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December 05, 1964 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1964-12-05

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, DECE31BER 5, 1964

AGE00W IdMCIGNDIL ATRAYPEEME 516

'U' TRADITION:
Choral Union To Give 'Messiah

By CAROL EIFRIG
The Christmas season of 1879
"witnessed the initial performance
of the University Choral Union,
a performance which included a
selection from Handel's "Messiah."
Since that time the famed ora-
torio has become a part of Uni-
versity tradition. The Choral Un-
ion will present the work in its
entirety at 8:30 p.m. today and
at 2:30 p.m. tomorrow in Hill
Aud.
In celebration of the Musical
Solciety's 86th anniversary, the
Choral Union will join with the
University Symphony Orchestra
and four' professional soloists -
Helen Boatwright, soprano; Jean
Sanders, contralto; Charles Bress-
ler, tenor; Howard Nelson, bass.
One of Oldest Choruses E
"The Choral Union is one of
the oldest continuous choruses in
America," Lester McCoy, the
group's conductor, said, "How-
ever, the organization of the chor-s
us has not changed much since
its first appearance in the win-
ter of 1879-80."
"The Choral Union is still the
performing nucleus of the spon-
soring Musical Society," he added.
"Established on the principle of
bringing the highest quality mu-
sic to the public, the Choral Un-
ion has never lowered this stand-
ard."
Gradual Turnover
This stability of organization
and tradition is due, in part, to
the very low leadership turnover
of the Musical Society. There have
been only six conductors in the
history of the Choral Union. Mc-
Coy is the present musical direc-
tor and has held this post since
1947.
Moreover, since the administra-
tion of the Choral Union's first

'U' Counseling Provides ACROSS0
Educational Experience Bak(
(Continued from Page 1) Anderson notes the unique char- Prof. Burton L
drop courses and accept or reject acter of the University's program University's Canc
choices of concentration, after of faculty counseling: "Few per- stitute has summ
reviewing necessary credentials sons realize that the program used of the Institute f
and requirements, here is not the universal method ing Aug. 31, 1964
and requiremt used in most colleges and univer-
Ultimatum! sities. A majority of other in- Supported by
These advisors, in concert with stitutions hire professionals for available by the
the counseling deans, possess the their counselingrprograms," he of the American
ultimatum power over student re- discloses. and by the Mich
quests, and entertain Jurisdiction "A the American Ca
nv~ a.hra.8a~ra~ ofnettins. "Aproblem regarding t h e I nfktheAmin3C

Er Sums Up Institute Year
. Baker of the lecture in this series is planned whom it found jobs were placed
er Research In- for the sping of 1965. with the state of Michigan.
ed up the efforts The Cancer Research Commit- A breakdown shows that: out
or the year end- tee also furnished 13 grants to of 69 school system superinten-
i; permit faculty members and dents who were aided in finding

CAMPUS:

funds made
national office
Cancer Society
igan Division of
ncer Society, the
n hae. tre ,, 'v.4-

graduate students to attend con- positions, 60 were in Michigan;
ferences and symposia concerned 22 out of 23 assistant principals
with growth problems. The insti- placed stayed within the state;
tute allocated in excess of $100,- 56 out of 64 secondary school prin-
000 during the year for grants, cipals remained here: and 42 out
fellowships, seminars and lee- of 47 elementary principals were
tures. placed in Michigan.

Lester McCoy, conductor4

president, Harvey Simmons Frie
professor of language in 18
there have been only three pre
dents.
Charles A. Sink, now presid
of the board of the Musical '
ciety, administered the affairs
the Choral Union from 1927-19
when the present executive dir
tor, Gail W. Rector, began th
duties.
Describes Changes
"Of course, there have be
some changes in the Choral U
ion since its beginning," McC
said.
"The membership of the ch
us, for instance, has grown fr
a comparatively few Ann Ar
and faculty church members
1879 to over 300 persons tod
Then, too, the Choral Union or

over a r Kfy lu .
This "power of the signature,"
in the University's view, is merely
a manifestation of operational
necessities, and certainly does not
represent the primary function for
which counseling is established.
According to Manning, the un-
derlying aim of the program has'
little to do with these structural
procedures, and instead focuses
on the development of a mean-
ingful counselor-student relation-!
':; :: : ship.
Monolithic Structure
Finally, concerning criticism of
of the University Musical Society the "impersonality" of the coun-
seling program, Manning says "the
eze, inally had its own orchestra; now counseling service is not totally
79, we perform in conjunction with monolithic in structure; we are
esi- the University Symphony Orches- directly concerned with student1
tra," he said. needs and ambitions.
ent Adding a final professional "Perhaps the best means of
So- touch, the chorus has been im- justifying this belief," Manning'
of porting renowned soloists in re- notes, "is to examine the true in-
57, cent years. terest and devotion which so many
ec- Expands Activities of our counselors demonstrate."
ese Finally, the development of Assistant Dean George R. An-
the Choral Union has culminated derson of the literary college, di-
in the expansion of its musical rector of the Freshman-Sopho-
een activities. Since 1894, the chorus more Counseling Office, likewise
Jn- has appeared annually in the May stresses the competence of the
'oy Festival, which has resulted in the program's personnel.
performances of secular as well as Active Members
or- religious music. "The use of faculty representa-
om "However, the Christmas pro- tives as advisors is one of the
bor gram is probably still the favor- greatest strengths of our system,"
in ite of the public," McCoy said. Anderson says. "Most advisors are
ay. "We present the 'Messiah' largely active members of the teaching
'ig- as a gift to the town." staff, and bcan understand the
________ types of problems students face
in their various fields.''
Counselors spend one-third of
their work-time in counseling and
the remainder in their respective
)n N ew College departments, according to Ander-
son.
Contrary to some opinions, An-
ind and leadership qualities of stu- derson emphasizes the quality of
a dents who lack some of the sian- individual members of the staff.
ial dard skills. "Several have received distinguish-
ies, * * * ed service awards from the Uni-

USNSA Seeks Candidates
For Model UN Conference

choice of faculty counselors over
professionals is that of expense,"
Anderson notes. "Although fac-
ulty advisors are decidely more
expensive, the University is willing
to pay this excess for what it
deems to be a qualitative ad-
vantage."
Total cost for the overall
counseling program is approxi-
mately $400,000 a year, according
to Anderson.

lns uue maa ju researen granu
allocations to University faculty
members, awarded five fellow-
ships, conducted four seminars
with outside speakers and held its
10th annual Cancer Retreat.
In addition, a lecture series was
established in honor of Donald
E. Johnson of Flint in recognition
of his continuing interest in and
support of the University's efforts
in the area of cancer. The second

* * *
More than 600 practicing den-
tists from Michigan, nearby states,'
and Canada are expected to par-
ticipate in 57 postgraduate
courses being offered this year by
dentistry school.
Most of the courses are inten-
sive reviews lasting from two
days to two weeks. They cover
modern developments in 29 sep-
arate fields of dentistry. The
courses are arranged by the W. K.,
Kellogg Foundation Institute of;
Dentistry.
The University received grants
totaling $563,000 from the De-
partment of Health, Education,l
and Welfare during the period
Sept. 1-Nov. 1.
The 17 grants, given by the
Public Health Service of HEW,
were part of a year-round pro-
gram of research grants to the
University by the Washington of-
fice.
* * *
The University Placement Bu-
reau reports that 180 out of the
203 school administrators for

SATURDAY, DEC. 5
7 p.m. and 9 p.m. - Cinema
Guild will present "Los Olvidados"
in Architecture Aud.
8 p.m.-University Players pre-
sents Carl Oglesby's "The Peace-
maker" in Trueblood Aud.
8:30 p.m. - A concert of elec-
tronic music will be presented by
the School of Music in the School
of Music Recital Hall.
8:30 p.m.-The University Mu-
sical Society will present the
"Messiah" in Hill Aud. The Uni-
versity Choral Union, conducted
by Lester McCoy, will be accom-
panied by the University Sym-
phony Orchestra in the perform-
ance.
SUNDAY, DEC. 6
2:30 p.m.-The University Mu-
sical Society will present Handel's
"Messiah." The University Chor-
al Union, conducted by Lester Mc-
Coy, and the University Symphony
Orchestra will take part in the
program.
7 p.m. and 9 p.m. - Cinema
Guild will present "Los Olvidados"
in Architecture Aud.

By MARK GUDWINt
The United States National
Student Association Committee of
Student Government Council is
looking for students to partici-
pate in the 19th Annual North-
Central Model United Nations.
The program will be held at the
University of Minnesota April 8-
11.
Those interested are requested
to apply by leaving their name,
address and telephone number at
the USNSA box in the Student
Activities Bldg. Plans have not
yet been completed as to the fi-
nances or to the country that the
University delegation will repre-
sent.
The delegations will be advised
by people from the countries they
represent. At the first bloc meet-
ings, delegations are expected to
submit position papers about var-
ious problems that are facing the
individual countries or blocs.
Current Topics
Topics of current interest are
to be discussed at the Model Unit-
ed Nations. The Security Council
is expected to discuss the present

situations in Viet Nam and Cy-
prus.
The Economic and Social Coun-
cil will consider the role of the
United Nations in world education
and in population problems.
Issues to be discussed in the
General Assembly political com-
mittees include admission of Red
China to the UN, payment of dues,
reunification of Germany, and nu-
clear weapons.
The Trusteeship Council will
handle the problem of the Portu-
gese African Territories and the
world refugee problem.
Sponsored by CCUN
The North-Central Model Con-
ference is sponsored by the North
Central Regional Division of the
Collegiate Council for the United
Nations. CCUN was founded in
1946 by the First Intercollegiate
Institute on the United Nations.
Invitations were extended to
every university in the United
States. At the first conference, 66
students representing 38 universi-
ties attended. Members met infor-
mally with delegations from the
United Nations and with members
of the UN Secretariat.

vlDwdFw4mrmwmmpw4m

NOW j

DIAL
8-6416

COLLEGE ROUNDUP:
Wayne Faculty Divided

r "BR ILLIANTI HILARIOUSI
GAGS. GIGGLES, GUFFAWS AND SATIRI."
The New York Times:
Pietro Germris
SEDUCED and
A WALTER READE STERLING PRESENTATION
Continuous from 1 o'cloc'k Saturday and Sunday

By MERLE JACOB
DETROIT-Wayne State Uni-
versity's Liberal Arts faculty voic-
ed mixed reaction to President
Clarence Hilberry's proposal to
create a College of Creative Arts.
Hilberry's proposal calls for the
creation of a new instructional
unit and the reorganization of
present programs. The budget of
the new college would be formed
from the present budgets of the
units transfered to the college.
The majority of liberal arts de-
partment chairmen called for
further information on President
tilberry's proposal before discuss-
ing the relative merits of a new
college.
CHAPEL HILL - Students at
the University of North Carolina
voted "Yes" on the National Stu-
dent Association by a 2,966 to
2,471 margin in a campus-wide
referendum here last week.
The favorable verdict for NSA
ended a bitter two-week campaign
that pitted student body President
Bob Speadman's "Carolina Stu-
dents for USNSA" against a well
organized anti-NSA group led by
Bayard Harris and Nelson Schwab,
two members of the Men's Honor
Council.
DETROIT-Charles Grosberg,
Detroit businessman and philan-
thropist, presented Wayne State
University with $175,000 to be
used in building a campus re-
ligious center. The center which
will serve as a headquarters for
their university religious groups
will be known as the Charles
Grosberg Religious Center. The
Grosberg gift will be used for the
construction of a common library-
reading lounge, seminar classroom
and a meditation room. The build-
ing is being financed by the dif-
ferent religious groups and private
donations.
YELLOW SPRINGS, Ohio-An-
tioch College faculty approved
plans for an experimental first-
year program for freshman which
if approved by the administration
will go into effect in the fall
quarter of 1965. The program
calls for a radical departure from
the present first year studies. It
proposes that course grades, be
replaced by individual evaluation
sheets by teachers; that the stu-
dent plan, execute, and evaluate
his education with a preceptor;
that upperclassmen have com-
DIXIELAND
OLD HEIDELBERG
TONIGHT

bined roles of hall adviser a
teaching assistant and that
core program dealing with s.
and physical sciences, humanit
community and extramural m
ters be established.
The preceptor would be a f
ulty member who would w
closely with the student in pla
ning his first year's activit
Students who transfer out of A
tioch after the first year wo
be granted 32 credits automatic
ly by the Registrar since gra
will not be used in the evaluati
The new program is expec
to mesh with Antioch's new pl
to find talented Negro stude
and help them qualify for colle
The new first year will allowt
college to judge the intellige

at-
ac-
ork
an-
ies.
An-
uld
cal-
des
on.
ted
ans
nts
ege.
the
nee

DENVER - The presidents of
Colorado's eight colleges and uni-
versities and Gov. John Love pre-
sented a blueprint for higher edu-
cation which included a Denver
Metropolitan College and a state-
wide junior college system with
three new junior colleges. The
Denverncollege is to establish the
first two years of study by 1965
and would later be converted to
a four year college. The junior
colleges are to be in El Paso
county, Denver, and the Boulder-
Larime-Weld county area. A co-
ordinating council for higher edu-
cation was also proposed by the
group.

versity, and not a few are chair-
men of departments."

I

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THE IDEAL GIFT
FOR CHRISTMAS
SA GLEE CLUB RECORD
Christmas Sales Begin
December 7th
In the Fishbowl
8 A.M.-4 P.M.

l

E

!I

DIAL 5-6290
Shown Today
at 7 and 9 P.M.
Only

NOTE
___________________ This Show
Will Not
Play Matinees
some Saturday or
women Sunday
can't help
themselves ...

THE GRAND RAPIDS CAMERA CLUB

I

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mere would always be men in her life...
all kinds of men...and always Philip to
come back to...to degrade and despise.

presents a
ROSE BOWL COLORAMA TOUR
for its members
Leave-WEDNESDAY, DEC. 30 from
Grand Rapids Kent County Airport

I

GYPSY

I

..... . . . . . .

TOUR INCLUDES:
* Five nights at the STATLER-HILTON HOTEL in
Los Angeles (single room-$20.00 extra)
' A trip to fabulous "DISNEYLAND"
' Reserved seats at PARADE OF ROSES and a box lunch
* Tickets to the ROSE BOWL GAME
All transfers
Leave-JANUARY 4, 1965

I

I

I

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,I

r ya ! .. Q ..u~--- ' SINS

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