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September 29, 1962 - Image 5

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-09-29
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PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 1962

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 1962

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PROMISING GRIDDERS .
Sophomores Bolster Squad z A

(I
I

The Inside Corner
with Dave Andrews

Meet The Cornhw

By MIKE BLOCK
Today is opening day for the
1962 Michigan footbal season--
but it's also the debut of several
hopefuls-and perhaps apprehen-
sive--young men on Michigan's
team.
indeed, the chances are excellent
that today you will witness the
first of many fine performances
turned in by a heretofore unknown
sophomore back or lineman. After
all, there's no thrill in football
quite like the rookie-perhaps a
surprise starter-making the play
which insures a victory early in
the game or salvages one from the
throes of defeat just as the final
gun sounds.
No Myers Expected
Just a week ago today, an 18-
year-old Northwestern sophomore
quarterback named Tom Myers
tied a school record by complet-
ing 20 passes in 24 attempts, while
leading his team on to an impres-
sive victory. Now in all probability,
no Myers will emerge on the field
here today; nevertheless, Wolver-
ine Coach Bump Elliott has some
mighty capable sophomores among
his troops, and their introduction
at this time would seem very much
in order. For you'll very likely see
a good deal of most of them with-
in the next three years.
One soph you're sure to see (you
can't miss him) is 6'3", 202-lb. Bobj
Timberlake, who appears to be'

i

the post of number one place kick-
er. And, from all indications, his
kickoffs this season should travel
about as far as Bickle's did, which
were generally in the end zone.
He's also demonstrated proficien-
cy at points after touchdown and
field goals.a
Halfback Dick Rindfuss has fig-
ured in Elliott's three-platoon sys-
tem as the man who will be Dave
Raimey's understudy. Originally
noted for his running ability,
Rindfuss has added punting to his
repertoire, and is being counted
upon to spell Joe O'Donnell at that
chore.
He'll Be Back
Elliott had been counting on
Mel Anthony to start at fullback
for the Wolverines this year, but
he sprained an ankle two weeks
ago during a scrimmage, and
probably won't see any action to-
day. But Anthony, a 5'11" 195-lb.
speedster, is very much in the Wol-
verines' plans for the remainder
of the season.
The two outstanding sophomore
linemen are end Jim Conley and
center Jim Green. The 6'3" Conley
is an excellent target, and is sure
to help out in a position where
only one letterman is returning.
Green and junior Bill Muir will al-
ternate at offensive center, left
open by the graduating Todd
Grant.

BOB TIMBERLAKE
... talented soph
Elliott's choice as number two
quarterback behind the veteran
Dave Glinka. Besides his passing
and running ability,nTimberlake
has shown some fine defensive
work this fall; as a result of this,
Elliott has stationed him on the
platoon which specializes in that
department.
Gets His Kicks
But Timberlake's talents don't
end there. Since the departure of
Doug Bickle, he's been elevated to

1~1 .11

Any Experts Around
* Perhaps there is no better time like fall in which P. T. Barnum's
most famous quote comes any closer to being false. For the football
season he should have said "There's a sucker born every 30 seconds."
It would have been closer to the truth.
City Editors who seldom bother much about sports; girls who
think a trap play is something that happens in the spring; and,
worst of all, sports writers who should know better-all turn ex-
perts in the fall.
And for every amateur, semi-pro, or professional picker there is
a comparable number of systems for choosing the winners. Some pick
winners by the names. This is the school of seers which still picks
Notre Dame, Army, Stanford, Holy Cross, Fordham, Oklahoma, and
Michigan to win every game. Others examine psychological aspects
of the game--whether a team will be "up" or "down" for a contest.
Commonly Inaccurate..
These swamis, however different, do have in common a large
amount of guesswork in their selections. As near as these matters
can be determined, it seems that only a scattering few, including the
bookmakers, have an exact system for choosing winners.
One such person is Russell Berg, who plays out of Detroit and
doubles as business manager of the Football News. Besides being an
interesting character who delights in the lighter side of life and en-
joys martinis, he has the disgusting habit of predicting 75 per cent
of football games correctly.
His percentage holds up in the tough Big Ten and Southwest,
two conferences that usually separates the peers from the seers,
although he does admit to having trouble in the Ivy League.
Although Berg jealously guards his formula, a little prying over
lunch brought out some of its features. Basically it involves keeping
close contact with the fortunes of about 300 football teams, recording
the scores each week and adjusting the rating of each team. To start
with he gave each team a rating of 70 and a team moves up or down
according to who they beat or are beaten by and by how many points.
To predict the games, he merely compares the ratings.
Won't Divulge Secret...
Of course the one thing that couldn't be weasled out of him was
what formula he used to adjust the rating of the-teams, not even
after three martinis.
Not to be outdone, I announced that I, too, had -a system for pre-
dicting winners. First I rate their passing offense, rushing offense,
passing defense, and rushing defense. Each team gets a rating of from
1 to 20 in each of the four departments. A change in rating depends
on how much yardage is gained or yielded.
Then I add the offensive ratings of team A and compare
them with the team B's defensive ratings. The same thing is done
for team B's offense. Two points advantage for either team is
equivalent to a one touchdown advantage.
"Well," said Berg, "I've spent about 10,000 hours perfecting my
system and that sounds like a lot more work. And I don't think that
way would be very accurate."
"Oh, that's not all," I answered. "After I find out the margin, I
then add 20 points."
"Why add the 20 points?" he asked.
"And how else," I countered, "could I therefore pick Michigan to
beat Michigan State by a touchdown?"

Husker History
IT'S BEEN A LONG TIME since a Michigan football team has done
battle with Nebraska. The record books say that in 1917 the Wol-
verines won, 22-0. In 1911 the schools played a 6-6 tie and in 1905
Michigan ended up on the long end of the count, 31-0.
Now anyone can tell you that three games aren't much to build
a rivalry on-at least to the heated extent of one such as Michigan-
Michigan State-but I wonder how long Coach Bob Devaney has
been pointing his Cornhusker team at Michigan.
Devaney, if you remember, came to Nebraska last spring from
Wyoming where his teams captured four Skyline Conference titles in
five tries. Under Devaney the Cowboys won 35 games while losing only
10 and playing five ties in five years. But more important, Devaney
is a native of Michigan.
He was born in Saginaw some 46 years ago and played his col-
lege football at Alma, a little school some miles to the north of
here. He served his coaching internship in Michigan high school
circles for 14 years before moving into the big time-at Michigan
State no less. Both Biggie Munn and Duffy Daugherty taught him
well.
At Wyoming, Devaney installed MSU's famous multiple offense
and built a Rocky Mountain grid tradition as strong in its circles as.
Ohio State is in the Big Ten. His goal at Nebraska? To do the same,
and what better way to start than to beat Michigan.
Pride Badgered.. .
NEBRASKA HASN'T HAD.MUCH in the way of football teams late-
ly you know. Their pride was badgered around quite a bit in 1954
when they were named to the Orange Bowl as the Big Eight substi-
tute for Oklahoma despite four losses, to Minnesota, Kansas State,
Pittsburgh, and the killer, 55-7, to Oklahoma. Duke finished the job,
34-7, before a national TV audience on Jan. 1, 1955 and the 'Huskers
had been husked.
Since then only one Nebraska team, the 1955 unit, has been
able to win as many games as it lost and at that they only split
in 10 games. In fact, only three times since 1940 have the Corn-
huskers won more than they've lost-not a statistic likely to make
alumni very happy.
But getting back to the game at hand, Nebraska has two more rea-
sons to want victory this afternoon--assistant coaches Jim Ross and
Mike Corgan. Both of them along with Carl Selmer and John Melton
jumped to Nebraska with Devaney. And both of them are Michigan
boys, Ross from Grosse Isle and a graduate of Eastern Michigan
University, and Corgan from Alma.
Impressive Start...
THE CORNHUSKERS got the jump on Michigan last week, running
around, over, under and through a woefully weak South Dakota
eleven, 53-0. Devaney poured'55 players into the rout in an attempt
to keep the score down. His efforts didn't work.
What this means is anybody's guess. A year ago UCLA roared
into Ann Arbor on top of an impressive opening victory over the Air
Force. They ran out of the Stadium dragging their Bruin behind them.
But no matter which way you look at it, Nebraska's win last
week was an impressive start for a new coach. The Cornhuskers
are supposed to have the material. Lettermen-24 from last fall--
are almost solid through the first two units.
Devaney's got a seasoned backfield in quarterback Dennis Clar-
idge, halfbacks Dennie Stuewe and Willie Ross and fullback Bill
"Thunder" Thornton.
The word is out that Thornton won't play. Dislocated shoulder or
something like that. But remember several years ago when Dean Look
wasn't supposed to play for Michigan State against the Blue. He did
and helped in a rout. Michigan Staters have a knack of doing things
like that. And remember Devaney learned his football up there.

LARRY DONOVAN TYRONE ROBERTSON
...left end . .. left tackle

LLOYD VOSS ROBERT BROWN
... right tackle ... right guard

r-

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