100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 29, 1962 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-09-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE TWO

TIMTi 'firYr=rTr_ ,L '#T 71 A WW V7

-AE-WO___________________ i i71uViI1iAjjj IV L. WWEUA :U 1UNN ' -.YW SN

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 196Z

2

EXPRESSION OF NEED':
Potter Explains Activism

By MARTHA MacNEAL
"Our concept of student acti-
vism is an expression of our need
to find a symbol around which we
can unite," Paul Potter, former
national affairs vice-president for
the United States National Stu-
dent Association, said Thursday.
Potter spoke on "Student Poli-
tical Action" at the open meeting
of Voice Political Party.
Discussing the "very old ques-
tion of origins--why are we involv-
ed in student politics?", he noted
that this question is asked only of
student action, not of national po-
litical parties or Rotary Clubs.
"This is because we have grown
up with the others, and Voice
stands somewhat in opposition to
them. In opposing; them, we are
thus opposing a part of ourselves,"
he said.
Lack of Rationalism
"The question has no rational
answer," Potter continued. "It is
just better to be here than to be
somewhere else. It is somehow in-

trinsically satisfying to be part of
the movement."
Defining the nature of student
activism, he maintained that "we
elevate activism, and give it more
meaning than it really deserves.
This is our kinetic symbolism, a
symbolism of people in motion."
He cited the administration of
President John F. Kennedy as an
example of the sense of motion
that failed. "When he moved into
office, we began to feel this ki-
netic symbolism, and were identi-
fied with a new style. But some-
how the symbol has soured-Ken-
nedy has failed toscarry out our
aspirations. The Cuban invasion
was an example of what an activ-
ist Administration had done. It
acted; and that disillusioned a lot
of us''
Kennedy Allusion
Potter feels that the student
movement may be in the same
danger as the Kennedy adminis-
tration, the danger of presenting

Power Cites Council's Role
In Coordinating Universities

an image of motion that is not a
substantive image.
"We should begin to turn some
of our attention inward, to see if
we can construct the kind of in-
terrelations among men which are
satisfying enough so that we
should project them into the fu-
ture," he said.
Potter considers the student
movement something of an anom-
aly in American political tradition
"or lack of political tradition."
U.S. Apolitical
"America is essentially an apoli-
tical nation," he said. "We have
no well demarcated political groups
with large memberships. American
politics is theoretical but unreal,
not something that is a part of us.
The political parties show no
awareness that political expression
is part of man," he continued.
"Student activism in this country
is almost without historical prec-
edent."
Potter feels that students in the
1950's were "insulated from in-
formation about what was going
on" rather than apathetic. But a
real danger of student apathy
exists now, "when the individual
may be fully informed on all the
issues, and may still say" I don't
want to do anything'."
Three New Elements
Nevertheless, he cited a great ex-
pansion in student involvement
that continued last year. "There
are three new elements in student
activism, especially evident in the
February Peace March on Wash-
ingtongreater sophistication, in-
creased membership, and more ac-
tive support from other groups."
Following Potter's address, the.
audience divided into discussion
groups on research into national
political party structure, the Port
Huron Statement of the Students
for a Democratic Society, the peace
movement, civil rights, the Univer-
sity and SGC, civil liberties, and
administrative problems.
ORGANIZATION
NOTICES

By KENNETH WINTER
The Michigan Coordinating
Council for Higher Education is a
device "to coordinate our state
colleges and universities without
smothering their creative work,"
Regent Eugene B. Power said yes-
terday.
Addressing the University Press
Club, Regent Power viewed the
problems of cooperation between
tax-supported schools within a
state, and explained why he feels
the Coordinating Council is an ef-
fective answer to them.
Limited State Funds
The problem, basically, is that
a state's colleges and universities
must make the best use of the lim-
ited state funds available..
If there is no inter-school. co-
operation, rivalries and conflicts
develop between the institutions,
and the educational process as a
whole suffers, Regent Power said.
On the other hand, too much
merging of the state's schools will
result in a centralized administra-
tion divorced from the problems of
each campus, he added.
Another solution to the coop-
eration problem has been the Leg-
islative Commission, a board cen-
tered in the state capital.
Legislative Commission
The Legislative Commission's
advantages have been outweighed
by its disadvantages because it is
too subject to political control, Re-
gent Power commented.
Regent Power feels the answer
is a setup like Michigan's Coordi-
nating Council, working on the
principle of "self-imposed volun-
tary cooperation between the
schools of the state."
Ut

