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September 11, 1962 - Image 20

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-09-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TI

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WILKINSON'S

'U' Counselors Help Solve Student Problems

OF BACK TO SCHOOL NEEDS
Shop Early and Avoid the Big Rush. Take advantage of our
no charge for initials service and our convenient charge or
$1.00 weekly budget plan.

By GERALD STORCH
For students in serious personal
trouble, or in need of advice on'
academic matters, there are a
myriad of counseling sources,
ranging from residence hall staff-
men to faculty professors to pro-
fessional counselors.
The University realizes its re-
sponsibility to provide services for
both the short and long-run needs
of students, . but maintains that
the initiative for seeking help
must emanate from the students.
"The University does not believe
in required, compulsory counsel-
ing," a faculty study committee
on counseling wrote in 1958. "lhis

principle rests on the premise that
each student must be given ma-
neuver room to make his own
choices-to be relatively free to
struggle with his educational
problems himself and to resolve
them with or without outside
help."
Various Agencies
The counseling agencies on cam-
pus can be roughly, divided into
three kinds: those for academic
counseling, units under the Office
of Student Affairs, and the more
delicate psychological counseling
bureaus.
Each school and college at the
University provides certain per-

sonnel, at the deanship and uro-
fessorial level, to counsel students
on academic matters.
It is hard to generalize about
counseling as practiced in the dif-
ferent academic units, but usually
aid is given to help students ulan
their future courses, make sure
they fulfill their requirements for
graduation, and advise them on
educational opportunities within
the various curricula and the rela-
tionships to career possibilities.
Academic Counselors
Course selections must be made
through academic counselors; oth-
erwise, students are encouraged to,
consult with them on any matter'

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they feel necessary. However, if
the student is having problems
with grades, often a counselor will
contact him and ask him to come
in for a talk.
Some schools assign counselors
to students, while in other units
students are free to choose their
own faculty advisor.
Besides the counseling services
in each school, students desiring
information and advice concern-
ing admissions policies may con-
sult with any of the nine profes-
sional counselors in the Office of
Admissions, located in the Admin-
istration Bldg.
Admission Aid
Freshmen and transfer students
often receive aid for their spe-
cial problems regarding admit-
tance and registration at this of-
fice.
The OSA is concerned with
counseling of any type of personal
or financial situation, excluding
only the purely academic.
Although Mark Noffsinger, a
special assistant to the vice-presi-
dent for student affairs, will han-
dle most of these matters, counsel-
ing services are also available in
the OSA directorships.
The directors of housing, finan-
cial aids and discipline will all
have counseling duties included in
their areas of authority.
Sub-Units
other sub-units within the OSA
have counseling facilities.
The International Center pro-
vides specialized personnel to help
ease the cross-cultural impact on
foreign students; the Office of
Religious Affairs counsels stu-
dents with problems involving re-
ligion; the Bureau of Appoint-
ments is ready to guide students
searching for jobs.

The Bureau of Psychological
Services, whose offices are located
in Rackham Bldg., maintains gen-
eral and specific services for stu-
dents in need of vocational or so-
cial adjustment.
Reading Program
The reading improvement divi-
sion provides aids for students
needing individual help in reading
and study skills.
The stuent counseling division
gives assistance for emotional and
vocational needs of students. Al-
though difficult or delicate cases
are often referred to this unit from
the OSA, it is not a therapeutic
agency, and if medical problems
are suspected, students are re-
ferred to the mental hygiene cen-
ter.
This department handles stu-
dents with physical disturbances
of the nervous system, and en-
counters problems from the rela-
tively simple to the acute. It is
part of Health Service.
Speech Therapy
The Institute for Human Ad-
justment provides speech &nd
hearing therapy.
University officials realize, of
course, there is an irreducible
overlap in these agencies, but be-
lieve that each unit points toward
the end product of an individual
who, as the counseling study com-
mittee wrote, "has acquired the
tools requisite for full intellectual,
social and vocational develop-
ment."
Efforts are being made, how-
ever, at greater coordination be-
tween the various agencies. Noff-
singer is to establish liaison with
all of them, and to maintain his
office as a center of information
for al counseling organizations.

v

CASUAL CLUTCH
IDEAL for casual wear, school, or sports.
Holds all essentials neatly in compact in-
terior. In washable leather specially aged
and tanned to make it soft as its name,
"Puff," by Seton. Assorted colors. $2.95
Other Campus Favorites
You'll find thousands of handbags .
one of the largest selections in the state
... including such famous names as Theo-
dore, Coblentz, Mamselle.

