100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 27, 1962 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-09-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WTTT7 W. Q A'V QVTMVWlMUNWlrP Off41"0

1'1

fluwvAX, xY1'r;M1ir;K 7, 1962

z

N EWMAN
CENTER
331 Thompsos

FRIDAY
8:00-
SECOND INITIATION CL
8:30-SQUARE DANCE
Members Free; Others 7
SATU RDAY
After game The Dunkes
8:00-MOVIE:
"Father Brown, The Dete
Starring Alec Guiness
Mister McGoo Cartoon
Members 25c-others 50

LASS
5c

OSU, MSU To

Head Big Ten

CANHAM EXPLAINS:

AAU's

Power Wanes

Q

(EDITOR'S NOTE: This is the first
in a two part series on how the Big
Ten Conference stacks up for the
coming season.)
BY JOHN SCOCHIN

i
i

It's last year all over again: in
the Big Ten at least. Despite aj
Hour fresh new season and an added
cast of characters the power-,
houses of old, Ohio State and
ctive' Michigan State are again takingy
possessive glances at that Big TenJ
grid crown.
Both the Buckeyes and the,
Spartans have a strong nucleus
C left over from last year's power-;
houses,vtogether with enough tal-
ent in the right places to rate a
notch above the most likely pur-
suers; Purdue, Iowa, Northwest-
ern and Minnesota.
Bob Ferguson, the greatest of
the many great Ohio State full-
backs, is gone but Coach Woody
Hayes has once again come up with
a quartet of backs to supply the
irresistable force of another Buck-

five yards per carry last year in
30 attempts as a fill-in for All-
America Ferguson.
In Paul Warfield and Bob Klein
the Buckeyes have an unbeatable
halfback combination. Warfield is
a touted pre-season All-America,
who scooted 420 yards last year in
77 carries and ravaged Michigan
with his breakaway sprints in the
final game of the season.
The Buckeye offensive line is

once again big, veteran, and mo-
bile. Only at left end where Chuck
Bryant excelled will the Buckeyes
field a new face. Five starters
from the defensive lineup picked
up their sheepskins, however, All-
America Mike Ingram among
them. The replacements will come
from a host of veterans and the
cream of a Buckeye freshman
team rated one of the nation's
best.

--, ti
.+,.
:
Z
.,.

For Your Walkin
Pleasure
Slim, Trim

S EBAGOMOc
" HAND-SEWN THROAT

eye running attack.
In the old Tom Matte tradition,
another fine runner will be calling
the signals for the Columbus crew.
John Mummey, a former high
school All-America at fullback, re-
turns to handle the quarterback-
ing duties together with his 5.7
yard rushing average.
At the key role of fullback will
be Dave Katterhenrick, a bruis-,
ing 210-pounder who can plowi
through a line with the best off
them. The 6'1" senior averaged
Staffers Wanted
Are you a sports enthusiast?
If so, The Daily offers you the
interest with a bit of writing.
opportunity of combining your
No experience is required. Con-
tact either Jan Winkleman or
Tom Webber at The Daily of-
floe, 420 Maynard St., second
floor.

