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October 05, 1962 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-10-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

,TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

vlaTTAvr r%~dlmenlm IV "nwwi A

TWO THE MICHIGAN DAILY

VUIDAY, OCTOBER 5, 1962

I,

Roberts Describes Religious Humanism,
Denial of Calvinistic Doctrine by Camus

1 t

EDUCATION:
Morton Views Opinions
On Teaching Machines

1 .!

By RICHARD KRAUT

"Albert Camus walked the tight-
rope between faith and despair
called courage."
With this, Prof. Preston Roberts
of the University of Chicago Di-
vinity School Wednesday describ-
ed the religious humanism of Al-
bert Camus.
Camus accepted neither existen-
tialism nor Christianity, he con-
tinued. The former led to a neg-
ative type of despair while the
latter "jumped too quickly into
faith," he said.
Middle Ground
Instead he developed a middle
ground - a religious humanism
that was disciplined, vigorous and
modest while also courageous in
its attempt to be both intellec-
tually honest and philosophically
positive.
Like Jean-Paul Sartre and other
modern athiestic existentialists,
Camus realized that man, by his
Very nature, has certain aspira-

tions and hopes which cannot be
fulfilled, Prof. Roberts noted.
The realization of this dilemma
is the source of man's despair,
according to Sartre. For Camus,
however, this dilemma can be a
source of creativity and happiness,
he said.
Rebelled Against Dilemma
By rebelling against the dilemma
of man's ability to distinguish be-
tween the way he should be and
the way he actually is, one can
fully develop as a human being.
What is left after the denial of
faith and despair is some kind
of humanistic courage, Prof. Rob-
erts observed. If there is no God
that one can trust, then one must
trust man. Therefore, Camus "cel-
ebrates what it means to be a
human being." .
This celebration of man results
in a reversal of traditional Calvin-
ist doctrine, he added. For Camus,
happiness is routed in man and if
he is unhappy, it would not be
his own fault.
Happiness in God
On the other hand, Calvin would
maintain that happiness is routed
in God andif man is unhappy, it
is his own fault, he noted.
Camus, Prof Roberts noted, was
concerned with the problem of
natural evil-that is, the evil that

befalls man from without and
which he does not bring upon him-
self.
He thought that Christianity
largely ignored the problems of
natural evil and that when it did
cope with the problem, it gave
transcendental answers that did
not effectively deal with the dif-
ficulties.
Prof. Roberts also pointed out
what he considered to be the
faults in Camus' philosophy. Be-
ing Algerian, he was not at all
acquainted with the Protestant
religion.
APA To Hold,
Football Sho'w

The Association
Artists has adopted

of Producing
an innovation

.....

wrw- 1

DIAL 8-6416
SHOWS AT 7 - 9 P.M.
HELD OVER

for football and theatre fans in
the form of a six p.m. post-foot-
ball matinee.
The ' performance will end at
eight p.m. and the later tomorrow
performance will begin at nine
p.m.
Sunday matinees will be pre-
sented during the Fall Festival of
five plays at 3 p.m.

By KENNETH WINTER
Programmed instruction-I
"teaching machines"-is part of
"the new technology of educa-
tion," Prof. F. Rand Morton of the
Spanish department told the Uni-
versity Press Club Friday.
Teaching machines educate a
student by presenting subject ma-
terial in a logical sequence of
steps and requiring the student to
answer questions at each step.
They are "either the most ex-
citing tool in education today, or
the most feared perversion of edu-
cation possible - depending on
whom you ask," Prof. Morton re-
marked.
Exciting Tool
Prof. Morton believes the for-
mer evaluation to be more accu-
rate. "Programmed instruction is
an attempt to exploit more per-
fectly what has been learned
about how man learns," he said.
He explained that, since a stu-
dent can work at his own speed,
he learns faster. Faster learners
are not bored and slow students
are not lost as in a regular class-
room.
The student also learns imme-
diately whether his answer to a
teaching machine question is cor-
rect -a procedure which facili-
tates retention of the material,
Prof. Morton commented.
Answer Correctly
The machine courses are de-
signed so the student will answer
almost every question correctly,
which gives him a feeling of sat-
isfaction, he said.
The simplefact that the stu-
dent is participating in the learn-

from the student to the program-
mer," he commented.
ing process, rather than passively
reading or hearing a lecture,
makes the experience more intense
and improves his memory of the
subject, Prof. Morton explained.
Prof. Morton also viewed the
objections to the use of pro-
grammed instruction. He said that
some people claim it is anti-
creative and will bring standard-
ization of the educational experi-
ence. This is considered inimical
to the purposes of higher educa-
tion.
He admitted that there is a
problem here. "Now that we can
guarantee results, we must be very
careful to teach the right thing.
Programmed instruction shifts the
responsibility for what is learned

