first single, another single
Series appearance in all. by Jim Davenport and a beauti-
Roger Maris, the 61-homer hero fully-placed drag bunt by Pagan
of 1961 but a .256 batter this sea- that got Mays home from third.
son, gave the Giants a quick taste Ford knew he was in for
of Yankee power with a long blast trouble when the Giants lit into
to the right field fence in the him again in the third. With one
first. Bobby Richardson and Tom out, Chuck Hiller looped a double
Tresh had singled before Maris' to left center and Felipe Alou
laced the ball to the fence. Felipe singled to right, moving Hiller to
Alou jumped high into the air E third. Up came Mays and he de-

livered another single into center
that scored Hiller and tied the
score at 2-2.
O'Dell Overworked
Ford and O'Dell, the latter over-
worked in the Giants' bitter pen-
nant fight, struggled along until
the seventh wth Ford blunting
Giants threats in the fourth, fifth
and sixth.
Boyer led off the Yankee sev-
enth by riding a 2-2 pitch over
the wire fence in left about 365
feet away. It was the first World
Series homer for Boyer in 10
games.
Maris started the. Yanks off
again in the eighth when he
singled with one out. O'Dell pinked
Elston Howard with a pitch and
manager Alvin Dark came out to
converse with his tiring lefty.
After a short consultation, Dark
decided to -stay with O'Dell be-

cause the Yanks had a left-hand-
ed batter coming up next in Dale
Long, wh6 had replaced the ach-
ing Bill Skowron. Long crossed up
Dark by singling into right field,
scoring Maris.
Don Larsen, the Yanks' perfect
game pitcher of the 1956 Series,
came in to face his old metes
under Series conditions for the
first time. Boyer lifted a fly to
short left on which shortstop Pag-
an collided with Harvey Kuenn.
Pagan Fallk
Pagan held the ball but was
knocked off balance. His throw to
the plate, trying to get the slow-
moving Howard, came in on a
bounce and catcher Ed Bailey
couldn't handle it. Howard scored
on the sacrifice fly.
It appeared Howard might
have been out if Bailey held
Pagan's throw but there was no-
error scored on the play.

By BOB ZWINCK
Nebraska proved a point last
Saturday: stop right halfback
Dave Raimey and Michigan's
ground attack is prone to falter.
And when four quarterbacks
cannot connect on passes to gain
much-needed yardage-well, it's
bound to be a rough day against
any opponent.
Raimey lugged the pigskin 17
times, twice as often as any other
runner, and picked up 59 yards.
This total represents over a third
of Michigan's ground game. Yet
he was injured in the.second half
and did not return to action.
Sophomore quarterback B o b
Timberlake, inserted in the lineup
to try and shore up a sagging of-

inept, except on different plays.
Early in the week Coach Bump
Elliott complained that when a.

'.

man was open, the pass was bad; :officials.
and when the pass was on target, Nicklaus, who needs three quar-
the ball was dropped. Ron Kocan ters of study to qualify for a
caught two tosses for 26 yards. bachelor's degree in the College
Jack Strobel also caught two, good of Commerce, was upset at the
for 24 yards. ruling handed down by Dean J. R.
GRI D.SE LECTION S
At Midnight tonight The Michigan Daily's grid picks contest
ends. If your entries aren't in by then, you'll have to wait until next
week to play when the list of 20 games will be even tougher-Michigan-
Michigan State, for example. Bring or mail your entries to The Michi-
gan Daily, 420 Maynard St., and don't forget to include the score of
the Michigan-Army game.
This week's guest selector is Don Lund, who recently accepted a
position with the Detroit Tigers as director of minor league personnel
and scouting. This fall he provides the color for radio station WPAG
on Michigan broadcasts.
The prizes for the winner are two free passes to the Michigan
Theatre, now showing Peter Sellers' "I Like Money," and a subscrip-
tion to The Football News, a weekly gridiron paper.
THIS WEEK'S GAMES

COLUMBUS (AP)-National Open'
Champion Jack Nicklaus, who quit
the pro golf tour to resume his
studies at Ohio State, has with-
drawn at the request of university

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Still hugry for more runs with fense, ran seven times for 36 yards.
Ford always a question mark in The passing attack (excuse the
the late innings, the Yanks picked expression) was headed by each
up a sixth run in the ninth. member of the highly-touted
Manager Ralph Houk of the quartet of signal callers. Starter
Lanks named Ralph Terry, a 26- Dave Glinka completed three of
year-old right-hander with a 23- eight, Bob Chandler connected on
12 record in regular season, to one of five, Timberlake on two of
pitch -today's second game here. four, and Evashevski on one of
Jack Sanford (24-7) will pitch three.
for the Giants. Pass receivers were equally
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7.
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9.
10.

Consensus Picks in Caps
Army at MICHIGAN
Illinois at NORTHWESTERN
Indiana at WISCONSIN
Southern California at IOWA
No. Carolina at MICH. STATE
Navy at MINNESOTA
PURDUE at Notre Dame
OHIO STATE at UCLA
Columbia at PRINCETON
HOLY CROSS at Colgate.

(Consensus-31-9-.775)
11. Louisiana St. at GA. TECH
12. Georgia at SOUTH CAROLINA
13. DUKE at Florida
14. AUBURN at Kentucky
15. Iowa State at NEBRASKA
16. Arkansas at TEX. CHRISTIAN
17. PENN STATE at Rice
18. Oregon State at STANFORD
19. UTAH at Wyoming
20. PITTSBURGH at California

DAVE ANDREWS (Associate Sports Editor, 29-11-.725)-Mich., NW, Wis,
Iowa, MSU, Minn., Pur., OSU, Prince., HC, LSU, S. Car., Duke, Ky., Neb., Ark.,
Rice, Ore. St., Utah, Pitt.
PETE DiLORENZI (29-11-.725)-Army, NW, Wis., Iowa, MSU, Minn., Pur.,
OSU, Col., HC, LSU, Ga., Duke, Ky., Neb., Ark., Penn St., Stan., Wyo., Pitt.
STAN KUKLA (29-11-.725)-Mich., NW., Wis., Iowa, MSU, Minn., Pur., OSU,
Prince., Colg., Ga. Tech, S. Car., Duke, Aub., Neb., TCU, Penn St., Stan., Wyo.,
Pitt.
JIM BERGER (28-12--.700)---Army, NW, Wis., Iowa, MSU, Minn., ND, OSU,
Prince., HC, Ga. Tech, S. Car.; Duke, Aub., Neb., TCU, Penn St., Stan., Utah,
Wyo.
DAVE GOOD (28-12-.700)-Mich., NW, Wis., Iowa, MSU, Minn., Pur., OSU,
Prince., HC, Ga. Tech, S. Car., Fia., Aub., Neb., TCU, Penn St., Stan., Utah, Pitt.
BOB ZWINCK (28-12-.700)-Army, NW, Wis., USC, MSU, Minn., ND, OSU,
Prince., HC, LSU, Ga., Duke, Ky., Ia. St., TCU, Penn St., Stan., Wyo., Pitt.
DON LUND, Detroit Tiger Director of Minor League Operations (Guest Selec-
tor, 28-12-.700)-Mich., NW, Wis., Iowa, MSU, Minn., Pur., OSU, Col., HC, Ga.
Tech, Ga., Fla., Aub., Neb., Ark., Penn St., Stan., Utah, Pitt.
MIKE BLOCK (27-13-.675)-Mich., .NW, Wis;, Iowa, MSU, Minn., Pur., OSU,
Prince., HC, Ga. Tech, Ga., Fla., Aub., Neb., Ark., Penn St., Stan., Utah, Pitt.
JAN WINKELMAN (Associate Sports Editor, 27-13-.675)-Mich., NW, Wis.,
Iowa, MSU, Minn.,. Pur., OSU, Col., Ga. Tech, S. Car., Duke, Aub., Neb., TCU,
Rice, Stan., Utah, Pitt.
JERRY KALISHI (26-14-.650)-Mich., NW, Wis., $owa, MSU, Minn., Pur.,
08U, Prince., HC, LSU, Ga., Duke, Ky., Ia. St., Ark., Penn St., Ore. St., Utah,
Pitt.
JOHN SCOCHIN (26-14-.650)-Mich., NW, Wis., Iowa, MSU, Minn., ND, OSU,
Prince., HC, Ga. Tech, S. Car., Duke, Aub., Neb., TCU, Rice, Stan., Utah, Pitt.
TOM WEBBER (Sports Editor, 25-15-.625)-Mich., NW, Wis., Iowa, MSU,
Minn., Pur., OSU, Prince., HC, Ga. Tech, Ga., Duke, Ky., Ia. St., TCU, Penn St.,
Ore. St., Utah, Pitt.

McCoy less than two weeks after
the start of the fall quarter.
"I don't like it," Nicklaus said.
"I don't like to be told I can't
go to school. I've missed classes
to play golf every quarter I've
been at Ohio State and I feel I
could meet my commitments and
still do the required work."
Included in the commitments he
mentioned are a two-week golf
tour of Australia and another week
for the filming of a television golf
show. Thus Nicklaus would miss
about three weeks of the normal
12-week study period.
Dean McCoy said he had con-
ferred with Nicklaus' Instructors
before making his decision. "Their
judgment was that he could not
miss that much class time and
still complete the requirements
satisfactorily," Dean McCoy said,
adding: "He can withdraw in good
standing and come back whenever
he has time."
Nicklaus, who presently stands
in third place for the year among
golf's leading money winner, said
he has not had time to make any
plans for the immediate future.
"I suppose it hurts most," Nick-
laus added, "because I came off
perhaps the best streak of golf
I've ever played to return to
school."
Grid Powers
Exchanging
Informnation
UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. (P)-
Penn State, Syracuse, Pittsburgh
and West Virginia are exchanging
information on scholastic stan-
dards and admission requirements
in a continuing effort to achieve
a high level of integrity in ath-
letics a Penn State spokesman
said yesterday.
The schools have not advanced
to the realm of sharing informa-
tion on recruiting techniques, the
spokesman said, but hope to in-
clude this phase in a long range
plan of cooperation.
The four schools some time ago
agreed to eliminate redshirting of
athletes, thus saving a year of
eligibility for later on. A Pitts-
burgh spokesman said the ex-
change of information is done at
a president's level and goes no
further. Athletic directors and
coaches do not see the informa-
tion. He said the practice has been
in effect for about 18 months.
The exchange is "primarily a
guarantee of academic integrity
of the institutions concerned.
Sox' Aparicio
Fed Up; Asks
To Be Traded
By The Associated Press
MARACAIBO - Luis Aparicio,
American League All-Star short-
stop with the Chicago White Sox,
has announced formally that he
would like to be playing ball with
another club when the 1963 sea-
son opens up.
Aparicio, who claims that dur-
ing the season he was offered two
contracts for next season by the
White Sox-both with salary cuts
-says that he would like to leave
the White Sox "since the White
Sox will need 40 years to win the
American League pennant again."
He added that he would rather
remain at home in Maracaibo than
take one of the proposed salary
cuts.
Aparicio has been the American
League's All-Star shortstop for
five years. The only year since
1958 when he has not held the
post was when Ron Hansen of the

Baltimore Orioles beat him out in
1960.
Two years ago, he led the Ameri-
can League in stolen bases with
56.

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