qualifications of a title contender.
The whole 13-man Purdue back-
field is back with halfback Tom
Bloom, a 6.2 yards per carry rush-
er, speedy Dave Miller and 213-lb.
fullback Roy Walker slated for
heavy duty.
The Boilermakers lost five key
linemen but center Don Paltani,
end Forest Farmer, and All-Amer-
ica candidate Don Brumm, a 6'3"
218-lb. tackle, are the concrete
foundation of another staunch de-
fense.
Injury ruined Iowa last year, but
a healthy Hawkeye aggregation
will be back in the thick of the
title struggle in 1962.
Quarterback Matt Szykowny,
who threw for over 1,000 yards last
season, is back to lead the Hawk-
eye attack. Halfback Larry Fer-
guson, recovered from a knee in-
jury after gaining consensus All-
America honors in 1960, is a strong
breakaway threat. Fullback Joe
Williams, who filled in for Fer-
guson as a halfback last season
and scored nine touchdowns, is
back at his old position.
Sammie Harris and Paul Krause
have also returned for halfback
duties. Harris, with his great speed
was the team's top pass receiver
while Krause averaged 4.7 yards
on the ground. Sophomore Willie
Smith, a 6', 180-pounder, who
runs the 100 in 9.6, is a newcomer
who bears watching.
The Hawkeye line, however, was
weakened by the loss of three in-
terior linemen who received All-
America mention, and adequate
replacements must be found before
Iowa can emerge as a top rated
contender.
Major League
Standings
AMERICAN LEAGUE
W L Pct. GB
x-New York 94 65 .591 -
Minnesota 88 71 .553 6
Los Angeles 85 73 .538 82.
Chicago 84 75 .528 10
Detroit 82 76 .519 111
Cleveland 77 81 .487 1612
Baltimore 77 82 .484 17
Boston 75 83 .475 18%
Kansas City 72 87 .453 22
Washington 59 100 .371 35
x-Clinched pennant.
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
New York 9, Washington 5
Chicago 9, Boston 3
Los Angeles 8, Detroit 3
Baltimore 3-2, Kansas City 0-6 (t-n)
(Only games Scheduled)
TODAY'S GAMES
No games scheduled
NATIONAL LEAGUE
W L Pct. GB
Los Angeles 100 57 .637 -
SancFrancisco 99 59 .627 1
Cincinnati 96 63 .604 5
Pittsburgh 91 68 .575 9
Milwaukee 84 74 .532 16
St. Louis 80 78 .506 20
Philadelphia 80 78 .506 20
Houston 62 93 .400 37
Chicago 57 101 .361 43
New York A 39 118 .248 60
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
San Francisco 6, St. Louis 3
Philadelphia 6, Chicago 5
Pittsburgh 1, Cincinnati "0
jMilwaukee 6, New York 3
Houston at Los Angeles (nc.)
TODAY'S GAMES
Philadelphia at Chicago
St. Louis at San Francisco
Houston at Los Angeles
(Only games scheduled)

By DAVE GOOD
On paper, the U. S. Track and
Field Federation and its backers-
including all competitors in high
schools, junior colleges and uni-
versities-are outlaws in the eyes
of the world.
But according to Don Canham,
Michigan track coach and one of
the organizers of the Federation,
the rebel group holds the upper
hand in its power struggle with
the Amateur Athletic Union, still
the official representative of track
and field here.
The AAU can blacklist USTFF
competitors from any internation-
al competition, including t h e
Olympic Games, with the backing
last week of what Canham calls
a routine decision of the parent
body of all sports, the Internation-
al Amateur Athletic Federation.
Scratch Everybody
"Let them (the AAU) make
everybody in the country ineligi-
ble," Canham urged. "That's about
what they're going to have to do,'
and it's fine with us. The more
men they declare ineligible, the
less power they have."
Canham returned last week
from the IAAF's 23rd congress in
Belgrade, Yugoslavia, where dele-
gates confirmed "full and unanim-
ous confidence and support" of
the AAU and resolved "that ath-
letes of no member of the IAAF
be permitted to compete in the
U. S. except in open meets con-
ducted or sanctioned by the
Amateur Athletic Union of the
United States."
Canham says this is just so
much hogwash.

A FACE IN THE CROWD - The big man with the little baseball
cap and the wavy arms coaches football for a living. He's pretty
good at it too, for his Ohio State Buckeyes, defending Conference
titlists, are once again the top contenders for the grid crown.
Woody Hayes is his name. Remember it!

Despite IAAF Ruling,

Sound and Fury
"There was nothing

to it,

A>

#1902-COFFEE BROWN
(Shadow-antiqued))
#1972-SMOOTH BLACK

GRID SELECTIONS

I

sizes to 13

New easy-going slip-on that takes you everywhere in smart style,
deep-down comfort. Compares favorably with shoes selling
for much, much more. Unique hand-sewn throat gives the effect
of a completely hand-sewn shoe. Coffee Brown is shadow-antiqued
to point up low sweep of line. Mellow-rich leathers.
Friendly-fitting. Snug heel.a.
Try a pair ... TODAYI

Are you one of those who predicted a Liston knockout in 2:06 of
the first round? If so, the Daily offers you a brand new battlefield
to test the sharpness of your mental prowess. You are being chal-
lenged to another match, one that will prove that you are really the
mental whiz you and everyone else thinks you are, or that you are
simply a flash-in-the-pan fluke who was flattened when the pres-
sure was' on.
All you have to do to prove your wizardry once and for all is to
stop in at The Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard St., and pick up your
official Grid Picks entry blank. Winners are showered in glory and
in fabulous prizes. They will be walking so tall that they'll have to
bend underneath the doorway of the Michigan Theatre with their
free tickets. In case of ties, the winner is the one with the closest
prediction of the Michigan-Nebraska game score. Good luck, it's a.
prerequisite to winning.
THIS WEEK'S GAMES

There are still huge linemen
and swift backs this year at Michi-
gan State, only not as many of
them. The Spartans lost 14 reg-
ulars from their starting offensive
and defensive teams but with cer-
tified stars like Dave Behrman,
Jim Bobbitt, Ed Budde, Matt Snor-
ton and Ernie Clark in the line to-
gether with George Saimes, Sher-
man Lewis, Dewey Lincoln and
Pete Smith in the backfield, Coach
Duffy Daugherty is more than op-
timistic.
Behrman, a 250-lb. All-America
at tackle last year, anchors an im-
posing line at center. Bobbitt and
Budde at 247 and 243 are a quar-
ter ton of trouble at the tackle
slots, while Clark and Snorton as
defensive ends are among the Big
Ten's best.
Fleet fullback Saimes, the team
captain, was last year's backfield
hero and a pre-season All-Amer-
ica this fall. Lewis and Lincoln,
true breakaway threats, followed'
right behind Saimes in the Spar-
tan rushing statistics, and quarter-
back Smith who directed the Spar-
tan machine as a sophomore is
back with a year's experience.
Sophomore star Ron DiGravio
is back as a junior to direct a
Purdue team which has all the

FILECCIA BROTHERS
1109 South University In South Campus Village

really," he explained. "They up-
held their previous ruling that
visiting athletes must compete
under the group in control of the
sport in a country-and right now
that's the AAU.
"As for American athletes, this
is a domestic squabble and the
IAAF has no say over what hap-
pens here."
Canham was emphatic in his
criticism of Col. Don Hull, execu-
tive director of the AAU, who re-
ported to newsmen that the con-
vention had refused to admit
Canham, Purdue Coach Dave
Rankin and former Penn State
Coach Chick Werner (who resign-
ed to take over as executive direc-
tor of the USTFF).
Twists Facts
"Mr. Hull simply lied when he
said that we were refused admis-
sion to the council," pointed out
Canham. "At no time did we ap-
ply for admission, although we
may well have been refused if we
had applied.
"If we were going to send some-
body to the council we wouldn't
send coaches. We went and were
very successful talking to indi-
viduals. We talked to plenty of
delegates at dinners and we're in
better shape now than we ever
have been, actually,"
Canham added, however, that
as matters now stand, the AAU
seal of disapproval can prevent
U. S. runners, jumpers and throw-
ers from competing in foreign
meets, but there is nothing to
keep the outlaws from boycotting
AAU meets at home in favor of
the Federation.
Four Opposing Meets
And this is just what is sched-
uled to happen. The Federation
has already set four meets in di-
rect opposition to the correspond-