Heiller Notes Quality, Symbols
In Bach Musca Comosiion

'U' Pianist
To Perform
For Children
Prof. Gyorgy Sandor of the Mu-
gic School, internationally famous
concert artist and professor of
piano, left yesterday for Guada-
lajara, Mexico, to give a benefit
concert for underprivileged in the
Hospicio.
His performance inaugurates a
series of concerts patronized by
Mrs. Gil Preciado, wife of the gov-
ernor of the state of Jalisco. San-
dor has played regularly in Gua-
dalajara for the past 20 years.
Sandor, who joined the Music
School staff in September, 1961,
is in a unique position to make a
valuable contribution to his ad-
vanced piano students. He played
concerts all over Europe, South
America, Australia, North Africa.

The Ann Arbor Recreation De-
partment has anounced that it will
sponsor a fencing club.
Mrs. Richard Jennings, coordin-
ator, said that the program will
provide the only opportunity to
obtain fencing instruction locally.
The program is open to all per-
sons.
Instructor Istvan Danoski will
give instructions every Tuesday
and Thursday at Slauson Jr. High
School.
Danoski is a one-time Hun-
garian fencing master and Hun-

INTERNATIONAL CULTURAL
EVENING
TONIGHT... featuring Classical Music
7:30-9:30 P.M.
International Center Lounge
Refreshments -- Informal
EVERYONE WELCOME

garian Olympics coach who de-
fected to the West during the 1956
Revolution, and presently coaches
for the Wayne State University
team and is master at Salle de
Tuscan fencing club in Detroit.
A new 12-week session will begin
Tuesday. Non-members of the club
may take part in the instruction
program but not the Friday night
fencing sessions in the Intramural
Bldg.
Enrollment before the season
begins will be at a reduced fee.

Group Forms Fencing Club
For Ann Arbor Recreation,

I1

I

Colle ge'
S TO INDIA A 'm
ND
By CAROLYN WINTER
SWOIRDS...TJE TARTARS ARE COMING O yCRLNWNE
G-M EVANSTON, Ill.-National Pan-'
hellenic Conference has refused
N WELLS to allow sorority women at North-
western University to answer a
ARTAR$ Student Senate questionnaire con-
MlON cerning discrimination.
4DAY * Last May NPC refused a sim-
/ARD WINNING ilar request to allow the Student
-THE MUD BELOW" Senate Human Relations Council
to distribute a sorority bias ques-
tionnaire.,
The proposed questionnaire con-
Dial 5-6290 tained five questions which dealt
Starting Today with the racial and religious atti-
tudes of sorority members.
Preview Tonight Mrs. Mary Collins, chairman of
the National Panhellenic Confer-
The Hilarious ence's Committee on Research and
Public Relations, said that allow-
ing sorority women to answer a
questionnaire would be in violation
of a 1949 NPC ruling.
CAIRO, Ill.-Happenings at the
University of Mississippi "inspir-
ed" integrationist leaders in Cairo
to further their campaign.
In a flare-up last week, 67 teen-
agers were arrested for picketing a
grocery that refused to hire Ne-
groes. The police hurled tear-gas
shells to disperse the demonstra-
tors.
WASHINGTON, D.C.-On Sept.
24, a coffin bearing a sign "Bury
~ Jim Crow," carried by four "pall-
bearers," headed a 24-hour vigil
and fast conducted by the Con-
gress of Racial Equality in front
of the White House to mark the
centennial of the Emancipation
Proclamation. Over 100 CORE
members participated.
* * *
COLUMBUS, Ohio-The Student
Senate at Ohio State University
approved a referendum which will
have the student body determine
if theuniversity should remain in
the National Student Association.
ATHENS, Ohio-"When recog-
nized student groups consult with
their faculty advisers and invite
a speaker to appear on the cam-
pus, I shall defend their decision
and their basic right to hear the
speaker of their choice," Ohio Uni-
versity President Alden said at a
COLOR by DE LUXE political convocation at the uni-
versity.

By JEFFREY K. CHASE
"Bach's music is always 'good'
music even though the listener
knows nothing about it.
"But it holds much meaning for
those who understand it," Anton
Heiller, guest organist and lecturer
at the Conference on Organ Music
sponsored by the music school
and the extension service, said
Tuesday.
Using the Bach chorale preludes
as his prime examples, in a lecture
on "The Interpretation of Bach,"
Heiller explained that when a
descending line is found, especially
in the bass line, it represents
Christ coming down to earth.
When the cantus firmus, the
major melody of a polyphonic
composition, is' the soprano line,
it signifies God the Father. When
the cantus firmus is either ap alto
or tenor line, the two middle lines,
it represents God the Son. Heiller
noted.
The rhythmic figure of a six-
teenth and two thirty-second
notes, found frequently in se-
quence, shows joy, especially of
Jesus who is jubilant with the
thought -of descending to earth to
save the people, Heiller continued.
The three-note figure, the middle
note of which is an octave lower
than the other two, which are the
same, followed by another three-
note figure, the middle note of
which is an octave higher than the
other two, represents Christ com-
ing down to earth so that the
people may ascent to heaven.
A figure consisting of a chord
tone surrounded by neighbor notes
suggests the Christ's crib. The
symbol of Christmas is a series
of dovetailed descending lines, he
said.

A three-note figure, the middle
tone of which is lower than the
'other two and the third tone of
which is higher than either ofnthe
other two, represents the cross.
Suspensions portray Jesus' suf-
fering while bound to the cross,
Heiller explained.
In the first chorale for Penti-
cost, one can find the two upper
lines containing the cross symbol
with the bass line consisting of
two eighth rests and an eighth
note, on the third beat. These
upper lines represent God as
Father and Son on the cross and
the bass symbolizes God as the
Holy Ghost.
When a passage is found in
which every figure is answered by
its inversion, it means that "every
cry from man to God is im-
mediately answered by God to
man," Heiller noted.

"CAN BE PROUD OF ITS OSCAR!"
-- Rose Pelswick, N.Y.

SPECIAL NOTE
Certain scenes in this Academy Award Winner Documentary Include
Unclothed Natives and for that reason ... Children Not Admitted
Unless Accompanied by Parents.
STARTING SUNDAY-STATE THEATRE

4

B'NAI B'RITH HILLEL FOUNDATION
1429 Hill Street
YOM KIPPUR SERVICES-in the Rackham Building
Sunday, Oct. 7, 7 P.M. Lecture Hall-Address: Prof. William Haber.
Monday, Oct. 8 - Traditional Service, 9 A.M., Lecture Hall - Yizker,
(Memorial Service) 11:30 A.M.
Reform Service, 10 A.M., Amphitheatre - Memorial Service 3:30 P.M.
BREAK-THE-FAST-DINNER

Journal American

Monday, 6:30 P.M. Michigan League Cafetheria
Choice: $1,75 complete dinner or as selected.
SABBATH SERVICES
Shabbat Shuva (Sabbath of Repentance, of Return)
-at HILLEL-Tonight at 7:30 P.M., Tomorrow, 9 A.M.

I-,

'.

a a a - a a a a a

So Go Co Cihetna fudd
Saturday and Sunday at 7:00 and 9:00 TONIGHT at 7:00 and 9:00
Resnais' HIROSHIMA, ALL THE KING'S MEN
MON AMOUR Broderick Crawford, Mercedes McCambridge,
Emmanuelle Riva, Eyi Okada John Ireland
SHORT: D. W. Griffith's Broken Ways, with (Rbt. Penn Warren's novel about Huey Long).
Blanche Sweet, Henry B. Walthall, Harry Carey 3 ACADEMY AWARDS. Cartoon
ALL SHOWS 50c at the ARCHITECTURE AUDITORIUM
Next Week's Attraction - William Wyler's - ROMAN HOLIDAY
Audrey Hepburn, Gregory Peck, Eddie Albert.* ACADEMY AWARD. Cartoon

I

t" I

I

I

$2.50
$1.50

1

I

I

FOR ADVANCE TICKETS
MAIL
Check or money order
to
LIMELITERS CONCERT
Student Activities Bldg.
Ann Arbor, Michigan

RIBBON
SNEAK PREVIEW

I.

: FROM A MoAJt StUDIO
The pctirefor the whole fa ily
ALL NEW COMEDY
(We cannot reveal title)
* A marital comedy

fI

1

r
AL.

"

of young newly-
weds .. . played
with verve and
. s ,nrk:..i

11

I

IUI N~ovembner up For sheer;mn..-u+it k,-eldo.I~m he ,..,,, .ledIAneve r rneelA

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