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December 06, 1964 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1964-12-06

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ROSE BOWL'
SUPPLEMENT

YI rL

.itI

aitdf

ROSE BOWL
SUPPLEMENT

Seventy-Four Years of Editorial Freedom
VOL. LXXV, NO. 82 ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, DECEMBER 6, 1964

SECOND SECTION

LOLLIPOPS TO ROSES:
Elliott Builds Champion Team

Big
To

Ten Champs
Travel West

By TOM WEINBERG
Renowned by newspapermen as
the silent potentate of Michigan
athletics, H. 0. (Fritz) Crisler was
far from mum in his praise for the
Wolverines' Coach Bump Elliott at
a recent press luncheon.
"This entire season is a great
tribute to Bump and his staff,"
Crisler said. "To be able to over-
come all the injuries to starting
players this season and still come
out so well is a fine accomplish-
ment."
At the age of 39, Chalmers W.
Elliott will complete his sixth sea-
son as the chief mentor of his
alma mater with what he terms
"the biggest game of the year" in
Pasadena on New Year's Day.
An All-America whom his coach
Crisler called "the greatest right
halfback I ever saw or coached,"
has gone from roses to lollipops-
and back to roses since his foot-
ball career began in Bloomington,
Illinois in 1940.
First Bloom
The original roses were in the
1947 classic where he took his,
most valuable player in the Big
Ten tag into a 49-0 drubbing of
Southern California. From there,
the World War II Marine Corps
veteran went to Oregon State (of
all places) to join former Michi-
gan star Kip Taylor's staff as an
assistant coach.
At Oregon State, the reunion of
Michigan's All-American brother
team, Pete and Bump, was to be-
come a reality as they worked

together for two seasons before
Pete moved on to Oklahoma as an
assistant to Bud Wilkinson..
In 1952, the older son of an
Illinois doctor and football coach,
Bump accepted a post as back-
field tutor for a downtrodden Iowa
team coached by another former
Michigan great, Forest Evashev-
ski.
Important Iowan
"There's no doubt about it,"
Evashevski said this week while
he was toastmaster of the annual
Detroit football bust, "Bump was
instrumental in Iowa's climb from
the cellar to national prominence."
During Elliott's five year stay at
Iowa, the Hawkeyes copped a Big
Ten title and picked up a Rose
Bowl win as well. In 1957, Elliott
consulted with Evashevski and de-
cided to return to Michigan to help
Bennie Oosterbaan with the Wol.
verine backs.
When Oosterbaan stepped down
two years later, the 34-year-old
Elliott with no experience as a
head coach, and with just 10 years
of coaching under his belt, assum-
ed the role of prime mover of
Michigan football fortunes. Tradi-
tionally the leaders of not only
the West but of the entire nation,
the Wolverines were rstumbling.
It took six years for the roses
to bloom again, but bloom they
have this season, as Elliott has
guided his teams from the cellar
to the top in just three seasons.
A mediocre debut in 1959 saw
a nonetheless improved 4-5 sea-
son, which the Wolverines were

able to reverse in the 1960 cam-
paign. Paced by the hard-running
Bennie McRae and Dave Raimey,
the 1961 squad posted a 6-3 rec-
ord, but could only break even in
the Big Ten.
At the Bottom
The 1962 disaster season saw
Elliott's charges sink to the depths
of the conference with a 1-6 mark
and 2-7 overall, but last season
provided a brief sniff of the roses
that were to come a year later, as
a young and inconsistent team
dealt Pete Elliott's Big Ten cham-
;ion Illini their only defeat and
tied runnerup Michigan State.
The road to the roses this year
for Elliott has been somewhat
rocky, but the determined father
of -three whose faith in his players
proved justified this season says
he's "tickled pink," with what he
calls the "greatest thrill" in his
career.

S

S

1
.
i
j
1
1
1

i

M' Gridders Compile 8-1 Record
After Two Straight Losing Seasons
By TOM ROWLAND
Associate Sports Editor

-Associated Press

THE NEWLY CROWNED BIG TEN CHAMPION Michigan Wolverines celebrate in the locker room
after the title-clinching 10-0 victory over Ohio State at Columbus. Finishing the season with an
8-1 record and ranked fourth nationally, the Wolverines face the Oregon State Beavers in the Rose
Bowl on New Year's Day.

wolverine 'Ti'rae -oster

Elliott Names
So.Travel Roster
215 S.Of 44 Players

ENDS
Conley, Jim .... . .......... .6-3
Farabee, Ben3............. 6-3
Henderson, John.............6-3
Hoyne, Jeff .................. 6-1
Kemp, Stan .................. 6-1
Kirby, Craig .. . ..............6-2
Laskey, Bill .................. 6-2

198
205
185
195
195
190
217
202
230
202

Wright, Ken .... ..............6-1
Sr.
Sr. CENTERS
Sr. Cecchini, Tom ................ 6-0
Jr. Patchen, Brian .............. 5-11
So. Muir, Bill .................... 6-0
Jr. Nunley, Frank........... ..... 6-2
Sr.
Jr. QUARTERBACKS
Jr. Evashevski, Frosty ............ 6-0
So. Gabler, Wally .................6-2
Timberlake, Bob...... . . . .....6-4

It took Michigan fans a while to get accustomed to halfbacks
throwing for touchdowns, fullbacks hauling in daring pitchouts in
last-split-second fashion and scatbacks taking quick laterals, hurdling
two blockers, and scampering into the end zone.
It took longer to stand in line at the SAB to hand over $200
for a trip to Pasadena.
But this was Michigan football, 1964, and only the bold print
of Look magazine and the hesitant hopes of the staunchest Wolverine
fans dared forecast that Bump Elliott's crew--a team that had
only won five games in the past two years-would walk off with
an undisputed Big Ten championship, 8-1 season mark, and trip
to the Rose Bowl to face Oregon State on New Year's Day.
No Prediction
But en route to the top no one would forecast that a sophomore
third string halfback would pile up 6.5 yards a carry in his fir
game, or that a defensive half who had broken his leg on two
separate occasions the year before would beat Michigan State, or
that University President Harlan Hatcher would stand with his
pantlegs rolled up in four inches of snow.
It was evident from the first time that Captain 'Jim Conley
led the Wolverines onto the field in the opener against the Air
Force that this was going to be a -different Michigan team-
infamous for its past two years of football floundering. Here was a
team that went 80 yards for a touchdown the first time it got its
hands on the football.
Nine and 40
Nine weeks later-and 40 degrees colder-Ohio State halfback Bo
Rein bobbled Stan Kemp's punt and Wolverine end John Henderson
scooted to cover the ball. Two plays and it was halfback Jim
Detwiler hauling in All-America-to-be Bob Timberlake's pass for
the Michigan touchdown. They carried Elliott off the field after
the final gun sounded the Wolverines' title-clinching 10-0 victory
over the Buckeyes, and yellow roses decorated the Michigan locker-
room for the first time in 14 years.
There had been a bevy of questions for Elliott to answer in
his sixth year of coaching at Ann Arbor. What about the forward
" wall, missing a big chunk where
1963 stalwarts Tom Keating and
Joe O'Donnell had held sway?
Answer-a crew of newcomers
O oste haan with a -small veteran nucleus
O osterb n would stymie Navy's Rober Stau-
bach on defense aid pace a team
that led the nation in offensive
ow l Team s rushing yards for most of the
season.

200
215
210
225
185
192
215

Jr.
Sr.
Sr.1
So.
Sr.
Jr.
Sr.

Parkhill, Tom
Smith, Steve..
Wilhite, Clayt

.6-2
6-5
. ............... 6-4

Coach Bump Elliott will take a
44-player squad with him to Pasa-
dena, tentatively including line-
backer Barry Dehlin and defen-
sive guard Rich Hahn, both of
whom suffered knee injuries
against ".Purdue and missed the
last five games of the season.
The team will practice in Yost
Field House or outdoors for a
while before leaving for Pasadena
on December 20. Regular twice-
daily sessions are scheduled on the
coast until a day or two before the
team meets Oregon State on New
Year's Day.

Y i
J '
6 .
s
7

TACKLES

Bailey, Don .................. 5-11 195
Haverstock, Tom .............6-3 235
Kines, Charles ................ 6-0 230
Mack, Tom................... 6-3 220
Mader, Gerry.:...... ..........6-3 225
Ruzicka, Chuck ...............6-1 235
Yearby, Bill .................. 6-3 230

LEFT HALFBACKS
So. Detwiler, Jim .................6-3
Jr. Lee, Louis .................... 6-2
Jr.
Jr. Sygar, Rick..................5-11
Sr. Rick....................6-3
Jr. RIGHT HALFBACKS
Jr.
Bass, Mike .................... 6-0
Rindfuss, Dick..............6-0
Ward, Carl .................... 5-9
Sr. Wells, Dick ...................5-9
cu

.1

212
190
185
200

So.
So.
So.
So.

'02, '-48, '51 . . .
ost Crisler.
tLead Rose

175 So.

GUARDS

190
185
175

Sr.
So.
Jr.

-Daily-Jim Lines
ATHLETIC DIRECTOR H. O. (Fritz) Crisler and Coach Bump
Elliott confer before a practice session at Ferry Field. Elliott, who
Crisler called "the greatest right halfback I ever saw or coached,"
has developed a Big Ten championship team in his sixth season
as head coach.

Butler, Dave ............. . .
Flanagan, Dennis ...........
Hahn, Rich ..................
Keating, Bill .................
Marcum, John ................
Mielke, Bob ..................
Simkus, Arnie ................

6-1
6-2
6-0,
6-2
6-0
6-1
6-4

225
220
205
230
210
205
230

SO.
Sr.
Jr.
Sr.
So.
Sr.

FUJLLBACKS

Anthony, Mel ................6-0
Dehlin, Barry ................ 5-11
Fisher, Dave .................5-10
Schick, Gary .................. 6-2

210
200
215
210

Sr.
Jr.
So.
Jr.

M

Ea

s reet Victoi
By LLOYD GRAFF
"Nothing great was ever achieved without enthusiasm," hath said
Emerson.
Although Ralph Waldo was not exactly a sports fan, were he liv-
ing today even .he would agree that Michigan has enthusiasm about
the Rose Bowl.
The wave of popular support rose with each Michigan victory,
ebbing only slightly after the Purdue mishap. After the Iowa game it
became clear that the Maize and Blue had a shot at the Big Ten
championship and the west coast junket. Just the Big Bad Buckeyes
stood in the way.
All spirit was transformed into hatred of Ohio State, with Woody
Hayes pictured as evil incarnate. The Wolverine's ally at the tele-
scope, Dr. Hazel Losh and the official Michigan pep peddler Wally
Weber led a throng of 4000 leather-lunged fans in cheering the team
at a diag pep rally.
An estimated 9000 fans journeyed to Columbus for the climactic
struggle played in numbing cold. While they were rewarded for their
ordeal by weather with victory, their compatriots in Ann Arbor who

ries witEnth

By JIM LaSOVAGE
Three Michigan coaches, Fielding H. (Hurry-Up) Yost, Herbert
Orrin (Fritz) Crisler, and Bennie Oosterbaan, have thus far led
Wolverine grid teams to the post-season spectacle in Pasadena.
Combined, their teams have racked up a victory margin of 112-6
over Pacific Coast Conference challengers.
That's quite a respectable walloping when one considers that the
feat of scoring 17 touchdowns and limiting the foe to one was per-
formed against the "best" team, in the West each year.
That wonderful year-1902-marked the first of the New Year's
Day gridiron classics ever to be played, and it will, because it was the
first, probably be the longest re-
membered. James Wagner, the
"muttonhead manager" of the
U 6"11 Sfirst Rose Bowl, h ad invited
M Michigan to play Stanford, al-
hmostf observers
sidered the football portion of the
Tournament of Roses a folly.
I Wagner's first choice would
havegbeen thesCalifornia Bears,
who had just completed an unde-
feated season. But the Bears had
cold feet, and the bid went to the
Cardinals, as the Stanfordites
were then known.
Only by Two
Stanford had been beaten only
by California, and by only a 2-0
margin. The Cardinals' overall rec-
ord was 3-1-2. However, four of
these six games were played
against two makeshift outfits
named the Olympic Club and Re-
liance.
Against each team, the Cardi-
nals managed a victory and a tie.
The only legitimate college team
they beat was Nevada, by their
largest victory margin (12-0), and

Kicking Treasure
Kemp turned out to be the ob-
ject ofrElliott's search for a punt-
er to replace O'Donnell. The Mich-
igan soph toed 42 boots, sailin-
over 36 yards a kick, with an
abundant number of them find-
ing the out of bounds marker at
the enemy ten-yard line.
The Wolverines found an an-
swer to a much-needed speed de-
ficiency in the person of sopho-
more halfback Carl Ward, who
hurdled, dashed and otherwise ad-
vanced forward for an average of
4.7 yards a carry during the sea-
son.
Detwiler, listed as third string
left halfback two weeks before
the first game, got the starting
nod after injuries to Jack Clancy
and John Rowser left the slot
vacant, and then plowed off the
right side of the line for 72 yards
against the Air Force at a 6.5'per
carry clip. Michigan won it sans
sweat, 24-7.
Staubach Scuttled
Detwiler chalked up 77 yards
on 11 carries the next week as the
Blue sunk the Navy, 21-0, putting
a stopper on Heisman Trophy
winner Staubach.
Timberlake out-passed Stau-
bach, out-booted Michigan State's
barefooted kicker Dick Kenney,
outran Illinois' all-America line-
backer Dick Butkus, and out-
scored anyone else in the Big Ten.
He finished with eight touch-
downs, 20 extra points, four field
goals, and an all-America quarter-
hack herth

mummemmen

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