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September 20, 1962 - Image 7

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-09-20

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SEPTEMBER 20,1962

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SEPTMBE 20 196 - HE ICHIAN AIL

WINKS THINKS
By Jan Winkelman

Rugby Anyone?
ALL RIGHT, fans. Which of the following words does NOT belong:
Football, Baseball, Rugby, Basketball
Anyone, even an unsophisticated college coed, will inform you
that, somehow, Rugby does not belong. Through long and painful ex-
perience at taking college entrance exams the word "Rugby" fairly
leaps out of the paper at the reader and he promptly acknowledges
the correct response. Let us now examine briefly the rationale behind
the choice.
Football, baseball, and basketball are the three big collegiate
sports in this country. Undoubtedly, these three dominate the pro-
fessional sport scene and unquestionably, they are the nucleus of
spectator interest during the year.
Babe Ruth, Ty Cobb, Connie Mack, and the era of great sports-
writers in the Twenties were responsible for baseball's becoming firmly
entrenched as the national pastime. Football caught on originally,
owing to the pure sadistic pleasure that participants and spectators
alike derived from the mauling, bruising tactics used at the time
of the game's introduction. At that time fans greedily congregated to
observe the victorious onslaughts before the fearsome flying wedge.
Basketball owes its popularity to the rapidity of the game and
also to the fact that basketball is the only purely American invention.
Unlike baseball and football, basketball was originated and popular-
ized in the United States. Baseball is an adaptation from the Scottish
game of cricket; football, oddly enough, stems from rugby.
This brings us back to our original topic: rugby. You ask, "What
is Rugby?"
FUNDAMENTALLY, rugby is a gigantic free-for-all, which continues
without interruption until one of the two 40-minute halves of
the "match" have elapsed. There are no time-outs or substitutions
for the 30 men on the field.
The object of the game is to force the ball over the goal line or
through the uprights of the goalpost of one's opponents. Unlike Amer-
ican football, the forward pass is non-existent. Therefore, the ball
is moved by lateralling diagonally or by kicking the ball to one's
teammates. In addition to the three point "try" which is roughly
equivalent to a touchdown, there is the all-important "conversion."
Most American sports fans are unaware of the large following
of the game here in the United States. Both on the West Coast
and among the Ivy League colleges, the game ranks in popularity
with football.
Here at Michigan Rugby has unlimited opportunities. The Wol-
verine Rugby Club is composed of many outstanding varsity rugby
players from top schools in the East, and from such diverse places
as New Zealand. John Appleford, Chuck Dayton, Whata Whiniata,
Michael Burroughs, and Tom Dalglish are only a few of the outstand-
ing men on this year's squad.
Besides competing at Wines Field immediately following all home
football games, the Wolverine Ruggers take on opponents in Toronto
and may possibly schedule "fixtures" with a few Big Ten schools
or Notre Dame.
YOU MAY still think that "Rugby" was odd-man in the little quiz
at the outset of this column. Notwithstanding the physical contact
in Rugby, which goes beyond that of football (or even basketball,
the way it is played here), you may still contend that "Rugby" was
obviously the exception.
Despite the fact that basketball and football generically derive
directly from Rugby, you may persist in your argument.
But if you have had any experience with college boards or law
aptitudes, you will, I think, reserve your judgment until you see
Rugby for yourself. Not only is the least obvious answer usually cor-
rect: you haven't LIVED 'till you've seen Rugby.

U.S. AMATEUR GOLF:
Newcomb Enters
Fifth Round Today
PINEHURST, N.C. VP) - The
champions came tumbling down extra hole for a fourth-round
in the sandhills of North Carolina tory over Walter Beckjord of
yesterday as a bundle of upsets cinnati.
struck the fourth round of the It'll be a young man's tou:
62nd U.S. Amateur Golf Tourna- ment, filled with collegians
ment and shoved former kings competition resumes today -
Deane Beman, Harvie Ward and the 18-hole fifth round. That
Dick Chapman and British champ be followed by the 18-hole q
Dick Davies to the sidelines. ter-finals this afternoon wl

I-M Needs You
If you are interested in ref-
ereeing Intramural f o o t b a 11
games for fun and profit this
fall,econtact I-M Director Earl
Riskey any time at the I-M
Bldg.
One of the surprise survivors is
22-year-old Bill Newcomb of Roy-
al Center, Ind., golf captain at
Michigan last year when he helped
the Wolverines along to a third-
place finish in the Big Ten.
Newcomb had an easy morning
match yesterday with young Mike
Dore of Chatham Township, N.J.,
but needed a birdie on the third

I

WHAT GIVES HERE?
(See related column to left)

----- -^

MEET SUNDAY:
Join DAILY
Sports Staff
A meeting of all students in-
terested in working on the Michi-
gan Daily Sports Staff will be
held Sunday afternoon at 5:00
p.m. on the second floor of the
Student Publications Building, 420
Maynard Street.
The meeting will be brief and is
open to all students who have in-
terest, experience is not required.
Sports staffers have ranged
from pre-med. students to history
and political sciencemajors. Do
not feel you will be hampered by
lack of training or vocational ob-
jective in journalism. We will train
you to write.
Advantages in working with the
sports staff are that you can per-
sonally meet varsity athletes and
coaches. You will have signed ar-
ticles in print within weeks.
As a member of the sports staff
you can receive passes to key
athletic contests. You are also ac-
corded the privilege of watching
news come in to us directly over
the Associated Press teletype.
The meeting Sunday will be
brief. If you cannot attend, you
may contact Jan Winkelman or
any other member of the Sports
Staff at NO 2-3241.

NAME THE PLATOONS
You need guess no longer about what you win if you win our
"Name the Platoons" contest for Michigan's football team.
You win all the ignominy and shame that goes with the recogni-
tion that you are the jerk who named the starting team THE PURPLE
PORPOISES or the offensive specialists the DEEP SIX'ERS.
And just by way of conversation, the winner of each division will
receive three free passes to the Michigan Theater, now showing Harold
Lloyd's "World of Comedy."
Enter as many times as you like and send your names by mid-
night a week from tomorrow to The Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard,
Ann Arbor.
And don't forget, if you win you have to help us patrol the
stands and throw out everybody who refuses to call the squads by the
winning names.

_'

0E

Major League
StandingS
AMERICAN LEAGUE
W L Pct. GB
New York 91 63 .591 -
Minnesota 87 67 .565 4
Los Angeles 83 70 .542 71/
Chicago 80 73 .523'10Y/2
Detroit 78 74 .513 12
Baltimore 74 79 .484 1632
Boston 73 80 .477 17/
Cleveland 73 80 .477 172
Kansas City 69 83 .454 21
Washington 58. 97 ,374 33;
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Minnesota 12, Detroit 5
New York 8, Washington 5
Chicago 3, Boston 2
Cleveland 10, Kansas City 9
Los Angeles 9, Baltimore 4
TODAY'S GAMES
Detroit at Minnesota
Boston at Chicago
Cleveland at Kansas City
(Only games scheduled)
NATIONAL LEAGUE
WV L Pct. GB

10th Death
In Football
JACKSONVILLE () - A brain
hemorrhage caused the death of
a high school football player on
the practice field, the county med-
ical examiner reported yesterday
after an autopsy.
Benjamin Brown Jr., 16-year-old
Negro, dropped dead a few min-
utes after he hit a tackling dum-
my in practice at Douglas Ander-
son High School's practice field
Tuesday.
His death is the tenth reported
in high school and college football
this season.
Detective Sgt. K. O. Helsabeck,
said the hemorrhage apparently
was caused by a blow on the head
when Brown hit the dummy.
The detective said Brown, al-
though wearing a helmet and full
pads, must have hit the tackling
dummy with the side of his face
with enough force and just at the
angle to cause the hemorrhage.

I

Want to S-T-mR-EmT- Cv-H
Your Dollars?
e .. 4 O . - t21 ll "O R E THAN 12 OUES
Z3 NO FINER _
BEER z
AT ANY PRICE

JJJ
.JJ.i "
'J,'y
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DAVE HORNING WELCOMES YOU TO CHECKMATI

Los Angeles
San Francisco
Cincinnati
Pittsburgh
Milwaukee
St. Louis
Philadelphia
Houston
Chicago
New York

99 54
95 57
94 60
89 63
80 74
77 75
76 76
58 91
55 97
37 113

.647 --
.625 3112
.610 5
.586 9%,
.519 19%
.507 211/
.500 221/
.389 39
.362 432
.247 602

YESTERDAY'S RESULTSj
Los Angeles 4, Milwaukee 0
San Francisco 7, St. Louis 4
Pittsburgh 1, Cincinnati 0
Philadelphia 4, Chicago 3 (called 6th
inning; second game ppd., rain)
Houston at New York (ppd., rain)
TODAY'S GAMES
San Francisco at St. Louis (n)
Cincinnati at Pittsburgh (n)
Chicago at Philadelphia (n)
Houston at New York (2)
(Only games scheduled)

COEDS:
It's Hairstyling
Galore !
" No Appointment Needed
" Air-Conditioned
The Dascola Barbers
Near Michigan Theatre

r

OPEN MONDAY UNTIL 8:30 P.M.
7fZ

I

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Handsome

Check mate
Sweater
Pullover and
Cardigan Styles
Look better in a sweater, especially in
our new collection of bold, bulky
beauties. Slip into our knit hits in
cardigans and pullovers in rich
autumn colorings-nubby or smooth
weaves, plain or patterned.

~1 /

The three-piece suit
a comprehensive fall collection
now available in our University Shop
The vested suit that young men favor is now avail-
able in a very full range of fabrics and colors to
demonstrate its excellent aptitudes for campus or
business life. Included in our fine woolen collections
are tweeds, worsteds, sharkskins and flannels in

10O95

,o 19 95

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