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December 05, 1964 - Image 6

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The Michigan Daily, 1964-12-05

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PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 5 ,1964

PAGE SIX TUE 1~IICIIJGAN DAIlY SATURDAY, DECEMBER 5.1964

YEARBY NAMED TO 2ND TEAM:
Timberlake Earns All-American Honors

Cagers Seek Revenge at Duke

4

I

By The Associated Press
Bob Timberlake, John, Huarte,
Donny Anderson, and Gale Sayers
comprise the offensive backfield
of the 1964 Associated Press All-
America football team named yes-
terday.
Michigan tackle Bill Yearby was
named to the defensive squad of
the AP's second team.
Six other Michigan players -
linebacker Tom Cecchini, fullback
Mel Anthony, halfback Carl Ward,
defensive safety Dick Rindfuss,
end Jim Conley, and guard John
Marcum - all earned honorable
mention.
Illinois linebacker Dick Butkus
heads a first team defense aver-
aging 219 pounds per man on the
squad which reflects the wholesale
revival of a platoon game this sea-
son.
Separate Units
For the first time since 1952 sep-
arate units, a 22-man first team,
has been selected on the recom-
mendations of the sportswriters
and broadcasters who made up the

eight regional boards. All games
through Nov. 28 were taken into
account.
Timberlake quarterbacked Mich-
igan to the Big Ten title and a
Rose Bowl berth but his prowess
as a runner got him elected at a
halfback slot in the conference.
The 6-foot-4 senior rushed for 574
yards, passed for 807 and scored 80
points.
Huarte, Heisman Trophy winner
as college player of the year, was
the quarterback who changed No-
tre Dame from a 2-7 to a 9-1 per-
former and left a flock of school
records in his wake. His most not-
able season marks are 2,069 yards
in total offense and 114 pass com-
pletions for 2,062 yards and 16,
touchdowns.
Key to Offense
"We built our whole offense
around Huarte," says Coach Ara
Parseghian. "I've lived in constant
dread of what we would do if
something happened to him."
By means of pass receptions and
kick runbacks as well as sprints
from scrimmage junior Anderson

from Texas Tech-a first round
futures pick in both pro drafts-
accounted for 1,710 yards. He also
punts.
Kansas' Sayers, the whirlwind
of the plains, is one of the most
exciting runners in Big Eight his-
tory and leaves a league career
rushing record of 2,675 yards be-
hind him.
Close Contest
The closest of some hectic posi-.
tiori contests on offense was at
end where Florida State's Fred
Biletnikoff and Baylor's Lawrencej
Elkins got the nod over Jack Snow
of Notre Dame and Karl Noonan
01F T--

By GIL SAMBERG But if it will be hot in the
BACKS-Jerry Rhome, Tulsa; Craig stands, it will be even hotter under
Morton, California; Bob Berry, Ore- Looking back to the days when the boards.
gon; Bob Schweickert, Virginia Tech. Art Heyman ruled the courts in!Whtiexcedsago,
DEFENSE Durham, and the rivalry between What is expected is a good,
ENDS - Jack Jacobson, Oklahoma Duke's Blue Devils and the Tar boar when Came Bill, Ohe
State; Bill Cronin, Boston College. Hel f ot arlntuhdboards when Cazzie, Bill, Ollie,
Stae;Bil roin Boto Cllge iHeels of North Carolina touched and Trigger lock horns with
TACKLES - BILL YEARBY, MICHI- off riots in that fine southern Duke's front line of Hack Tison,
GAN; John Frick, Ohio University. city, the odds are that the Wolver-
LINEBACKERS-Glen Ressler, Penn Jack Marin, and soph Bob Reidy
State; Marty Schottenheimer, Pitt; Carl ines will get some added competi- for possession of anything in the
McAdams, Oklahoma. tion tonight from the fans. air. Tison, a 6-10 center, is flank-
BACKS-Tom Nowatzke, Indiana; Ken Michigan, rated the strongest ed by the two 6-6 forwards with
Hatfield, Arkansas; Bruce Bennett, basketball team in the nation, the troika averaging close to 210
B oFENSE Fr should not expect- to be greeted pounds. If any of them should
ENDS-Fred Biletnikoff, Florida State, by enthusiastic cheers when they fail, 210-pound Brian Kitching is
6-1, 192, Sr.; Lawrence Elkins, Baylor, invade Duke's hallowed grounds. sure to see action.
6-2, 187, Sr. The enthusiasm of a home crowd However, the depth of Duke's
TACKLES-Jim Wilson, Georgia, 6-3, may be a factor in closing the men up front doesn't go far be-
235, Sr. gap between two teams rated a yond that.

unchanged. We'll attempt again to
play fast, exciting basketball with
a tough defense.-
"But," he adds, "this team will
have to work harder on the funda-
mentals of the game than any
team we have had for the past
several years."
Sharp Passing
Bubas has been grooming top
flight teans at Duke for the past
five years, and this season's start-
ers should prove no different.
Their basic game should be ball
control, using slick, polished pass-
ing to set up shots. Tison, playing
more towards the head of the key,
will be an important link in this
strategy.
The Wolverines are still faced

with making a final decision on
who will take over the guard spot
vacated by Bob Cantrell. With
four possibles in Tom Ludwig,
John Thompson, George Pomey,
and John Clawson still in the run-
ning, there will have to be some
experimentation along the way
to the Big Ten season's opener
with Illinois in January.
But Coach Dave Strack has
often stated his opinion that the
whole pre-conference schedule is
more or less a warm-up and con-
ditioning period for the later im-
portant games. It is likely that
we will see, or rather hear, some
of the expected rotation at guard,
as well as other positions, even in
the important clash tonight.

I

wGUARDS-Tom Nobis, Texas, 6-2, 215,
Linebackers Jr.; Bill Fisk, Southern California, 6-0,
Teamed with Butkus in the 1 200. Sr.
Teghlym-cdmptithiBeksin thke- CENTER-Pat Killorin, Syracuse, 6-2,
highly - competitive linebacker- 225, Jr.
guard spots are Tennessee's Steve BACKS-John Huarte, Notre Dame,
DeLong and Pat Caveness of Ar- 6-0, 180, Sr.; BOB TIMBERLAKE, MICH-
kansas. The trio shaded Marty IGAN, 6-4, 215, Sr.; Gale Sayers. Kan-
Schoteneime ofPitt Pen isas, .16- 195. Sr.; Donny Anderson,
I Schottenheimer of Pitt, Penn Texas Tech, 6-3, 207.
State's Glen Ressler and Carl Mc- DEFENSE
Adams of Oklahoma. j ENDS-HaroldWells, Purdue, 6-2,
The 1964 Associated Press All- 213, Sr.; Allen Brown, Mississippi, 6-4,
America football team: 226, Sr.; John Van Sicklen, Iowa State,
SECOND TEAM 5-11, 217, Sr.
OFFENSE LINEBACKERS-Dick Butkus, Ili-
ENDS - Jack Snow, Notre Dame; nois, 6-3, 243, Sr.; Steve DeLong, Ten-
Karl Noonan, Iowa. nessee, 6-3, 243 Sr.; Ron Caveness
TACKLES - Rich Koeper, Oregon Arkansas, 6-1, 215, Sr.
State; Jerry Rush, Michigan State. BACKS - Tucker Frederickson, Au-
GUARDS-Wayne Freeman, Alabama; burn, 6-2, 210, Sr.; Clarence Williams'
Jack Abendschan, New Mexico. Washington State, 6-2, 196, Sr.; Arnold
CENTER-Richard Granier, Louisiana Chonko, Ohio State, 6-2, 208, Sr.; Cos-
State, mo Iacavazzi, Princeton, 5-11, 200, Sr.

mere four places apart.
The meeting, to be broadcast on
WAAM in Ann Arbor at 8:15, is
an extremely early test for both
Michigan and fifth ranked Duke.
New Rivalry
Although the two teams will not
be at top mid-season form for the
contest, the newly started series
between them has already sprout-
ed into a tough rivalry, and an
all-out effort by both teams is to
be expected. Last year's defeat at
the hands of the Blue Devils at
Kansas City knocked the Wolver-
ines out of the NCAA champion-
ship battle, and almost the entire
squad which suffered that defeat
is back in hopes of returning the
compliment.

Vacendak Out
At the guard spots will be Cap-
tain Denny Ferguson, a returnee,
and Bob Verga, a sophomore who
averaged 33 points per game last
year. It seems strange that Steve
Vacendak, named the Most Valu-
able Player in last year's NCAA
regionals, and the guard who
Coach Vic Bubas picked as most
likely to follow Art Heyman and
Jeff Mullins as an All-America,
is on the bench. It could be the
new-found strength at guard in
Verga.
"Our lack of depth in the front
court may be a problem before the
year is over," says Bubas. "We
have adequate depth in the back
court. Our style of play will be

TEMPERATURE

WEATHER I DEPENDABLE 'M' Tankers Enter Sto
IMPORT SERVICE
By JIM LaSOVAGE including freshmen who cannot
' We have the MECHANICS . . . compete in regular season meets,
and the PARTS. An optimistic Michigan swim- the opportunity to compete
ming squad, including 23 varsity against swimmers of his own cali-
NEW CAR DEALER and 18 freshman swimmers, opens ber. Proof of this last year was
a new season today i East Lan- seen when a swimmer from Jack-
- Triumph- V OIO-- sing, as seven schools meet in the son JC finished sixth in the finals
Every 15 Minutes - second annual Michigan College of one of the events. His coach
Fiat-Checker Swimming and Diving Meet. commented that that race alone
Starting as an experimentalt made the meet worthwhile.
meee in Ann Arbor last year, the - Competition is expected to be
SHERB ESTES meet was so successful in the eyes roughest between tankers of the
of Stager and Michigan -State two Big Ten foes. In the free-
AUT OMA RT coach Charles McCaffree that it style sprints the Wolverine nata-
was decided to have a repeat per- tors have five likely prospects
050 319 W. Huron ' formance this year. Team scores while the Spartans have three. For
665-3688 are not kept in the meet which the Maize and Blue, Bill Groft,
stages 15 events rather than the Bob Hoag, Howard Brundage, Bob
usual dual meet total of 11. Tanner and Big Ten champion
Besides the Wolverines and Rich Walls will be vying for the
MSU, teams from Western Michi- top spot. State challenges with
gan, Jackson Junior College, Flint Darryl Kifer, Jim McMillan, and
' k ''Community College, Henry Ford Ken Walsh. Pool records at MSU's
Community College of Dearborn, Intramural Pool could be broken
and Grand Rapids Junior College in this competition.
f will participate. In all, 137 varsity Two Olympians
and frosh swimmers and diverse The Wolverines boast two mein-
- will enter the competition. bers who competed in the 1964
Stager is enthusiastic about the Olympics in Tokyo-Carl Robie
meet because it gives everyone, and Bill Farley. Farley snatched:
-}f
~GIFT 1EAS
1. CHRISTIAN DIOR Turtlenecks and
gloves . . . $12.00-$15.00
2. MEISTER SKI SWEATERS ... $22.50-$35.00
3. SKI SKETCH PANTS, McGreggor and
White Stag . . . $20.00';::
I 4. SKI PARKAS by Roffe, Hauser, Sport-Obermeyer
and McGreggor .. . $20.00-$40.00
Tom Jones and Fanny Hill were only two of the many
18th-century fictional characters who had trouble
maintaining their virtue in a world that, it would
seem, couldn't care less. At one time or another, most
of the period's leading writers were preoccupied with
1 Mile South of Campus the problem, and none more so than Daniel Defoe.
After getting Robinson Crusoe out of his system, he in-
t '° ''=" mm m m m mm "troduced Moll Flanders and, in 1724, a lovely young
* - -.

ite Meet
fourth place in the 1500 -meter
freestyle distance race, and Robie
picked up a silver medal in the
200-meter butterfly event. State's
Jerry Dilly duplicated Robie's ac-
complishment by walking off with
second in the backstroke. How-
ever, as these three could not
enter school for the present
semester, none will be eligible for
today's meet.
Freshmen
Watching the freshmen will
also provide some interest in the
meet. Stager says that Michigan's
crop is developing much better
than he had expected. One in par-
ticular to observe will be Ken.
Wiebeck, an all-around swimmer
who excels in every stroke.
Preliminaries will be staged at
11 a.m. with the finals beginning
at 1 p.m. This will be Michigan's
only competition until the dual
meet season opens next January.
The Wolverines' opener in the Big
Ten will be against Wisconsin at
home on January 8.
* * *
Contrary to a statement made
in yesterday's Daily, Steve Rabin-
ovitch and Geoff D'Atri are no

BRIAN KITCHING JACK'MARIN
SPORT SHORTS:
Illinois Beats UCLA;
Dodgers .Deal Howard

longer on

this year's squad.

Rabinovitch is no longer enrolled
in the Univrsity and D'Atri re-
cently dropped off the team.
NBA Standings
EASTERN DIVISION
i L Pct. GB
x-Boson 185 .783 -

By The Associated Press
CHAMPAIGN - Shooting a
torrid .605 from the field, Illinois
ruined the debut of UCLA's NCAA
basketball champions with a 110-
83 victory last night.
The veteran Illini team, paced
by six men in double figures,
moved to a 52-38 halftime lead
and never allowed the Bruins to
get within range.
Hitting on 46 of 76 shots from
the field to establish a school
record, the Illini were led by
Skip Thoren's 20 points. Bill Mc-
Keown added 19 while Bogie Red-
mond and Don Freeman contri-
buted 17 points each.
Gail Goodrich led UCLA with
,25 points but the closest the
Bruins could come was within 11
points midway in the second half
when Illinois' lead was chopped
to an 80-69 advantage. The Illini,
however, put together another
heat of steam and moved out of
of range.
HOUSTON -The Los Angeles
Dodgers traded four players, in-
cluding towering Frank Howard,
to the Washington Senators yes-
terday for pitcher John Kennedy
and $100,000.
Besides Howard, the biggest man
in baseball, the Senators got pitch-
ers Phil Ortega and Pete Richert
and infielder-outfielder Ken Mc-
Mullen.
It was the 10th trade of the busy,
winter meetings.
Earlier in the day, the Los An-
geles Angels of the American
L e a g u e unloaded controversial
pitcher Bo Belinski to the fast-
changing Philadelphia Phillies of
the National League for rookies
Costen Shockley, a first baseman,
and Rudy May, a pitcher.

Cincinnati
Philadelphia
New York
WESTERN
Los Angeles
St .Louis
Baltimore
Detroit
x-San Francisco
x--Incomplete.

15 10 .600 4
12 11 .522 6
5 15 .250 11x/
DIVISION
15 8 .652 -
12 19 .545 2 f
12 12 .500 3x/
8 16 .333 7 f
7 17 .292 8x

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Philadelphia 119, Detroit 106
Cincinnati 104, Los Angeles 90
Baltimore 108, St. Louis 106
Boston at San Francisco (ic)
TODAY'S GAMES
Baltimore vs. Phila. at Detroit
New York at Detroit
Boston at San Francisco
TOMORROW'S GAMES
Baltimore at Cincinnati
New York at St. Louis
Philadelphia at Los Angeles

And the Minnesota Twins of the
American L e a g u e exchanged
southpaw pitched Gerry Arrigo to
the Cincinnati Reds of the Na-
tional League for infielder-out-
fielder Cesar Tovar.
Howard, 28, batted .225 last
season, hit 24 homers and drove in
69 runs. He was National League
Rookie of the Year in 1960. He had
his best season in 1962 when he
batted .296, hit 21 homers and
knocked in 119 runs.
Ortega, a 25-year-old right-
hander, was 7-9 last season. Ri-
chert, a southpaw who also is 25,
was 2-3 in Los Angeles and 7-8
with Spokane of the Pacific Coast
League.
McMullen batted .234 for the
Dodgers, hit 14 homers and had 49
RBIs. He can play third base, first
base or outfield.
Paddleball
Tourney Here
Michigan will play host today
in a pentagular intra-state col-
legiate paddleball tournament -
the first of its kind-at the I-M
courts beginning at 11 a.m.
The participants will be Mich-
igan, Michigan State, Central
Michigan, Eastern Michigan, and
Western Michigan.
Each school will enter a No. 1
and No. 2 singles player plus a
doubles team, and one point will
be awarded to the winner of each
match. A team champion and in-
dividual champions in each divi-
sion will be recognized.
Each school will also furnish a
faculty doubles team.
For Michigan, the entrants are
George Skaff and Dan Milgram
in the singles brackets and Jack
Berman and Tom Silfen in
doubles. Representing the faculty
are Andy Kozar and Guy Reiff,
both of the Physical Education
Dept.
Christmas
Special
1 Hr. Kleen King
1226 PACKARD
Corner of Woodlawn
Hours: 9-6 Mon.-Fri.
9-5 Sat.
49c
TROUSERS
WOOL SHI RTS
SKIRTS
SWEATERS
SILK BLOUSES
SPORT JACKETS

"can IBM If
use my Idas? "
IBM's computers must solve many kinds of
problems. Your ideas can contribute now to
new methods and new computer systems.
What you'll need: intellectual curiosity, the
will to stick to a problem, competence in your
field.
If you are earning a degree in engineering, the
sciences, mathematics, or business adminis-
tration, see IBM. You might work in Research,
Development, Manufacturing, Programming,
or Marketing.
Ask your college placement office for our bro-
chures and an appointment with the IBM in-
terviewers. Or write directly to Manager of
College Relations, Dept. 882, IBM Corporate
Headquarters, Armonk, New York 10504. IBM
is an Equal Opportunity Employer.
Interviews February 8, 9

I

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A
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Chan Stick'ao a/ona !

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