MARTIN LUTHER KING
... plans lectures

King Plans
To Lec ture
On Campus
By CAROLYN WINTER
The Office of Religious Affairs
and the special projects commit-
tee of the Michigan Union have
announced that Rev. Martin Luth-
er King will give two lectures in
Hill Aud. on Nov. 5.
The afternoon speech which will
be at 4 p.m. is entitled "Moral Is-
sues in Discrimination," with the
subtitle "The American Dream."
'Future of Integration'
"What Does the Negro Citizen
Want?" is the title of the evening
lecture which will be at 8 p.m.,
with the subtitle "The Future of
Integration."
Rev. King holds the title of lec-
turer at Morehouse College in At-
lanta, and is president of the
Southern Christian Leadership
Conference.
Among Rev. King's publications
are two books, "Stride Toward
Freedom" and "The Measure of a
Man.''
Part of Series
These lectures are part of the
fall series of lectures and concerts
sponsored by the Office of Reli-
gious Affairs.
Prof.sPreston Roberts of the
University of Chicago will open
the series with a lecture entitled
"The Religious Humanism of Al-
bert Camus" on Wednesday, Oct.
3 in Aud. A.
The lecture will emphasize his
literary works rather than his
philosophical works. The talk will
be centered on his three novels,
"The Stranger," "The Plague,"
and "The Fall." Prof. Preston will
discuss how Camus tries to find
a method of getting or moving
beyond despair.
Schedule Concert
Also in the fall series will be a
concert by the Ann Arbor Canta-
ta singers conducted by Rosella
Duerksen. The program will be all
Bach cantatas and will include
Cantatas 21, 50 and 161. The con-
cert will be held at 8:30 p.m., Nov.
19 in Rackham Lecture Hall.
The concluding lecture of the
series will be given by Prof. Paul A.
Schilpp of Northwestern Univer-
sity, who will speak on "The Stu-
dent and Present World Impacts"
at 4:15 on Dec. 12 in Aud. A.

SEEKS POLITICAL ASYLUM:
Dancer, Dinka
By MARY GOODFELLOW
of the Detroit Free Press ily nickname which
.recognize.
PARIS () - Time was a vi- Both Fear]
cious whip Thursday, driving Ste- The gruff voice said
phen Dinka and me close to panic. carry a message to
The night before, he had been quarters. Dinka askei
only a few feet from Emese come to the dormito
Szklenkay, his pretty sister-in-law did not object, but w
whom he was trying to spirit away up we both were feai
from a Communist Hungarian At 8:50 a.m., Dinka
dance troupe on tour. The next ly into the College
morning, after only four hours of dark, cold lobby, an
sleep, we met again to plan some young men. They w
more, but with a sinking feeling of speaking Hungarian.
failure. to chat and sudden]
In her letter to Mrs. Dinka in Emese, walking towa
Ann Arbor, the girl had said she a bright, knowing s
would be in Paris' on Sept. 19-21. ognition.
It was now the 20th. She embraced him
Dangerous Game just right for an old:
We knew now that the following family. The young ,
day - perhaps even early in the course knew Emese,
morning - Emese's Hungarian to sit down. Dinka
dancentroupe would fly back the young men. And
through the Iron Curtain and we born during his 38 mu
would have lost our dangerous sian prison camps a
game of cat-and-mouse. under Communist rul
ing Hungary, he sus
More important, Emese would were being watched. B
have lost her one chance at free- calmly, and finally, t
dom. picion, he blandly inv
Dinka and I decided to make to lunch later with th
separate assaults. dent restaurant. The
Interview Ruse Political Mat
He was to go first. If he failed, Then he asked En
I could still try using an interview if she'd like to go ou
ruse, of coffee. She excused
Our ears sharing the telephone voice tight and unlik
receiver, we placed a call to the equally casual, asked 1
dormitory. matron" for permiss
A French voice answered. I granted. This was th
asked for Emese Szklenkay "with "Walk, smile and 1
the Hungarian national dancers." Dinka warned.
There was a long pause. Around a corner,
Then a man spoke sharply in down a taxi.
Hungarian. Dinka picked up the It was done.
conversation smoothly and said he At exactly 10:30 th
was an old friend of Emese's fam- the elated Dinka push
ily, "just passing through" Paris. door at the Hotel Cas
He gave the name "Pityu," a fam- There was work to

