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September 14, 1962 - Image 25

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-09-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

1962

THE MICHIGAN DAii.V

1982 TU uaI VaTC V AlJK~.'V.

L I&+1-lr * ry" ,f 1:e- r

ANALYZES TRUE LOVE:
Blood Urges Pretesting of Sweethearts

Writing in his recently-publish-
ed book, "Marriage," Prof. Robert
0. Blood of the sociology depart-
ment declares that present-day,
courtship demands a harder and
more realistic view by each party
of each other.
Because contemporary mate-se-
lection often involves individuals.
who did not grow up together, a
period of pretesting is necessary to
discover the true characteristics of
the couple.
The decline of the childhood
sweethearts means it is wise to see
the prospective spouse in as many
situations as possible and to study
family and friends, so that vir-
tues and defects which are usually
spotted in the younger years can
also be detected at the adult level.
Prof. Blood provides a testing
prograpm forcouples in doubt of
their compatibility.

4

It features a series of varied
dating activities, visiting each1
other's homes, meeting friends,
discussion, solving problems and
taking time.
The author furnishes a ration-
ale for each step in his cau t.h:.ip
program:
Free Dates
Varied dating activities-"Va-
riety can be found in participant
as well as spectator activities. Only
by doing things that require no
admission ticket can people dis-
cover how much they really enjoy
each other.
"A second variation involves the
setting for dates. Traditionally
dating is catalyzed. by starlight,
perfume and maybe a little alco-
hol. Does the relationship survive
in jeans, chill winds, or dripping
sweat? Also, group activities may
yield different perspectives from
pair-dating."
Visiting each other's homes -
"People usually resemble their par-
ents. More important than Just
getting' a look at the partner's
parents is the chance to see how
he gets along with them. This adds
depth to compatibility testing since
it reflects the parents' influence
during his formative years."
True Love
Meeting friends--"Guilt by as-
sociation may be poor judicial pro-
cedure but good psychology. Re-
search confirms the adage that
'birds of a feather flock together."
Discussion-"Simple as it may
seem, sheer talk deserves mention
as a step toward better under-
standing., Seldom do couples let
down the barriers and talk about
themselves: their feelings, aspira-
tions, ideas. Conversations can
probe the past and the future as
well."

Solving problems-' "The ability
to arrive at mutually satisfactory
decisions is vital to marriage. Be-
fore engagement is the time to
test out problem-solving ability
with married-couple seriousness."
Time Will Tell
Taking time-"The passage of
time tests the wearing qualities of
a relationship. As the months go
by does it wear well, or does it
begin to get on the nerves?"
Prof. Blood asserts that the en-
gagement period for such pretest-
ing therefore has its value.
"It is an opportunity to see
what it feels like to be almost mar-
ried but not quite-partly commit-
ted but not completely."
Two More Advantages
Engagements have two other
worthy attributes.
They serve public'notice of seri-

ous intent. Not only are outsiders
such as parents given a chance to
intervene, but also the couple is
given a taste of what it's like to
be recognized as a unit.
Secondly, the engagement "sets
the wheels of planning turniag at
full speed. Plans must be made not
only for the wedding and hwney-
moon but also for the first year
of marriage."
"The engagement period lasts
so long that we rarely think of it
as a ceremony. However, the girl's
ring on her finger, picture in the
paper and round of showers merit
the use of the term even. though
the male partner is marginal to
the process.
"In any society, ritualization of!
the transition from single youth-
fulness to married adulthood adds
strength and stability to the insti-
tution of marriage," he writes.

SPECIAL S A LE
V
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- -~> < c c a ~ ~ o ~ ~ >- ~ cc c -i } ~ ~ tc -s ~ ~ s~ t

Welcone Gentlemen

PROF. ROBERT O. BLOOD
'engages' in courtship

LIRC OFFICIAL:
Rogers Asks U.S. Court
For MSU Reinstatement

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....:.:....:.
J -""ir.
f
4
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Charles A. Rogers, placed on in-
voluntary leave of absence as as-
sociate director of the Michigan
State University Labor and Indus-
trial Center (LIRC) in mid-June,
has asked the United States dis-
trict court to order MSU either to
reinstate him or pay him $750,000.
The June dismissal a c t i o n
against Rogers, who was subse-
quently accused of favoring the
policies of management, inspired
a barrage of complaints and ac-
cusotions from the state Legisla-
ture that the LIRC had a pro-
labor bias.
The Legislature also recom-
mended that its operation be ter-
minated. However, 14SU denied
Name Winners
of Fellowship
With APA Unit
The names of seven winners of
fellowships with the University's
resident Association of Producing
Artist (APA) theatre company and
the speech department were an-
pounced recently by Prof. Robert
C. Schnitzer, executive director of
the threatre program, and William
P. Halstead, head of the theatre
area of the speech department.
Winners in the acting catagory
are: Toward Roy, Grad, Kay Voigt
of the University of Washington,
Nancy Fowlkes of the University
of Wisconsin, Rod Bladel of the
Yale University Drama School and
Leonard Raymond of Emerson
College.
A technical fellowship was
awarded to Agnes A. Gordon of
Carnegie Institute of Technology.
Richard Asch, Grad, won a fellow-
ship in administration and public
relations.-
IThe fellowship winners will each
receive a'stipend of $2750. They
will take part in the productions
of APA .Fall and Winter Drama
Festivals and in the drama pro-
gram of the speech department
while earning credits toward ad-
'vanced degrees.
The winners-were chosen from
among 50 graduate candidates of
the nation's leading university
drama departments. The APA also
participated in the selections.

the charges and since decided to
continde the LIRC.
But the university put the cen-
ter under the control of its College
of Social Science, a status similar
to the programs at the University
and Wayne State University. Pre-
viously, the LIRC had not been
part of any larger academic unit
at MSU, and its independence was
a matter of some concern to the
legislators.
The MSU trustees offered Rog-
ers a different position at the uni-
versity, which he rejected, de-
manding that he be given the
directorship.
Rogers alleged that the board
of trustees had committed a
breach of contract by removing
him from his teaching position,
and by threatening to terminate
his paid leave of absence, effective
Aug. 31.
The suit filed asked' that the
university be enjoined from ter-
minating his leave of absence. He
also asked the court to order him
reinstated as associate director of
the center or to a comparable posi-
tion or have MSU pay him a cash,
settlement of $750,000, plus inter-
est and taxable court costs.
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11

THE UNIVERSITY SHOP "SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

II

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