L

* PRICES PLUS EXISTING TAXES
WILKINSON LUGGAGE SHOP
"'Where Luggage Is Sold-With Dignity"
MON. and FRI. T'IL 8:30 TUES., WED., THURS., and SAT. 9 to 5:30
327 S. Main St. AIR-CONDITIONED Phone NO 3-4013
New Entrance from City's 4th Ave .Parking Lot

+ Use Daily Classifieds +

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it ( )7t. £ tudeht4
Welcome to Ann Arbor

BICYCLE
AUCTION

Make your Headquarters at
Bo.E.
FOR
"Famous Name" BED-SPREADS
No finer and wider selection to be found anywhere.
Woven, Tufted and Heirloom Types by Bates, Cannon or Morgan-
Jones in a wide range of colors and patterns
from $5.98 up
.....................g............ .........s......
"Famous Name" BLANKETS
in various Blends, Acrilan or Wool.
Plaids, Floral Patterns or Solid Colors
from 4.98 up
BED PILLOWS
KOOLFOAM, DACRON or DOWN FILLED
from $4.98 u
...............................................r..... .... ..
DECORATOR PILLOWS
Kapok- or Foam Rubber filled
n, a beautiful assortment of fabrics, colors and sizes
from - 1.98 up
CURTAINS and DRAPES
"Ready-to-hang" or by the yard in a wide selection of styles,
textures, sizes and colors
At Prices You Can Afford
DRESS FABRICS
The most complete line of yard goods in town!
Cottons, Synthetics and Woolens in the season's newest fabrics.
Plus everything in SEWING AIDS and NOTIONS

About 200 Used Bicycles to be sold-Some Nearly New.
(impounded before July 1-Unclaimed by September 19)
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, Beginning 10 A.M.
at
BICYCLE STORAGE GARAGES
(Located on E. Washington St. just off Forest)
OFFICE OF THE VICE-PRESIDENT FOR STUDENT AFFAIRS

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UNIVERSITY
BICYCLE CONTROL PROGRAM
1. The primary aim of the bicycle control program is safety-keeping bicycles away from
building exits, plate glass windows, and off sidewalks. To guarantee safety, bicycles
should be parked in the racks provided.
2. To provide added parking spaces it is necessary to keep the racks cleared of "abandoned"
or "stolen" bicycles-at times as many as 300 spaces have been so occupied.
3. In order to keep a careful check on bicycles left in rocks and to comply with the Ann
Arbor City Ordinance, any bicycle on University property (University owned apartments,
residence halls, classroom areas, Medical Center, etc.) must bear a current Ann Arbor
license (expiring 9-30-63).

ASSISTANCE-Troubled students receive psychological counsel-
ing in the student counseling division of the Psychological Serv-
ices Bureau. This-agency, located in the Health Service Bldg., pro-
vides outpatient treatment of mental problems.
WILDMA

11

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4. Unlocked bicycles or those secured by a combination "chain lock" provide an open in-
vitation for bicycle "borrowers or thieves"-last year over 200 licensed bicycles were
reported stolen but were not recovered.
UNIVERSITY BICYCLE REGULATIONS
LICENSING. As a service to students, City Licenses (fee 50c) may be obtained in the
Lobby of the Student Activities Building September 12-14 and September 17-21 (9 a.m.
to 4 p.m.). After September 23, -licenses will be sold only at the Office of the City Clerk
in the City Hall. If in doubt about your serial number, please request help to check it.
REMEMBER TO SAVE YOUR BICYCLE REGISTRATION CARD-IT IS YOUR ONLY
PROOF OF OWNERSHIP IF YOU WISH TO SELL YOUR BICYCLE OR IF IT IS STOLEN.
If a bicycle is lost or stolen, the owner should report the loss as soon as possible at the OFFICE.
OF STUDENT AFFAIRS in the Student Activities Building or to the Ann Arbor Police
Department. In order to file the report you should have your BICYCLE REGISTRATION
CARD which must bear the correct serial number on your bicycle.
If you purchase a used bicycle from a shop or an individual, be sure to get a receipt which
includes the name of the sellor and the serial number on the bicycle which you have
personally checked. Licenses are not transferable.
PARKING. Bicycles must be parked in racks. At times rack space may not be available
adjacent to your classroom building or may be available only after the change of classes.
Parking on the grass off the pavement is permitted only ift all rack spaces in the vicinity
of the building are full. At no time shall a bicycle be parked under a canopy or near an
exit.
STORING. Bicycle racks in the classroom areas are for parking and should not be used for
storage. If you live outside the city or at a distance which requires you to leave your
bicycle on campus day and night, you are asked to notify this office (Ext. 3146) or it
may be impounded.
BORROWING. A recent City Ordinance classes the unauthorized use of a bicycle, without
intent to steal, as a misdemeanor. Several students have found themselves serving time
in jail and paying a stiff fine for just such "borrowing."
UNIVERSITY IMPOUNDING PROGRAM
1. Bicycles parked illegally on sidewalks, under canopies, or blocking building exits will be
impounded.
2. Bicycles on University property which do not bear a current (1963) Ann Arbor License
will be impounded.
3. Bicycles stored (left over 48 hours) in classroom areas will be impounded. During vaca-

adapted from the
international favorite
of the Champions
at the Olympics.
LODEN FREY OUTERCOATS
from Austria
$29.95
nA
WRY -

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to make sewing easy .
mm m ...mm ..m............. ...m mm.. m m mm ...............mm. ...'.mm .... m
-ALSO-
Sheets and Pillow Cases, Bath Towels, Mattress Pads and Covers,
Scatter Rugs, Laundry Bags, Shoe Bags, Wardrobe Bags,
Bath Mats and Shower Curtains, etc.
5EEE~E.UE EI U- A.

1I

111911

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