Emese would

ful
d he could not
the women's
d if he could
ry. The man
hen we hung
rful.
walked bold-
Neederlains'
d found two
were dancers,
He sat down-
y there was
rd him with
;mile of rec-
warmly -
friend of the
men, who of
asked them
didn't trust
with a sense
nths in Rus-
and matured
l before flee-
spected they
But he talked
to allay sus-
ited the men
hem at a stu-
y agreed.
,ron
nese casually
ut for a cup
herself and,
e the bright
her "political
sion. It was
he moment.
talk to me,"
he flagged
Lat morning,
hed open my
tiglione.
Ddo - and

i
1

quickly. There would be danger
the moment Emese was missed.
From my hotel, it was a five-
minute walk to police headquar-
ters.
I told the authorities that Emese
wished to declare political asylum.
Surete agents drove us to the
United StatessEmbassy.eThere
were more forms, and a wealth of
understanding helpfulness.
The official routine continued
Friday - a call at the United Na-
tions Refugee and Migration
Office, an interview with the Cath-
olic Relief Service, Emese's spon-
soring agency, a medical examin-
ation.
That evening, an inconspicuous
grey sedan with two Surete agents
stopped at the hotel. Dinka, the
girl and I got in the back seat.
On this last step we were ex

tremely nervous, but the Surete
men were shrewdly observant and
reassuring.
Then, as we approached Orly
Airport, a furious discussion broke
out in the front seat. Alarmed, as
were Dinka and the girl, I lis-
tened. The agents grew more and
more agitated. They gestured
wildly, in typical French fashion.
Reporter Realizes
What was it all about? Sudden-
ly, I laughed.
Like a comedy, the two were
arguing about where to park.
The big jet was waiting and I
shook Stephen's big hand, and
kissed Emese.
Then they were gone. And be-
cause it seemed wise, I caught a
plane for Rome.
Tomorrow: A peculiar twist of fate
Copyright 1982; The Detroit Free Press

Flee Paris, Escape Reds

On this last step we were ex-
Copyright 1962; The Detroit Free Press

CnrTJmr.V ^R

m

c

CONTINUOUS FROM
1 P.M. SATURDAY
The prize winning comedy-drama of
a young girl's passionate love for life.

Dial
8-6416

.

--i

Preud uanOiected by Tony Rchardson
AContinental Distributing, Inc., Release
Winner of 4 British
Academy Awards-
"INCREDIBLE"
Time Magazine

Rita Tushingham
Winner Best Performance Award
Cannes Film Festival 1962
"Words Are Completely
Insufficient To Express
The True QualityAnds
Extent Of Eloquence
CatIntoThis Picture!"
-8selLr cEoWEnIS.

.6-

"BURBLING WITH HUMOR"
News Week

mmmmmmmm r

ib

Copley Cites Advances,
For SuperiorStudents

EUGENE B. POWER
... coordinating council
He predicted that the Coordinat-
ing Council "will become a nation-
al model" for intercollegiate co-
ordination.
Acts on Two Issues
He cited the Coordinating Coun-
cil's actions on two issues: the
question of a uniform speaker pol-
icy for the state's tax-supported
schools, and its handling of the
controversy over the establishment
of a two-year medical school at
MSU.
The latter issue would present
a formidable challenge to even
a w e 11- established coordinating
group, let alone an "infant" one
such as the Coordinating Council,
Regent Power commented.

USE OF THIS COLUMN for announce-
ments is available to officially recog-
nized and registered organizations only.
Organizations planning to be active for
the fail session should registersby
Oct. 8, 1962. Forms available, 1011 Stu-
dent Activities Bldg.
s . *
Congr. Disc. E & R Stud. Guild, His-
tory of Christian Thought, Rev. J. E.
Edwards, Coffee, 9:30-10:30 a.m.; "In
Consideration of Excerpts from G."B.
Shaw's 'A Black Girl in Search of
God'," continuing the series on Faith,
Inquiry and Intellect, 7:30 p.m.; Sept.
30, 802 Monroe.
Graduate Outing Club, Search for lost
airplane, Sept. 30, 2 p.m., Rackham
Bldg., Huron St. Entrance.
India Students' Assoc., Mahatma
Gandhi's Birthday Celebration, Lecture
by Dr. Sreenivasachar (Visiting Prof. of
History), Films on the life of Mahatma
Gandhi, Refreshments, Oct. 7, 7:30 p.m.,
Union, Rms. 3R-S. All welcome.
* * *
Newman Club, Dunker's Hour, After
Game, Movie: "Fr. Brown the Detec-
tive," starring Alec Guiness, 8 p.m.;
Sept. 29, 331 Thompson.
* * *
Unitarian Student Group, Panel on
"What Do Unitarians Believe?", Coffee
hour following, Sept. 30, 7:30 p.m., Uni-
tarian Church.

Institutions of higher education
in Michigan have made much,
though not enough, progress to-'
ward developing adequate pro-,
grams for gifted students, Prof.
Frank Copley of the classical lan-
guages department said yesterday.
Speaking to the University
Press Club, Prof. Copley said that
bright students should receive at
least as much educational oppor-
tunity to develop his special tal-
ents as the average or dull stu-
dent.
Ugly Caricature
Failure to provide the best for
the best "on grounds of some kind
of social equalitarianism is an ugly
caricature of a democracy," Prof.
Copley said.
He noted that Michigan high
schools are keenly aware of the
need for programs specially de-
signed for their best, and ablest
students.
But they are equally aware of
the inadequacies of existing pro-
grams and would welcome suitable
offers of assistance from the col-
leges..
Sputnik Helped
Prof. Copley said that the urgen-
cy of the problem is better un-
derstood today because various
factors, including the launching of

Sputnik I in 1957, have helped
change the attitude both of edu-
cators and the general public.
This attitude change has made
possible the programs necessary if
the encouragement of high-level
students is to become a realized
goal.
Prof. Copley warned, however,
against ill-defined and rigid pro-
grams that would tend to work a
hardship on the off-beat or highly
individualistic student.
Advanced Placement
Among the many schemes to en-
rich and accelerate the education
of the giftedstudent, the ad-
von~ced placement program is out-
standing, he said.
He a d d e d that "American
schools have done very well" by
their average and below-average
students.
"The establishment of programs
specially devised for our ablest
students will make our high
schools the truly comprehensive
institutions that we would like
them to be," he said.

S" * Co
TONIGHT and SUNDAY at 7and 9
PLACE IN THE SUN
Montgomery Clift, Elizabeth
Taylor, Shelley Winters
(Dreiser's American Tragedy)
ACADEMY AWARD
ARCHITECTURE AUDITORIUM
50 cents

"""

1

SHOWS
1, 3, 5, 7,S

t T

AT
V r~
9 P.M.
A NEW EXPLOSION FROM THE MAKER
OF "SINK THE BISMARK"

DIAL
5-6290

I-

THE CRY I

-f-r my

ALEC GUINNESS
t, DIRKBOGARDE
A .W.FILM Production
A COLUMBIA PICTURES RELEASE
r: ;-t

ELECTRONIC ADVANCE:
Commence IBM Computer Operations

i

The fastest and largest capacity
computer that International Busi-

TOMORROW-
DON'T MISS
"THEATER AT MICHIGAN"
A Panel discussion of the Professional Theater Program's
FALL FESTIVAL OF -PLAYS
. . .Featuring .
Dr. Warner G. Rice Prof. Claribel Baird
Dr. James J. Gindin Prof. Robert C. Schnitzer
Dr. Otto G. Graf Richard Baldridge
SUNDAY, SEPT. 30 ... 8:00. .". UNION BALLROOM

DIAL
2-6264

l

ENDING TODAY
DAVID NIVEN
"THE BEST
OF ENEMIES"

ness Machine Corp. has made
available to colleges went into op-
eration this week at the University.
The computer, the IBM 7090,
replaces an IBM 709 which had
been used at the Computing Cen-
ter for the past year.
The new machine has transistor
components instead of vacuum
tubes and computes at six times
the speed of its predecessor.
Six Times as Fast
The 7090 can add 10 decimal
digit numbers at the rate of 240,-
000 per second and store 32,768
words in its central core storage.
By contrast the IBM 709 could
only add 40,000 times per second.
It will be used by both students
and faculty in education and re-
search. Research activities in-
clude problems arising in Michigan
business and industry and many
problems from government pro-
grams in defense, electronics and

space, the computing center staff
points out.
The computer is used extensively
by faculty members engaged in
the University's $30 million annual
research program.
At the University more than
2,000 students in 97 courses must
use the computer to complete class
assignments - the most extensive
student use of a computer on any
college campus.
The college of engineering with
the support of the Ford Founda-
tion depends on the computer in
its three-year, $900,000 project to
determine how best to integrate
computer usage into undergradu-
ate engineering courses - a proj-
ect the nation's engineering
schools are following closely.
First in Country
The University was the first
school in the country to receive
IBM's largest (in terms of capacity
and computation speed) computer
under the corporation's regular
educational program.

The 7090 was installed in re-
sponse to the increasing demand
on computers being made by Uni-
versity students and faculty, an-
other step in a continual up-dating
of equipment.
The University has had a lead-
ing role in the development and
use of computers since they came
into wide acceptance after World
War II.

I

11

7jTe qetMic lt

62'cie tq

"Give her back to me. What does she mean to you-a handy
STARTING dame-two weeks of 'kicks' in another town?"
SUNDAY
-~ f
KINK $
EDWARD G.
no INSON
Iwin Shaw's shocking
intimate view of
Rome's international
fim set.
The world sees
only the glamor.;
This is the '.

i

announces
200 subscriptions available for its Fall series

I

ANN ARBOR CIVIC THEATRE

PERSONAL CINEMA
A series of films illustrating the concept of the motion picture
as the expression of the artist's personal vision.
October 8
JEAN RENOIR'S
THE GOLDEN COACH
In a film inspired by the Italian commedia dell'arte, the creator
of RULES OF THE GAME, THE GRAND ILLUSION, and PICNIC
ON THE GRASS seeks the line dividing art from life. Anna
Magnani stars, in what may be her finest performance.

LAST NIGHT-TONIGHT

"A HAPPY, GO-SEXY
LAUGH-FILLED SHOW."
Uulder the
m V r I 1k

r
t 1 tit

December 10
D. W. GRIFFITH'S
BROKEN BLOSSOMS
Certainly the most personal, and perhaps the greatest, of the
films by the creator of BIRTH OF A NATION and INTOLERANCE.
Starring Lillian Gish.
January 14
JEAN COCTEAU'S
LES PARENTS TERRIBLES
Tangled family relationships examined with overwhelming in-
tensity by one of the most individual of all film makers.
LUIS BUNUEL'S
LAND WITHOUT BREAD
Technically a documentary, this film by the creator of LOS
OLVIDADOS and VIRIDIANA for transcends conventional realism.
For sheer impact, it has seldom been eaualled. never surpassed.

October 29
F. W. MURNAU'S
NOSFERATU
of the supernatural by the creator of The
SUNRISE. In a recent poll of French film
selected as the greatest director in the history

,

A poetic evocation
LAST LAUGH and
critics, Murnau was
of cinema.

November 19

EI

I

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan