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December 06, 1964 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1964-12-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE EIGHT

THE MICHIGAN UAli',V

owylky"Altr 0 InAA

1. 11I 1111 V1L1 VG'S 1 1)111LI

SUZNDAY~, UDECEMBER 6~, 1964~

'M' Defense

Holds

Opponents

to

Low

Yardae...

1

The old saying "the best offense
is a good defense," is somewhat
of an exaggeration, but it does
point out the importance of the
defensive unit.
Thishas been the case at Mich-
igan this year, even though the
offensive crew proved so potent.
The men entrusted with the re,
sponsibility for stopping the op-
position frequently received loud
applause from the fans for their
fine work.
Shutouts were registered against
Navy, Northwestern, and, of
course, Ohio State. Two, other foes
-Air Force and Illinois - were
held to a single touchdown.
Statistically speaking, the de-
fense allowed less points a game
than any other Big Ten outfit.'
The Wolverines were also among
the top 10 teams in the country
in the same category.
In terms of yardage, Michigan
allowed opponents to pick up their
share--at least until they reached
the most important 30 yards in
front of the goal line. No Michi-
gan fan can forget the dramatic
goal line stand in the closing min-1
utes of the Minnesota game to
keep Wolverine title hopes alive.

JIM CONLEY, 6'3", 198 pounds,
from Springdale, Pa. Conley, a
hard-blocking, hard-tackling left
end captained the 1964 Wolverine
team. A versatile player, Conley
began his third season, this year,
with 554 minutes'of playing time
behind him. As a sophomore, he
played 228 minutes on both of-
fense and defense.,

GERRY MADER, 6'3", 223
pounds, from Chicago, Ill. The
rugged defensive tackle is a three
year letterman. He played extens-
ively in the Illinois game and has
been starting ever since. The
senior in engineering won all-
city and all-state honors at
Brother Rice High School in
Chicago.

ARNIE SIMKUS, 6'4", 230
pounds, from Detroit. Simkus is-
a third year veteran on the 1964
Wolverine team. He earned his
letter in his sophomore year
playing a total of 111 minutes. He
is especially adept at flattening
opposing quarterbacks before they
can get off their passes. He was
drafted by the Cleveland Browns.

BOB MIELKE, 6'1", 206 pounds,
from Chicago, Ill. Mielke in his
first varsity season, has developed
into a top-notch defensive right
guard. He assumed a starting role
when Rich Hahn was sidelined
and the coaches have been quite
pleased with his progress. Mielke
was a fullback on the freshman
squad.

BILL YEARBY, 6'3", 222 pounds
from Detroit. The hard hitting
junior tackle has made quite a
name for himself. Formerly an
end, he has developed into an All-
American in his second session at
his position. Yearby is a versatile
athlete who finished third in the
shot put at the Big Ten meet last
spring.

BILL LASKEY, 6'2", 217 pounds,
from Milan. Laskey, originally a
halfback prospect, was shifted to
right end as a freshman. Operat-
ing from the end spot since his
sophomore year, he played a total
of 184 minutes as a soph. In his
junior year, he snagged seven
passes for 105 yards and one
touchdown.

FRANK NUNLEY, 6' 2", 225
pounds, from Belleville. Nunley, a
converted fullback, proved him-
self an able right linebacker in
his first varsity season. An out-
standing high school athlete,
Nunley was named all-league and
all-area in football, basketball
and baseball. Nunley is a sopho-
more in education.

Final Big Ten Standings

Conference

All Games

W
MICHIGAN .................. 6
Ohio State ................... 5
Purdue ....................... 5
Minnesota........4
Illinois.................... 4
Michigan State..............3
Northwestern .. ............... 2
Wisconsin .................... 2
Indiana ..................... 1
Iowa .........................1

T

L T.
1 0
1 0
2 0
3 0
3 0
3 0
5 0
5 0
5 0
5 0

W
8
7
6
5
6
4
3
3
2
3

L
1
2
3
4
3
5
6
6
7
6

T
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

PF
201
146
168
136
132
136
95
98
154
170

PA
76
76
146
131
100
141
164
190
211
209

POST-SEASON AWARDS:
Timberlake Leads Team
In AlIl-A merica Honors'

Final
Pacific Eight (AAWU)
Conference

Standings
All Games

The scene is the locker room
after any Michigan victory.
Sportswriters c r o w d around l
Bump Elliott, congratulating him
and asking who was the star of
the game.
"It was a team victory," is often
his answer.
But on any team there are al-
ways certain players who stand
out.
At Michigan Bob Timberlake
has been reaping most of the
awards. The . senior quarterback
has been named to several all-
select teams chosen by sports pub-
lications and wire services.
He was named to the first unit
of the Associated Press All-
American team and just barely
missed the same honors on the
UPI squad. As it was he made the
second string.

W L
Oregon State ................. 3 1
USC ......................... 3 1
Washington ..................5 2
UCLA...................... 2 2
Stanford ......3 4
Oregon. .................. 1 2
Wash. State.................1 2
Caifornia. . . ........0 4

T
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
0

W
8
7
6
4
5
7
7
3

L
2
3
4
6
5
2
2
7

T
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
0

PF
142
187
139
145
150
170
170
152

PA
90
113
110
236
138
107
107
187

Timberlake has also been chosen
by the Look Magazine, National
Broadcasting Company, and Foot.........
ball News as one of the nation'
top eleven gridders. He is a lead-
ing candidate for the Western -
Conference's Most Valuable Player
Award.
Despite the acclaim for Tim-
berlake, other Wolverines have
also gotten their share of the
limelight. Tackle Bill Yearby made!
many pre-season All-American
teams and the early confidence
was well justified. The big line-!TOM CECCHINI, 6', 200 pounds,
man is among the top six defen- om eCCit.,As ,a2topounde,
sive tackles in most experts opin- from Detroit. As a top center
ions, as he has been placed on prospect in the 1963 season, Cec-
several All-American teams in- chini played 141 minutes in fourr
cluding the American Football games before he was sidelined
Coaches Association and Football with a knee injury in the Purdue
News as well as second team on game. Previously, he had been
the AP and UPI squads. chosen as UPI lineman of the
week for his fine performance
Captain Jim Conley, Tom Cec- against Michigan State. Returningc
chini, Dick Rindfuss, Carl Ward, !to the Wolverines, in 1964, Cec-
and Mel Anthony received honor- chini, again, distingushed himself,
able mention on the AP team. this time as a linebacker. He was
Michigan also dominated the again named UPI lineman of the
All-Big Ten team. Timberlake week, for his defensive play in
was a unanimous choice, as was the Ohio State game which;
Yearby. A host of other Wolver- brought Michigan the Big Ten
ines received mention on the sec- crown. He made the All-Big Ten1
ond and third teams or got notice defensive team of both AP and1
for honorable mention honors. ; UPI.

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A 4AI

RICK YOLK, 6'3", 200 pounds,
from Wauseon, Ohio. Volk played
mainly as a defensive halfback
this year, but he tossed a 33-yard
touchdown pass to end John Hen-
derson in the Northwestern con-
test and carried the pigskin five
times for a 4.6 yards average. Only
a sophomore, Volk turned in one
of his best efforts of the season!
against OSU intercepting two
passes to halt key Ohio StateI
drives. He was placed on the first
team defensive unit of the Chi-
cago Daily News All-Midwest
squad. Next season, Volk may bei
a candidate to replace Bob Tim-
berlake at quarterback if he can
be spared from his defensive
duties.I

DICK RINDFUSS, 6', 192 RICK S Y G A R, 5'11", 185
pounds, from Niles, Ohio. He's pounds, from Niles, Ohio. Sygar
seen action primarily as a defen- was the top candidate for the
sive halfback in his senior season. right halfback position in 1963,
He served as Ward's replacement but he suffered a broken leg in
on the offensive unit firing a 47- fall drills which put him out for
yard' bomb to Detwiler on the the season. He came back strong
first play from scrimmage against this year seeing action on both
Purdue. In 1963 Rindfuss drove for offense and defense. It was his

211 yards and a 3.64 yard average
logging more playing time, 425
minutes, than any other Wolver-
ine. He played under Tony Ma-
son, Michigan offensive line coach,
at McKinley High where he was
selected as a high school All-
American. Among his post-season
honors, he was named to the As-
sociated Press All-America honor-
able mention list.

31-yard pass that gave the Wol-
verines their victory over Mich-
igan State. Sygar also scored a
touchdown in the first Michigan
victory over MSU in nine years.
A mainstay at defensive safety
this year, he demonstrated the
ability that led him to be chosen
Ohio Back of the Year in 1960
and Ohio Athlete of the Year in
1961.

... .. ..... .. .... ....
---------- --

$ . 7

.- $ /
«-y 7'

54

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