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September 19, 1962 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-09-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 19.1962

PAGE TWO THE MICHIGAN DAILY WED NP SDAY ~FPTFMUF1?. 1 fl

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POP ULATION CRISES:
Growth Passes Three Billion

MUG Gets Face-Lifting

'PSYCHOLOGICAL DRIVES':
Professors Study Achievement Factors

By THOMAS DRAPER
The world's population has just
passed the three billion mark and
is moving ahead an at annual rate
of 1.8 per cent.
The greatest rates of growth are
in Central America and Southwest
Asia according to the latest Unit-
ed Nations Demographic Survey.
Commenting on 'the recent
growth in population, Prof. A. H.
Hawley of the sociology depart-
ment said in an interview that the
Service Lends
Play Collection
T o Amateurs
Students, professors, community
Stheatres and others in search of
a play to perform may find the
needed help at the University Li-
brary Extension Service.
"Our. play-lending service' al-
,"lows them to borrow plays for
"their selection "committees to
r ead,",Miss Clover M. Flanders,
e tension librarian, explained.
"The collection is extensive and
is supplemented regularly by the
drama publishers as plays are re-
leased for amateur use in this
area," she added.
Publishers catalogs are also
available.
To Give Shots
For Influenza
Flu shots will be given at Health
Service on Thursday and Friday
of this week.
Hours are: 8 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.,
and 1 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. The shots,
which will cover all types of in-
fluenza, will be available to stu-
dents at $1.00 and to members of
the faculty at $1.50.
Those who had a series of shots
last year will find one shot now
" to be sufficient, according to
Health Service officials. Anyone
who did not have such a series
Will need two shots, six to eight
weeks apart. Opportunity for the
second shot in the series will be
given later.
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social and religious norms of these
areas often prevent population
control.

tantly determined that this will
not happen in other areas of Cen-
tral and South America.
Prof. Hawley said that the pri-
mary factor determining the pop-
ulation an area could support is
economic development. The areas
where increasing population re-
sults in deepening poverty are re-
ceptive to Communist propaganda
and revolt.
He said that the United States
has chosen to help these under-
developed countries by aiding their
economy rather than take the
more controversial course of try-
ing to control population.
Legalized Abortion
"In isolated areas there are pro-
grams to c o n t r o 1 population
growth," Prof. Hawley said. "Ja-
pan has legalized abortion. The
government of Taiwan is advocat-
ing the use of contraceptives. Prof.
Hawley said India has planned 20,-
000 family planning clinics. How-
ever, lack of personnel to oper-,
ate the clinics has limited them to
?00."
There have been no new scien-
tific breakthroughs that would en-
able a larger population to enjoy
the same or a .higher standard of
living. However, medical technol-
ogy has made the death rate easy
to lower.
"The use of DDT and immuniza-
tion shots lowered the death rate
in Sicily and Ceylon by 40 per
cent in months," Prof. Hawley
said. "One of the great moral ques-
tions of our time is whether we
can withhold life saving techniques
until the economy is ready for the
people.
"The accuracy and interpreta-
tion of these new statistics must
be examined," Prof. Hawley cau-
tioned.
"In recent years methods of
census taking have greatly im-
proved. A thirty per cent increase
in population could be due to
counting people that just weren't
counted before."

By GERALD STORCH
Using University High School
and Elementary School as their
research laboratory, four profes-
sors are investigating some of the
social and psychological drives
that have a significant affect upon
the educational achievements of
school-age children.
The three-year project, support-
ed by a $90,000 grant from the
United States Office of Education,
is probing into aggressions, group
dimensions, creative thinking and
perceptual development these chil-
dren exhibit.
The four researchers-Professors
Warren Ketcham and William
Morse of the education school,
and Richard Cutler and Elton Mc-
Neil of the psychology department
-will integrate their findings into
a comprehensive final report.
Use Equipment
They are using psychological ap-
paratus tests, a variety of intelli-
gence tests, class observation and
interviews with parents as their
major means of gathering data,
and will follow up these patterns,
relating the data to several in-
dices, as the children develop
through the years.
The researchers hope to gain a
renewal of their grant at the end
of the three-year period, because,
as Prof. Cutler pointed out yester-
day, the entire childhood period
should be studied for a thorough
understanding of school achieve-
ment.

PROF. A. W. HAWLEY
population explosion

-Daily-Bruce Taylor
SEALED IN A PLASTIC BUBBLE-The MUG is no longer a quiet
meeting and eating place. Saws buzz, hammers pound, but it's all
caused by the remodeling effort now under way in the Michigan
Union.
TRAINEE PLAN:
FPA Initiates Pro grain
For SGC Leadership

Prof. Ketcham is looking into
the creative thinking process, and
attempting to develop an adequate
mechanism of discerning and
measuring signs of creativity in
early childhood.
Anti-School Outlooks
Group characteristics that re-
sult in anti-school or educational-
ly-favorable outlooks are Prof.
Morse's area of inquiry. He is
examining a hypothesis that if a
class of children is kept intact
through several years, the group
attitude towards schooling will re-
main the same.
U r MMIoinmoerGooZ rT.
DIAL 5-6290
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"T FUN I"
-Harper's Bazaar
.SOME OF THE
GREATEST FUN HOILYWOOD
HAS EVER PRODUCEDI
- Redbook
"CO« SSAV
-playbo

"This is a film
that can be
interpreted
and argued
over almost as
endlessly as
life itself."
N. Y. Post

I 1

Prof. Cutler is researching the
cognitive and perceptual develop-
ment of children as young as three
years old. He is trying to find out
when each child learns to discrim-
inate among symbols (for instance,
in telling a "b" from a "d"), and
by what means this development
can be discovered and measured.
Aggression-how it emerges and
how it is expressed-is Prof. Mc-
Neil's field of investigation. Prob-
lems such as how aggressive in-
stincts are channeled into fighting
or bullying, or into leadership and
outstanding schoolwork, are being
considered.
Dial 8-6416

there is some resistance in the
Moslem religion because four is a
magic number and, therefore, the
preferred size for a family.
Manhood is believed to be dem-
onstrated by having male progeny.
Wherever the family is the econ-
omic unit, the family will increase
its numbers to gain economic
strength.
In Central America the Cath-
olic Church prohibits any system
of birth control except the rhythm
method. Prof. Hawley said, how-
ever, that to expect the use of. the
rhythm method with semi-literate
people was ludicrous because they
did not have the knowledge nec-
essary to make it work.
He said that in Puerto Rico the
Church was pushed aside and birth
control information is available.
However, the Church is now mili-

GRADUATES ELIGIBLE:
Scholarships Now Available
For Study in Great Britain

By ELLEN SILVERMAN
Applications are available Im-
mediately for Marshall Scholar-
ships for study in Great Britain.
Students with a 3.0 average or
better who have already received
a degree and are under the age of
25 are eligible, Ivan Parker, assist-
ant to the director of financial
aids, said yesterday.
The applications are available
in Rm. 2011 SAB and must be re-
turned by Oct. 8.
24 Scholarships
(The posters now on campus
list the date for submitting appli-
cations to the regional office as
Oct. 22 but since the University is
not a regional office applications
must be in sooner, Parker noted.)
Twenty-four scholarships will be
Raether To Give
Electron Lecture
Prof. H. Raether, director of the
Institute for Applied Physics at the
University of Hamburg, will speak
on "Inelastic Scatterings of Elec-
trons by Crystals" at 4 p.m. today
in Rm. 1300 Chemistry Bldg.
Folklore Society
Folk Sing and Meeting
Tomorrow 8 p.m.

offered throughout the country.
Each one has a two year tenure at
any one of 26 British colleges or
universities including the Univer-
sities of Oxford, Cambridge and
London.
There have been three Univer-
sity winners in the past, Parker
said. "University students have
rated quite well there, too."
The scholarship is awarded on
the basis of scholarship and cam-
pus activities. A. student may ap-
ply for any program which will
lead to a degree from the British
institution.
Awarded by Region
Four scholarships for each re-
gion of the United States will be
awarded. The University is includ-
ed in the midwestern region which
encompasses Illinois, In d i an a,
Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minneso-
ta, Missouri, Nebraska, North Da-
kota, South Dakota and Wiscon-
sin.
Married students are eligible for
the scholarship and provisions will
be made for supplementary funds
if amarried male student is
awarded the scholarship.
Sawyer To Speak
To Nuclear Society
The student branch of the Amer-
ican Nuclear Society is sponsoring
a talk by Vice-President for Re-
search and Dean of the Graduate
School Ralph A. Sawyer on "Re-
search at the University" at 7:30
p.m. today in Room 3B of the
Michigan Union.

By JAMES NICHOLS
"A program of orientation for
fraternity men who are interested
in becoming members of Student
Government Coucil or working in
related areas of activities" was
approved by Fraternity Presidents
Association at their retreat Sept.
13, according to Inter-Fraternity
Council President John Meyerholz,
'63BAd.
Meyerholz explained the purpose
of the experimental program "is
to inform the men on many of the
issues important to them as poten-
tial SGC candidates."
Improve Candidates
He said he hopes programs like
this will improve the quality of
future SGC candidates. "We wish
other organizations would pick this
idea up," Meyerholz said.
Panhellenic President Ann Mc-
Millan said no such program is
planned for her group this year.
She explained she thinks it is very
important that women "under-
stand how SGC works, understand
what types of things it considers,
and understand the beliefs of
members and candidates."
Consider Plan Next Year
A plan like the FPA program
"might be a very good idea for
ORGAN IZATION
NOTICES
USE OF THIS COLUMN for announce-
ments is available to officially recog-
nized and registered organizations only.
Organizations planning to be active for
the fall session 'should register by
Oct. 8, 1962. Forms available, 1011 Stu-
dent Activities Bldg.
S* s
Chess Club, First Meeting, Sept. 19,
7:30 p.m., Mich. Union, 3rd Floor, Rms.
K-L.
K-.* * *
Christian Science Organization, Week-
ly Meeting, Sept. 20, 7:30 p.m. 528D
SAB.
* * *
Sailing Club, Open Meeting, Sept. 19,
7:45 p.m., League Ballroom.

next year, but we Just don't have
anythign like that in our sched-
ule for this year;" she said.
In other action, FPA approved a
change in the counseling system
used during Aish.
Beginning this year, each stu-
dent participating in rush will be
assigned a counselor to help with
any problems he encounters. Pre-
viously, unassigned counselors were
available in the Union. Meyerholz
predicted the new system would be
more effective.
Pi Lambda Theta
To Hear Lofgren
Prof. Ruth Lofgren of Brooklyn
College will speak on "Education
for Freedom" at the 40th anniver-
sary meeting of the University
chapter of Pi Lambda Theta, na-
tional honorary education sorority.
The talk, at 1:30 p.m. in the Hen-
derson Rm. of the Michigan,
League, is open to the public..

Oriental Art
The James Marshall Plumer
Collection of Oriental Art will be
the major exhibit through Octo-
ber in the University of Michigan
Museum of Art in Alumni Hall.
"Contemporary Paintings, praw-
ings, and Sculpture" will also be
on display at that time. The ex-
hibits will appear in the North and
South galleries, respectively.
The "Handbook of the Collec-
tions Exhibition," which opened
last spring, will continue through
September, and "Prints and Draw-
ing, 16th through 19th Centuries"
will continue through October 14,
in the West gallery.
An exhibit of contemporary
color prints from the museum's
permanent collection will be shown
on the first floor of the Under-
graduate Librarythrough October
24.

'U' Museum
To Exhibit

11

"I

MC }m UNON'meI I Ma
DitritedbyLOPERT PICTURES CORPURATION
FRIDAY *
"ROCCO
ANq HIS
BROTHERS"

11

Dial 1Il li
2-6264 THURSDAY
624 r d B ENDING
12:45 I mu
rs oenATSTHRIll L CLASSIC OF ALL TM

I

The University of Michigan
NEWMAN CLUB
Presents a'
Reception and Meeting
for Graduate Students

Wed., Sept. 19
Newman Club

8:00 PMO
311 Thompson

aw HERBERT LOM' HEATHER SEARS mjosTminGTHORLEY WALTERS
MICHAEL GOUGH A IAMMERFILMPRbUCTION .A UNIYERSA-INTERNO REWASE
* FRIDAY *
JEFFREY HUNTER "NO MAN IS AN ISLAND"

In the interests of continuing educational asd social
events for Catholic Students at Michigan, we en-
courage your presence this evening that you might
enjoy an even finer selection of lectures, panels,
discussions, dinners, mixers, parties and trips during
the coming year.

I

On the Mall between
the League and Hill Aud.
or in the Union
depending on the weather

The Michigan Union is Your Key to Success
Join the Union Activities Staff
at the
FALL ACTIVITIES MEETING
Help direct projects like:
ORIENTATION
WORLD'S FAIR
HATCHER OPEN HOUSE
CREATIVE ARTS FESTIVAL

i

I

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