100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

December 04, 1964 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1964-12-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

:U' Growth: Expands the Status Quo

1964 Enrollment and Projected Increases
(Graduate Students Included)
Percent of Increase

By ROBERT rIPPLER
and WILLIAM BENOIT
While increasing in size be-
Whl nraigi ieb-,tween now and 1975, the Univer-
sityplans to maintain the status
quo in the characteristics of its
student body, the proportions of
its faculty and the emphases of
its operations, a report released
yesterday by the Office of Aca-
demic Affairs indicates.
Subject to review and evaluation
by the faculty and the adminis-
tration, the report charts "desired
growth"--i.e. increases commen-
surate with present facilities, ex-
pected funds and population pres-
sures - for all 17 University
schools.
Included in the report are plans
to maintain the following ratios
the same as at present in spite of
growth: in-state to out-state stu-
dents, students to faculty, grad-
uates to undergraduates. In ad-
dition, the report foresees neglig-
ible changes in the rate of re-
search to nonresearch operations.
Outlined
If the University achieves the
desired growth outlined in the
report total enrollment will jump
from the present level' of 29,103
to 41,797 in 1970 and 50,186 by
1975. That is a total increase
from 1964 to 1975 of 72 per cent.
The report noted that its esti-
mates -and projections may be al-
tered if Michigan follows through
with its plan to submit a joint
budget increase with other schools
in the near future.
However, in growing at this

rate, the University would merely
do its share in educating the
booming student population of
Michigan, the report's figures in-
dicate. Present University enroll-
ment equals 14.3 per cent of all
students enrolled in Michigan col-
leges and universities.
Projected figures indicate that
the 1975 enrollment will equal
13.9 per cent of all students en-
rolled in Michigan's colleges and
universities.
Present Levels
According to the report, the
University intends to maintain at
roughly present levels, at least
until 1975, three ratios:
--The ratio of in-state to out-
of-state students. The report lists
the maintenance of this ratio as
a "basic assumption." This year,
the student body is composed of
73 per cent "Michigandresidents
and 27 per cent nonresidents.
-The ratio of students to fac-
ulty. It is now one teacher for
every 14.8 students. By 1975, the
University expects it to be one
teacher for every 15.8 students.
-The ratio of graduates to un-
dergraduates. "According to pres-
ent conceptions, there will not be
a marked change in 'student
mix'," the report states. "Emphasis
will continue on the enrollment of
graduate and graduate-profession-
al students along with strong un-
dergraduate programs."
Review
A review of a breakdown of
projected enrollment increases in
schools and colleges shows a pro-
portionally much higher increase

for non-Ann Arbor University cen-
ters than for Ann Arbor proper
between now and 1975.
Ann Arbor enrollment is ex-
pected to rise from 26,050 to 42,-
471 (63 per cent) while enroll-
ment at Dearborn, Flint and
Graduate Study Centers is ex-
pected to rise from 3,053 to 7,-
715 (153 per cent).
The largest increase is slated
for the University Flint College,
an enrollment rise from the pres-
ent 636 to 4000 in 1975, over 500
per cent.
Second
The second largest increase is
for Dearborn, a jump from the
present 677 to 1900 in 1975, an in-
crease of 180 per cent.
The pharmacy college (97.9
per cent), the architecture and
design school (96.1 per cent) and
the nursing school (76.1 per cent)
have the three next largest ex-
pected increases. The expected in-
crease for the literary college
(from 12,927 to 19,796, or 53 per

cent) is 10 per cent below the 63
per cent anticipated increase by
1975 for the Ann Arbor campus as
a whole.
The report explains that the es-
tablishment of future residential
colleges may replace to an extent
growth in the literary college.
"The projected enrollment (of the
literary college) indicates the need
for growth in liberal arts. To the
extent that these can be met
via the residential colleges, growth
of the literary college can be pro-
portionately reduced."
Mention of the absolute im-
portance of state funds in carry-
ing out these growth plans is made
three times in the slim, 17-page
report. "If support (for expansion)
is not forthcoming, it will be nec-
essary for downward adjustments
to be made in the plans for
growth," the report emphasizes.
The report is the result of two
year's work by personnel of each
of the University's schools and col-
leges. President Harlan Hatcher

in the spring of 1962 asked each
of the schools and colleges to
describe its program and direction
of future growth.
Each unit was asked to indi-
cate its "desired enrollment" for
1970 and 1975-a figure taking
into account revenues anticipated,
present facilities and population,
pressures.
The reports of the schools were
submitted to the Advisory Council
on Academic Affairs-an advisory
gioup to Vice-President for Aca-
demic Affairs Roger W. Heyns
composed of deans, research direc-
tors, and Office of Academic Af-
fairs staff-and discussions of the
plans of each unit were held.
Further discussions on the plans
are yet to be held among facul-
ties of the schools and colleges
and University Senate commit-
tees. Final plans will be present-
ed to President Hatcher and his
staff for evaluation, revision and
eventual presentation to the Re-
gents.

1964 1970 1975

Architecture and Design
Business Administration
Dearborn
Dentistry
Education
Engineering
Flint
Law
L. S. & A.
Medicine
Music
Natural Resources
Nursing
Pharmacy
Public Health
Social Work
Unclassified-Graduate
Net Total excluding duplicates

844
1071
677
511
2814
4259
636
1075
12927
1573
770
287
760
192
331
409
69
29103

1484
1465
1364
708
4175
6153
3286
- 1321
16155
1625
1062
351
1152
298
371
520
307
41797

1655
1730
1900
870
5019
7100
4000-
1500
19796
1838
1265
400
1343
380
425
640
325
50186

1964
to
1970
75.8%
36.8
101.5
38.6
48.4
446
416.7
22.9
25.0
3.3
37.9
22.3
51.6
55.2
12.1
27.1-

1970
to
1975
11.5%
18.1
39.3
22.9
20.2
15.4
21.7
13.6
22.5
13.1
19.1
14.0
16.6
27.5
14.6
23.1

1964
to
1975
96.1%
61.5
180.6
70.3
78.4
66.7
528.9
39.5
53.1
16.8
64.3
39.4.
76.7
97.9
28.4
56.5

43.6% 20.1% 72.4%

Centers for Graduate study
Ann Arbor

1753
26050

2832
35551

3515
42471

Seventy-Four Years of Editorial Freedom

P3aji

VOL. LXXV, No. 79

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 4, 1964

SEVEN CENTS

EIGHT PAGES

EIGHT PAGES

NATO POW ERS: ti01
Wilson Asks 'Nuclear Cabinet' &

Arrest

LONDON {P) - Prime Minister chance to hear the views of his
Harold Wilson flies to Washington allies up to the moment, if it ever
Sunday with a plan for a per- comes, when he would have to
manent American-European cab- decide whether to trigger nuclear
inet to shape nuclear policy mak- war.
ing around the world. Wilson is expected to submit
Political aides reported Britain's this and other far-reaching pro-
Labor prime minister hopes such posals to President Lyndon B.
a group of allied countries, along- Johnson Monday and Tuesday
side the National Security Coun- when the two leaders discuss ways
cil in Washington, would supple- of ipproving the West's global
ment his project for an Atlantic military, political and economic
nuclear force. arrangements.
The cabinet, as the British see In outlining the Labor govern-
it, would consist of the ambassa- ment's approach to the Johnson
dors or special envoys of Britain, administration, Wilson's associates
West Germany, Italy, Holland or stressed he will not be advancing
some other small Atlantic Al- firm and inflexible proposition on
liance nation and France if Presi- a take-it-or-leave-it basis.
dent Charles de Gaulle or his suc- His intention is to offer an in-
cessor cared to joi. itiative which already, in its
It would have rights to consult sketcy details, seems to have been
with, and be consulted by, the accepted.
U.S. President or his delegates in Among Wilson's chief aims in
all emergencies inside and outside Washington are:
the NATO area. -He wants Johnson to aban-
The American chief executive don the American scheme for a
thus would reportedly have every multilateral nuclear force in its
Johnson Calls for Closer
Ties Am ong NATO Ns

present form. The force was to
consist of 25 surface ships armed
with Polaris rockets, manned by
mixed NATO crews and owned
jointly by the six or seven coun-
tries interested in it. Wilson sees
it as a $2 billion political gimmick
which might win the 1965 election
for West German Chancellor Lud-
wig Erhard but which might also
lose the chance of a disarmament
agreement with Russia.
-He wants Johnson instead to
accept his own plan for an At-
lantic nuclear force of perhaps
eight or ten ships. It also would
include all Britain's H-bombers
and three Polaris-firing nuclear
submarines this country is build-
ing. Wilson would abandon all
rights to withdraw Britain's nu-
clear strike-force except in the
event that NATO should collapse.
-Wilson would like the allies
to follow up any move creating a
force with an approach to the
Russians for an agreement in arms
control. He thinks agreements may
be possible to stop the spread of
nuclear weapons to countries
which do not now have them.
-He wants to switch the em-
phasis of Britain's overseas mili-
tary commitments from Europe to
points east of Suez and he thinks
U.S. Defense Secretary Robert
McNamara backs him in this.
Wilson is thinking of renegoti-
ating the 1954 BrusselsTreaty
that binds Britain to keep 55,000
men in West Germany. Advisers
have convinced Wilson that a
smaller, better - balanced Rhine
army could pack quite as much
fire-power as Britain's 51,000
effectives posses now.
-Wilson is hoping Johnson will;
recognize in a material way that3
much of Britain's billion-dollar
yearly bill for her overseas garri-
sons serves the over-all allied in-
terest. At a time of financial crisis
for Britain he would be glad if
the Americans could find ways of
contributing toward the upkeep of
some of those positions.1

ed at
from

Berkeley
Governor

On

Ordr

IN MODERN FICTION:

SPolice Surround Hall Teachers on Strike

Fei~heim and Haun gh,.Censure of Actions; Students Picket

tJ Bly ROBERT BENDELObW 7

Lecture on S atire

WASHINGTON (W) --President
Lyndoh B. Johnson called yester-
day for closer ties with Western
allies but said the United States
is prepared to discuss with the
Soviet Union any proposal that
might strengthen the chances of
peace'.
He stressed, however, that any
negotiations with Moscow would
be in full consultation with this
country's allies.
In a speech at Georgetown
University, Johnson made what
seemed to be a conciliatory ges-
ture toward French President
Charles de Gaulle, saying this
country seeks to reason with, not
to dominate, its Western allies.
"We do not seek to have our way,
but to find a common way,"
Johnson said.
In a reference to the proposed
North Atlantic Treaty Nuclear
Naval Force, which de Gaulle op-
poses, Johnson said any new plan
for handling'of weapons so power-
ful deserves careful discussion.
"No solution will be perfect in
the eyes of everyone," he added.
"But the problem is there. It must
be solved. And we will continue
to work for its solution."
Johnson received an honorary
GOP Meeting
Condemns Split
DENVER (YP)-The chairman of
the Republican governors, Robert
A. Smylie of Idaho, called yester-
day for a change in the party's
leadership before there is a "splin-
tering situation" from which there
might be no retreat.
"The image has to be changed",
and the party put in the middle
of the American road, declared
Sfylie at a news conference.
The Idaho governor made clear
that in insisting that a change of
leadership is needed that he was
referring to the Republican Na-
tional Committee and its chair-
man and protege of Barry Gold-

degree of Doctor of Laws, the
same honorary degree which was
awarded posthumously to Presi-
dent John F. Kennedy.
Johnson also said efforts must
be made to increase the unity of
Europe "as a key to western
strength and a barrier to resur-
gent and erosive nationalism."
His speech drew applause at
several points, the first time when
he said, "We must all make sure
that the Federal Republic of Ger-
many is treated as an honorable
partner in the affairs of the
West." He said no one seeks to
end by force the "grim and dan-
gerous injustice" of a divided
Germany.

I By JULIE FITZGERALD
Satire as a literary form is
only possible in a society where
a consensus of -values is common
to the majority of the people.
A deterministic, mobile society
generally doesn't engender satire
ic literature.
This conclusion was reached by'
Prof. Marvin Felheim and Prof.
Robert Haugh, both of the Eng-
lish department, at a lecture spon-
sored by the Union Cultural Af-
fairs Committee last night.
GSC Calls .for
Housing Action
At its meeting last night, the
Graduate Student Council passed
a motion concerning housing for
graduate students.
As a result of the motion, GSC
will urge the University to build
both dormitories and co-ed apart-
ments.
GSC will encourage the con-
struction of modest apartments so
that rents can be lowered.

The lecture, entitled "Satire and
Modern Fiction," was begun by
Felheim who defined satire as a
literary form which explores and
exposes situations for the purpose
of amendment. "The satirist has
a moral purpose," he said.
Felheim said satire is concern-
ed with manners and morals of
society rather than of the individ-
ual, unless the individual is rep-
resentative of a type.
"Accentuation and exaggeration
are the methods of satire," he
said. He cited Jonathan Swift's
"Gulliver's Travels" where Swift
advocated solving the overpopula-
tion problem in Ireland by eating
all the children as an example.
Felheim said the satirist starts
with the assumption that the peo-
ple in his society are materially
well-off but are intellectually frus-
trated because there appears te,
be no meaning in the surface val-
ues of society.
Passive Society
"This passive society is' at-
tacked by the satirist who as-
sumes that by seeing its faults, a
society is capable of reforming
itself and therefore he offers no
solution," Felheim added.
Felheim and sex and bureauc-
racy are two areas where Ameri-
can society is vulnerable. "Every-
one is interested in sex and no
one can live without bureaucracy,"
hg said.
There may be a girl in Stock-
well who has never been found,"
he said.
History of Satire
Haugh continued the discussion
by tracing the history of satire
in 20th Century American and
English literature.
He cited J. P. Marquand who
he termed "a determinist who
would have liked to be a satirist,"
as a writer whose works reflect-
ed the mobility and determinism
of the 'first third of the century.
"The satirist needs a consensus
on which people agree and a rela-
tive stability in society. Determ-
inism and mobility are not con-
ducive to satire," he said.,
Consensuses
He noted that as more areas of
agreement appear, there are more
fields of satire. "We have only,
recently reached the point where
the satirist could attack FreudianI
jargon," he said.
Tennessee Williams'."Baby Doll"
and Joseph Heller's "Catch 22"
were examples he gave of sexual
and military satire.
Haugh cited the growing knowl-

Californiastate troopers yester-
day arrested 801 student demon-
strators who Wednesday invaded
the University of California at
Berkeley administration building
and staged an all-night sit-in.
The students were arrested
amidst cries of police brutality,
for what University of California
President Clark Kerr termed "ir-
responsible and illegal action."
Under orders from California Gov.
Edmund G. Brown, the state
troopers, augmented by local po-
lice, moved into the administration
building at 3:45 a.m. yesterday
and started to haul the limp dem-
onstrators off to jail. Students who
left voluntarily were not taken
into custody.
Evacuation was completed by
3:15 p.m. yesterday afternodn. At
one point, the number of sympa-

thetic students climbing into the
building was greater than the
number police were remoying.
In related actions, teaching
assistants have gone on strike, and
astudents are picketing all en-
trances to the campus and all ma-
jor buildings. The teaching assist-
ants not on strike refused to cross
picket lines.
The action of the teaching
assistants has thrown the campus
into chaos, the Daily Californian,
the Berkeley student newspaper,
reported last night by telephone.
"With the graduates on strike,
more than 50 per cent of the
classes have been cancelled, and
mid-terms have likewise been can-
celled," a spokesman for the paper
said.
"Delirious as the non-demon-
strating students are over this,
the general consensus is that the
Free Speech Movement has gone

FIdentity with Death:
Studies of Hiroshima
By THOMAS FRIEDMAN
"For the explosion-affected populace of Hiroshima the strong
identity with death paradoxically was enough to maintain life,"
Robert Lifton, professor of psychoanalysis at 'Yale University, said
yesterday.
Lifton spoke in Lane Hall on the "Atomic Bomb Experience in
Hiroshima."
"For those explosion-affected victims within the city limits
there was the feeling of the whole word ending. There was no
panic, but a ghastly stillness. I
was not alive' said one victim."
Lifton interviewed survival vic-
tims in a recent study of the
psychological ramifications of the
A-bomb explosion.
"The more articulate victims in-
terviewed Spoke of the helpless:<>;
abandonment. Yet with all of this
it would appear that the populace
would be unable to avoid mass
psychosis;" Lifton said.
The mechanism which accounts
for the small number of psycho-
logical disturbances was a "psyche
closing-off," he said. "The people
ceased to feel. Emotional reaction
was just turned off. 'A paralysis
overcame my mind,' another vic-
tim said.
"Beyond this immediate reaction
to the horror, there followed self-
condemnation. The survivors felt .''
shame and guilt. 'Why did I survive?' was the question which plagued
the victims who were not immediately affected."
Lifton asked the explosion-affected victims a series of questions
pertaining to their reaction weeks following the blast. The survivors
who were not immediately affected usually'developed the radiation
symptoms," he said. These symptoms are such things as loss of hair,
blood abnormalities and general body deterioration.
"The continuous devastation resulted in a strong identification

i

too far, and both the FSM and
the administration are in the
wrong," the spokesman claimed.
Senate
The faculty Academic Senate
met in an ad hoc session, with
over 700 of the 1200 faculty mem-
bers present. They strongly con-
demned Brown's action, declaring
they adhor "the presence of the
California Highway Patrol on
campus."
They issued a three-point state-
ment after yesterday's massive
arrests.
"We recommend," the faculty
statement read:
-"That the new and liberalized
rules for campus political action
be declared in effect and enforced,
pending their improvement;
-"That all pending campus ac-
tion against students for acts oc-
curing before the present date be
dropped;
-"That a committee, selected
by and responsible to the Aca-
demic Senate, be established, to
which students may appeal deci-
sions of the administration re-
garding penalties for violations re-
lating to offenses arising from
political action, and that deci-
sions of this committee be final."
Jailed
The protestors were jailed, with
bail set at $250 to $3200 each.
Mario Savio, the leader of the
FSM and yesterday's demonstra-
tion was reportedly placed in soli-
tary confinement.
Prominent faculty members are
reportedly raising money for the
students' bail.
Previous to' yesterday's arrests,
the teaching assistants, equivalent
to University teaching fellows
.here, said they would strike for
several days if police action was
taken.
Brown acted independently of
the university, Berkeley sources
told The Daily. He ordered the
Highway Patrol to the campus
when he thought the situation
had gotten out of hand.
Both the Daily Californian and
the administration spokesman
said they heard reports that the
Academic Senate passed a resolu-
tion asking for the resignation of
Chancellor Edward W. Strong,
Berkeley's chief administrator.
AAUP
Prof. John H. Reynolds, Berke-
ley chapter chairman of the
American Association of Univer-
sity Professors, issued a statement
demanding removal of Strong.
"The present crisis cannot be
stilled unless there is a complete
amnesty and a new chief campus
official appointed who has the
complete confidence of the uni-
vei'sity," said the statement ap-
proved by the chapter's board of
directors.
In Sacramento late yesterday
Brown said he assumed "full re-

'Oliver.' 'Luther' in PTP Series

I

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan