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December 06, 1964 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1964-12-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

'OULD BE 'DREAM TEAM:
6 Years of M'

All-Americans

LE SIELAFF
I coach could bring
Michigan All-Amer-
st years into one
i," he could sleep
it would-be a hard
n, Benny Friedman,
baan, Bob Chappuis,
rothers, Ron Kram-
ndary figures in the
iletic world, and all
art of the "dream
ye been honored by
L-American teams.
; center, the coach
between Michigan's
rican William Cun-
the "greatest center
ais ever produced,"
nany" Schulz. Cun-
ection in 1898 broke
itten tradition that
s had to play for,
ard, or Amherst.
OIng the Hold
emergence as a foot-
broke the hold the
Parade

Eastern schools had on the All-
American ;teams. Schulz became
the Wolverines' third All-Ameri-
can in 1907, and is remembered for
his rough, aggressive play when
the game was strictly 'a power
sport.
Moving down the line, the lucky
coach would have seven guards to
choose from. Harry Hawkins play-
ed for the 1925 team which al-
lowed 3 points in 8..games. Albert
Benbrook was named All-Ameri-
can in 1909 and 1910. Replace-
ments could be chosen from the
likes of big Ralph Heikkinen or
1942 All-American Julius Frank.
In the Family
At tackle, there is something of
a family monopoly Francis Wist-
ert began the family tradition in
1933, playing left tackle, and be-
ing named All-American. Albert
Wistert continured the family Im
age with his 1942 selection, and
little brother Alvin, at the ripe
old age of 32, went his brothers
one better by being named All-
American in '48 and '49. Upon
his graduation number 11-worn
by all three-was retired.
Wolverine All-American tackles
who aren't related include Allen'
Wahl, Merv Pregulman and Art
Walker. Wahl played on Michi-
gan's last Rose Bowl team in1951.
Deep at End
Michigan has always been bless-
ed with great ends, and any coach
should have only two problems in
hpicking his receivers-who should
'he play, and for how long? Ten
Wolverine ends have been select-
ed All-American on 14 teams.
Multiple winners Bennie Ooster-
baan (1925-26-27), the only triple
winner in Michigan history, Ted
Petoskey (1932-33), and Ron Kra-
mer (1955-56) would give our
coach three standouts. But with
subs like Dick Rifenburg from
the 1948 national champions and
known as one of the game's hard-
est blockers, and Lowell Perry
who starred in 1951, it would cer-
tainly be hard to single out the
starters.
In the backfield, our coach
could close his eyes and still come
up with four starters who would

BUMP ELLIOTT'

RON KRAMER TOM HARMON

Form

Very Early
By JIM GREINER
Remember the little old lady of
Colorado Blvd. in Pasadena?
Well, if you intend to see the
Tournament' of Roses Parade
without a ticket, you may be well-
acquainted with her by the time
the parade marches by.
It is typical, if not suggested,
that people without tickets camp
overnight on the street. At least,
if you don't do that, get your chair
on the curb two. or three days
ahead of time.
Stands are annually constructed
along the principal Colorado Blvd.
route for observers. Tickets gener-
ally sell for around six dollars
apiece.
A Curbside Seat
However, if you would like to
take a chance without a ticket,
and you arrive early enough, you
might get a curbside seat.
The best places to see the pa-
rade without a ducat is along Si-
erra Madre Blvd., near the eastern
terminus of the parade route. No
stands are erected in this area but
eight-foot step-ladders are com-
mon. It is suggested that you ar-
rive in these places by 8:30 a.m.
on New Year's at the latest.
Parade Begins Early
The parade begins at 8:45 a.m.
at Del Mar Blvd. and South Or-
ange Grove Blvd. It reaches its
most famed point (where the tel-
evision cameras are) of Colorado
and South Orange Grove at 8:53
a.m.
It takes another hour and 26
minutes to traverse Colorado and
reach Sierra Madre Blvd. It finally
reaches the post-parade area of
Victory Park in northeastern Pas-
adena at 10:48.
Allow about two hours for the
parade to pass.
All floats will remain on display
in the post-parade area for. about
three or four days, in case you
miss seeing the parade or would
like to see the floats at close range.

probably let him rest easy for the
entire season. Benny Friedman
kicked, passed, and directed the
1925 team to its title, and is known'
as the' "greatest field general of
his era.'"
Scrambling o Glory
Harry Newman was a scrambler
who earned his All-American rat-.
ing in 1932. Newman was a pow-
erful runner with a good passing
arm. The 1948 team was led by the
passing of Pete Elliott.
At'halfback,.Tom Harmon prob-
ably stands out in most people's
minds. The sight of number 98
zigzagging his way up the field
became a familiar sight to fans
across the country during his All-
American years of 1939 and .940.
Harry Kipke, former Michigan
coach, earned his All-American
status in.1922 as ft power runner.
Willie Heston won honors in both
1903 and 1904, as his hard run-
ning, led the Wolverines to two
undefeated seasons, including wins
of 130-0 and 95-0.
Two at Once
Bob Chappuis and Bump Elliott
teamed both on Michigan's team
and on the 1947 All-American
team. Chappuis passed and rang
to the Wolverine all time total of-

fense erecord of 1,395 yards,.while.
Elliott, who is now coaching some
potential All-Americans. of his
own, grabbed 16 passes and rush-
ed for 438 yards giving him an
impressive 6.4 average.
Michigan's . last All-American,
Jimmy Pace, could fill in ably in
the backfield, and his breakaway
speed would be a threat'with any
"dream team."
At fullback, candidates such as
Bill Daley and Bob Westfall would

fight for the top spot. Daley
known as a line plunger, earned
his right to play for the dream
team in 1943, while Westfall qual
ified in 1941. Two hard runner:
of an earlier era, Cedric Smith
and Frank Steketee would roun
out the fullback corps.
With a squad of 46 men, al
proven, outstanding ballplayers
all recognized as All-Americans
our dream coach would have a
easy coaching Job.

f
F
t
r
3
_i
i
y
t.
z

Michigan All-Americans

CENTERS
William Cunningham 1898
Adolph Schulz 1907
Henry Vick 1921
Jack Blott 1923
Maynard Morrison 1931
Chuck Bernard 1933
GUARDS
Al Benbrook 1909-10
Ernest Allmendinger 1917
Frank Culver 1917
E. R. Slaughter 1924
Harry Hawkins 1925
Ralph Heikkinen 1938
Julius Franks 1942
TACKLES
Miller Pontius 1913
Otto Pommerening 1928
Francis Wistert 1933
Albert Wistert 1942
Mervin Pregulman 1943
(. Alvin Wistert 1948-49
Allen Wahl 1950
Art Walker 1954
ENDS
Neil Snow 1901'
Stanfield Wells 1910

ENDS (cont.)
Paul Goebel 1922
Bennie Oosterbaan 1925-26-27
Ted Petoskey 1932-33
a Ed Frutig 1940
Elmer Madar 1946
Dick Riefenburg 1948
Lowell Perry 1951
Ron Kramer 1955-56
QUARTERBACKS
Benny Friedman 1926
Harry Newman 1932
Pete Elliott 1948
HALFBACKS
Willie Heston 1903-04
Jim Craig 1913
John Maulbetsch 1914
Harry Kipke 1922
Tom Harmon 1939-40
Bob Chappuis 1947
Bump Elliott 1947
Jim Pace 1957
FULLBACKS
Cedric Smith 1917
Frank Steketee 1918
Bob Westfall 1941
Bill Daley 1943

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