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September 19, 1962 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-09-19

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 19,4962

THE MICHIGAN DAILY WEDNESDAY. SEPTEMBER 19, 196~

'M' Has Depth at Center

SERIES TIED, 1-1:
Gretel Surprises Weatherly

I-

Major League Standings

I

AMERICAN LEAGUE

NATIONAL LEAGUE

T

By PETE DI LORENZI

The Michigan football team
worked on polishing up its offense
yesterday and welcomed center
Bill Green back to the fold.
The Trenton sophomore's return
from a bruised hip bolstered coach
Bump Elliott's youthful center
corps to five-man strength. In ad-.
dition to Green, Elliott has juniors
Bill Muir and Don Blanchard,
senior Lou Pavloff, and another
soph, Brian Patchen.
Cheerleading Tryouts
The cheerleaders will prac-
tice today in the big gym of
the I-M building at four o'clock.
All interested in cheerleading
should come at this time for"
try-outs.
Presently, Muir is working with
the first team, the two-way team;
Blanchard is with the second, or
offensive, unit; and Green and
Patchen are alternating on the
Raiders, or defensive team. Line
Coach Bob Hollway revealed that
Pavloff is being groomed as a de-
fensive specialist at a linebacker's
post.
Lack Experience.

NEWPORT, R. I. (P-A crew
of irate Australians, stung by
Yankee taunts, drove challenger
Gretel to a dramatic 300-yd. vic-
tory over defender Weatherly yes-
terday and knotted the famed
America's Cup yacht racing series
at one race each.
Despite their surprise triumph,
the Australians again exercised
their privilege of asking for a
day's delay and so the third race
now is scheduled for tomorrow,
weather permitting.
47 Seconds
Yesterday's defeat, by 47 sec-
onds, was a stunning blow to the
confident Americans, beaten for
the first time in a race since
T.O.M. Sopwith's, Endeavor of
England won the first two races
against Harold Vanderbilt's Rain-
bow before losing the next four
races in a row back in 1934.
The Americans never have lost
an America's Cup series in this
world series of yachting which was
begun in 1851. Prior to today, the
defenders had beaten back 13
challengers in succession. I
The surprising Gretel, counted
out and ridiculed after losing Sa-
turday's opening race by 3 min-
utes, 46 seconds, got the jump on
Weatherly at the start, led briefly
and stayed near the defender's
stern most of the first two legs
before taking charge at the final

mark of the 24-mile triangular
race.
Spinnaker Billowing
The sleek, white-hulled Aus-
tralian challenger, her white spin-
naker billowing, crossed the finish
Sports Writers!
Are you a frustrated jock? A
lover of sports with no ability.
If so, The Michigan Daily sports
staff is what you've been
searching for. Here, you can in-
terview players and coaches;
write stories on college and pro-
fessional athletes, and display
your vast knowledge of the won-
derful world of sports to a cam-
pus audience of 25,000.
If you are interested in join-
ing, come down to The Daily
(420 Maynard St.) and talk to
either Tom Webber or Jan Win-
kelman or better yet, attend a
meeting here Sunday afternoon
at 5 p.m.
line in 2 hours, 46 minutes, 58
seconds. Weatherly's time was
2:47:45.
All of this victory margin was
built up on the final, downwind
leg of eight miles. In fact, Gretfl
was trailing by 14 seconds as the
turn for home was made.
But here the fates of racing

THIRD OF SEASON:
Texas Gridder Dies

.4

DALLAS (IP)-Reggie Grob, 19,
sophomore guard on the Univer-
sity of Texas football squad, died
yesterday as the result of compli-
cations from a heat stroke suf-
fered on the opening day of prac-
tice.
His was the third football death
in Texas this season and the sec-
ond in Southwest Conference his-
tory. Mike Kelsey, Southern Meth-
odist University center, died from
a heat stroke the day after fall
piactice opened Sept. 1.
During Workout
A high school boy, 16-year-old
Raul Rodriguez, died Aug. 31 after
collapsing during a workout at
Del Rio.
Grob, who was in Brackenridge
Hospital at Auistin for 17 days,
was flown here Monday and taken
to Parkland Hospital where a
three-hour operation was perform-
ed Monday night. He died at 3
p.m. without regaining conscious-,
ness.
Doctors at Austin said the boy,
who lived at Spring Branch, Tex.,
apparently had recovered from the
heat stroke when kidney complica-
tions arose.
When he was brought here Mon-
day in a plane owned by John
Holmes, member of the Univer-
sity of Texas Athletic Council, he
was reported suffering from pro-
gressive liver failure, kidney fail-
ure and-bleeding complications.
Before Opening
Grob died only four days before
the opening of the football season
in the Southwest Conference -
when he could have played his first
varsity game. Texas opens the sea-
son Saturday night against Ore-
gon at Austin.
I-M Meeting
To Be Held
Athletic representatives from all
residence halls, social fraternities,
professional fraternities and in-
dependents will meet with the In-
tramural Department tonight to
make final plans for the I-M foot-
ball season.
The residence hall representa-
tives will meet at South Quad at
7:30 p.m. while the latter three
groups will meet at the Intramural
building at 7:30.

Kelsey, a 20-year old, 200-1b.,
junior from Corpus Christi, died1
in Baylor Hospital here without
regaining consciousness followingl
his collapse the day before as;
Southern Methodist started fallc
training. His temperature shot to
110 degrees and death was attrib-
uted to a heat stroke although thel
football practice was conducted in
77-degree weather. The tempera-
ture was 95 degrees at Austin when
Grob suffered his stroke.
AAU Given
More Help
B yIAAF
BELGRADE (P)-The Amateur
Athletic Union yesterday had the'
backing of the International Ama-
teur Athletic Federation in its dis-
pute with the NCAA-and as an
added bonus headed for home with
the auhtorization to investigate
American college athletic scholar-
ship programs.
The IAAF, world governing body
of track and field, Monday barred
athletes of all member federations
from participating in any Ameri-
can track meet not authorized by
the United States AAU.
The AAU and the NCAA, repre-
senting the colleges, have been in-
volved in a controversy over which
organization should control track
and field in the United States.
The NCAA, unhappy with AAU
directions, backed the formation of
a new group-the U.S. Track and
Field Federation which already has
scheduled two national meets on
the same dates as AAU champion-
ships next year.
Folklore Society
Folk Sing and Meeting
Tomorrow 8 p.m.
On the Mall between
the League and Hill Aud.
or in the Union
depending on the weather

"Our centers this year lack the
experience of our centers of re-
cent years such as Jerry Smith,
Todd Grant, and John Walker, but
we feel that they have as much
potential ability. Muir and Blan-
chard saw little action as reserves
last year, and Green and Patchen
are sophomores. Pavloff is the
only one of the group with game
experience and that was two years
with the Raiders," Hollway ex-
plained.
Original Raider
Pavloff has been out the past
two seasons with knee injuries.
He is the only member of the
present squad to have played on
the original Raiders.
Blanchard, who has been im-
pressive for the past week, is the
heaviest of the five, weighing 235;
he is 6'3". Green is 6'1", 210; Muir,
6', 210; Patchen, 5'11", 210; and
Pavloff, 6', 210.
Hollway eels that Green has
the best all-around potential of
the group. "He is very strong on
defense now, and, although he
has never played in a varsity game
and has missed a week's practice,
we think he has the tools to be-
come an outstanding two-way cen-
ter.
Offensive Ability
Meanwhile, Muir and Blanchard
have demonstrated exceptional of-
fensive ability and will probably
be used in that capacity, while
Patchen will be given a shot on
the defense.
"What we'll probably end up
doing is have offensive and defen-
sive centers enter with each unit,"
said Hollway.

.NAME THE PLATOONS
You thought we were kidding last week, didn't you?
But The Daily really is sponsoring a "Name the Platoon" contest
for Michigan's football team (it's too late to back down once some-
thing hits print), and we're willing to patrol the stands and
throw out anybody we catch calling the first and second strings
by the wrong names.
The defensive team has to be named the Raiders because of
a precedent set three years ago, but this is the first season head
coach Bump Elliott has thought about using. the three-platoon
system. Unless he changes his mind, the starters and the offensive
specialists will still need names.
Now, assuming that nobody on the football team is imaginative
enough to think up two more names as catchy as the Raiders, we
have decided to throw Daily readers into the act.
Just think up names (printable, please) suitable for the starting
unit and the offensive squad and either mail a postcard or send a
special messenger to The Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard, Ann Arbor,
by midnight a week from Friday (before the Nebraska game).
The Daily's sports staff will judge the entries and (we hope) will
supply some free passes to a local theater for the winner in each
division. You can enter as many times as you like for each unit.
The only catch is that we may make you help us patrol the stands.
If you can't think of any good names and still want to enter, you
may clip this article and encircle your favorites out of the following
names:
THE BLUE VARMINTS, THE MINOTAURS, THE SPARTANS,
THE CRETANS, THE DRUIDS, THE ICERS, THE MATMEN, THE
HOSSES, THE GOLDEN ANTEATERS, THE SARACENS, THE
GUARDIANS, THE GARDENERS, THE GALLOPING GARDENIAS,
THE TEARDROPS, THE PLATTERS, THE GHASTLY GONDO-
LEERS, THE VAMPIRES, THE BUMBLINB BUMBLEBEES, THE
TUMBLING TUMBLEWEEDS, THE BOLLWEEVILS, THE CHEE-
TAHS, THE VANILLA VIKINGS.

and a daring maneuver b Jack
Sturrock, skipper of the Gretel,
paid off handsomely. Trailing th
defender, Gretel swung wide
around the mark and hoisted her
white spinnaker in 10 seconds.'
That cut off some of Weatherly's
breeze and the Americans, in their
haste to get away from such a po-
sition, were slow in dropping their
jib.
This fouled Weatherly's big red
spinnaker, which lost its wind and
dropped into the water. Before
Emil (Bus) M o s b a c h e r, Jr.,
Weatherly's skipper, could rectify
the-situation he had lost 40 sec-
onds and Gretel was out in front.
Harvard
leer Ruled
Ineligible
CAMBRIDGE, Mass. (AP) - The
possibility of a break between the
Ivy League and the Eastern Col-
legiate Athletic Association arose
yesterday when the latter ruled
Harvard hockey player Gene Kin-
asewich ineligible.
The ECAC's eligibility commit-
tee made its ruling on Kinasewich,
the Edmonton, Alta., native, Mon-
day.
A year ago the deans compris-
ing the Ivy League Eligibility Com-
mittee made an exception of Kin-
asewich's case on the grounds of
unusual circumstances and gave
him the green light for competi-
tion after keeping him ineligible
his freshman year.
The ECAC ruling came as a blow
to Ivy circles in general as well as
to Harvard where an appeal is ex-
pected to be considered at the
next meeting of the Harvard Fac-
ulty Committee on Athletic Sports
Oct. 1.
The Ivy schools have agreed in-
dividually to be members of and
abide by the ECAC. But there is
a growing question now whether
Ivy League deans, having made a
decision on careful study, want any
part of an outside group monitor-
ing or overruling those decisions.
ATTENTION STUDENTS-
BOOKS FOR SALE
order your current text books, ref-
erence books; etc., from a wholesale
house direct. Hard cover or paper
back. New or slightly used. The
largest selection in the market on
all subjects. Catalog sent on request.
Send 25c coin or stamps for
handling and postage. (Deduct from
first order). Prompt service. Midwest
Book Center, 7635 N. Paulina St.,
Chicago 26, Illinois.

New York
Minnesota
x-Los Angeles
Chicago
Detroit
x-Baltimore
Boston
Cleveland
Kansas City
Washington

W
90
86
82
79
78
73
73
72
69
58

x-Aa~yi oncoast.YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS Chicago 4, St. Louis 3
Detroit 2, Minnesota 1 Milwaukee 10, Los Angeles 5
New York 7, Washingto ni Cincinnati 7, Pittsburgh 4 (10 Inn.)
Kansas City 6, Cleveland 1 Houston 6-8, New York 2-6 (twi-night)
Boston 10, Chicago 5 Only games scheduled
TODAY'S GAMES TODAY'S GAMES
New York at Washington Los Angeles at Milwaukee
Detroit at Minnesota San Francisco at St. Louis
Baltimore at Los Angeles Cincinnati at Pittsburgh
Boston at Chicago Chicago at Philadelphia
Cleveland at Kansas City Houston at New York

11

1

CWACAT

SHIRTS
30 DIFFERENT STYLES
and COLORS
SIZES FOR ALL
STILLo S3.Fr ONLY
The Shop to Stop For All Good Sports
oe Sf7ort S4o/~*

L
63
67
69
73
73
78
79
80
82
96

Pet.
.588
.562
.543
.520
.519
.483
.480
.474
.451
.377

GB
4
7
10'.
11
16
16;
17 r
20
32%

Los Angeles
San Francisco
Cincinnati
Pittsburgh
Milwaukee
St. Louis
Philadelphia
Houston
Chicago
New York

W L
98 54
94 57
94 59
88 63
86 73
77 74
75 76
58 91
55 96
37 113

Pct. GB
.645 -
.623 34
.614 412
.583 912
.523 1812
.510 3201-
.497 22',
.389 38
.364 421
.247 60

711 N. University

902 S. State

a U

I

Olt
.< (Author of "I Was a Teen-age Dwarf," "The Many
Loves of Dobie Gillis," etc.)

I

. - - !

Seniors
There

und

Cmads

ANOTHER -YEAR, ANOTHER DOLLAR
With today's entry I begin my ninth year of writing columns
in your school newspaper for the makers of Marlboro (igarettes.
Nine years, I believe you will agree, is a long time. In fact,
It took only a little longer than nine years to dig the &ies
Canal, and you know what a gigantic undertaking that was!
To be sure, the work would have gone more rapidly had the
shovel been invented at that time, but, as we all know, the
shovel was not invented until 1946 by Walter R. Shovel of
Cleveland, Ohio. Before Mr. Shovel's discovery in 1946, all
digging was done with sugar tongs-a method unquestionably
dainty but hardly what one would call rapid. There were, natu-
rally, many efforts made to speed up digging before Mr. Shovel'8
breakthrough-notably an attempt in 1912 by the immortal
Thomas Alva Edison to dig with the phonograph, but the only
thing that happened was that he got his horn full of sand. This
so depressed Mr. Edison that he fell into a fit of melancholy
from which he did not emerge until two years later when his
friend William Wordsworth, the eminent nature poet, cheered
him up by imitating a duck for four and a half hours.
But I digress. For nine years, I say, I have been writing this
column for the makers of Marlboro Cigarettes, and for nine
years they have been paying me money. You are shocked. You
think that anyone who has tasted Marlboro's unparalleled
flavor, who has enjoyed Marlboro's filter, who has revelled in
Marlboro's jolly red and white pack or box should be more than
willing to write about Marlboro without a penny's compensa-
tion. You are wrong.
Compensation is the very foundation stone of the American
Way of Life. Whether you love your work or hate it, our system
absolutely requires that you be paid for it. For example, I
have a friend named Rex Glebe, a veterinarian by profession,
who simply adores to worm dogs. I mean you can call him up
and say, "Hey, Rex, let's go bowl a few lines," or "Hey, Rex,
let's go flatten some pennies on the railroad tracks," and he
will always reply, "No, thanks. I better stay here in case
somebody wants a dog wormed." I mean there is not one thing
in the whole world you can name that Rex likes better than
worming a dog. But even so, Rex always sends a bill for worm-
ing your dog because in his wisdom he knows that to do other-
wise would be to rend, possibly irreparably, the fabric of
democracy.

is absolutely

I

DON'T SAY
you can't find it

N o Time Left!
('til school starts)
MAKE YOUR SENIOR
PICTURE APPOINTMENTS NOW
for the
1963 MICHIGANENSIAN

~0
It's the same with me and Marlboro Cigarettes. I think
Marlboro's flavor represents the pinnacle.of the tobacconist's
art. I think Marlboro's filter represents the pinnacle of the
filter-maker's art. I think Marlboro's pack and box represent
the pinnacle of the packager's art. I think Marlboro is a pleas-
ure and a treasure, and I fairly burst with pride that I have
been chosen to speak for Marlboro on your campus. All the
same, I want my money every week. And the makers of
Marlboro understand this full well. They don't like it, but they
understand it.
In the columns which follow this opening installment, I will
turn the hot white light of truth on the pressing problems of
campus life-the many and varied dilemmas which beset the
undergraduate-burning questions like "Should Chaucer class-

III

!C

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