ing AAU meets: cross country,
Nov. 22; men's indoor, Feb. 23;
women's indoor, March 8 or 9;
men's outdoor, June 21-22.
Canham has insisted since last
September, when a poll of college
coaches revealed over 90 per cent
in favor of a new organization,
that the AAU has no legs to stand
on.
"We (the USTFF) have all the
athletes, the coaches and the fa-
cilities. It's like somebody trying
to tell General Motors how to
make cars," he commented.
NCAA Has Say
Canham surmised that the over-
whelming majority of track and
field stars would compete in the
Federation meets, since the Na-
tional Collegiate Athletic Associa-
tion, the major stockholder in the
USTFF, will prevent its athletes
from going to the AAU meets.
"There aren't any Articles of
Alliance between the two any
more," Canham explained. "They
just can't compete for the AAU."
Support at the AAU meets will
likely come from the Armed
Forces, which Canham says are
not at liberty to join the Federa-
tion, and from neutral indepen
dents, which don't want to risk
going with the new group.
Neutrals Have Choice
"I don't know which way Hayes
Jones and some of those others
are going to go," commented Can-
ham. "Of course if they're really
neutral they won't compete in
either meet."
As the USTFF is set up now,
voting delegates represent the
NCAA, high schools (which voted
35 to 2 this summer to join), jun-
ior colleges and national competi-
tive groups, the National Track
and Field Association, allied non-
competitive groups, and the Armed
Forces (if they join).
The stage was set last year for
a possible all-sport movement
away from the AAU. Coaches in
wrestling, basketball, judo, gym-
nastics and swimming have also
expressed dissatisfaction with the
AAU and have been meeting to-
gether.
But the USTFF is the pioneer
organization. "I guess the cross
country meet will be the first
showdown," Canham predicted.
"Then when the time comes we
petition the IAAF for recognition.
We've got 90 per cent of the ath-
letes right now. All we need is the
other 10 per cent."
Platoons
Anyone?
Elliott's eleven is primed and
eager for the Nebraska opener
Saturday, but it would hate to
suffer the indignity of being name-
less! (They) beg you to join
the Name the Platoons Contest
and provide the first stringers, the
second string offense, and the de-
fensive squad with descriptive
names by Friday night.
Entries may be turned in at
the sports desk. To the fortunate
fellow or clever coed who creates
the winning name will go a pair
of free passes to the Michigan
Theatre. Remember, Friday night
is the deadline for the contest.
Winners will be announced next
week.

L

;-m

iu

""'" ""

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

Nebraska at MICH. (score)
Indiana at Cincinnati
Missouri at Minnesota
North Carolina at Ohio State
Oregon State at Iowa
New Mexico St. at Wisconsin
Michigan State at Stanford
Illinois at Washington
Syracuse vs. Army at New York
Colgate at Cornell

11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.

Rutgers at Princeton
Boston College at Villanova
Tennessee at Auburn
Georgia Tech at Florida
Notre Dame at Oklahoma
Utah at Oregon
Georgia at Vanderbilt
Rice at Louisiana State
Pittsburgh at Baylor
Tex. Christian at Miami (Fla)

ENJOY LIFE
with
MILLER HIGH LIFE
SAME GOOD TASTE EVERYWHERE!

DAVE HORNING WELCOMES YOU TO CHECKMATE

1F 'I

K4

w e6

SPORT COATS
$35
Comparable 'Value $45
DRESS SLACKS
18.95 to 17.95
Just arrived in time for Fraternity
Rush. A choice collection of
new fall sport coats. See these new
arrivals in tweeds, checks, stripes, and
solids. Our slack selection couldn't
be better. Color coordinated in
continental and ivy styles.

I

i
s

XI
i..

'F
_{

:
- : i::
.;; :
:;.:.;.
':,3,:.:
{y { : :: :::
?:;
. .: =:
:< :::
... ''.f ._ i .

A,.
(1^...j

t
*.

Y

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan