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December 01, 1964 - Image 4

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1964-12-01

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Seventy-FifthYear
EDrrED AND MANAGED BY STUDENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
UNDER AUTHORITY OF BOARD IN CONTROL OF STUDENT PUBLICATIONS

FEIFFER

spoommmummOm Y- f

here Opinions Are Free, 420 MAYNARD ST., ANN ARBOR, MicH.
Truth Will Prevail

NEWS PHONE: 764-0552

Editorials printed in The Michigan Daily express the individual opinions of staff writers
or the editors. This must be noted in all reprints.
TUESDAY, DECEMBER 1, 1964 NIGHT EDITOR: ROBERT HIPPLER

Johnson, McNamara Begin
To Revise U.S. Priorities

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THE UNITED STATES government,
through Robert McNamara, has finally
cut defense spending. The secretary of
defense announced recently that 95 in-
efficient and unnecessary military instal-
lations would be closed, saving $47 million
annually. Apparently the President in-
tends to use the savings to finance long-
overdue social and economic measures.
There are, of course, numerous ironies
in this situation. A Democratic adminis-
tration and President Johnson have gone
totally contrary to the appellations of
"wild spenders" and "crass politician"
which conservative mythology has so
often employed in characterizing them.
Indeed, many fiscal conservatives such as
Gov. William Scranton and Sen. Richard
Russell are now deploring the secretary's
economies. They have been joined by
Sen.-elect Robert Kennedy and Sen. Ja-
cob Javits-all doubtless quite surprised
to find each other in the same political
bed. In fact of all the nation's leaders,
only Senators Douglas and Ribicoff have
commended the action.
THIS UPROAR, from almost all parts
of the country and from almost all
shades of opinion, is perhaps intended,
only to console irate constituents. But
when Governor Rockefeller demands a
meeting with the President, when Sena-
tor Javits promises a "hue and cry," when
Rep. Emmanuel Celler starts making om-
inous threats -about coordinated trouble-
making in Congress, one is disposed to
think that some of these protestors ac-
tually believe what they are saying.
The somewhat petulant denunciation
of spending cuts by men who have been
denouncing spending increases for most
of their lives may simply be an insistence

on self-interest over the national inter-
est. But many people in this nation have
also evidently come to believe that a
strong military force is the most impor-
tant, if not the only, means of self-pro-
tection.
JN OUR DESIRE to be as well-preserved
as possible, we therefore spend, after
an hour of desultory congressional debate,
over $50 billion on military matters. And
yet Congress devotes months of agonized
thrashings to some measure such as medi-
cal care, the war on poverty and foreign
aid, costing perhaps one per cent of our
armaments appropriation. All in all, as
Senator Fulbright has observed, "We have
had to turn away from our hopes in or-
der to concentrate on our fears, and the
result has been accumulating neglect of
those things which bring happiness and
beauty and fulfillment into our lives."
In assuming that the common defense
promotes the general welfare, the nation
has made a singularly grave mistake. The
situation is rather the reverse. A society
marked by high unemployment, poverty,
ignorance. and mediocrity can scarcely
be considered "strong," and yet our so-
ciety perpetually neglects such problems
and devotes much of its energy to paying
for military equipment that is no longer
necessary.
PRESIDENT JOHNSON and Secretary
McNamara appear, however, to have
taken a look at this striking inversion of
priorities, and to have concluded that it
must be ended. This is, of course, an act
of courage, and it is also an act of wisdom
and foresight.
--MARK KILLINGSWORTH

FAT CHANCE! IN 115~
COUNTRY YOU) MAKE A
YOURE OUT! ,
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MEN MUST COOPERATE ..*
The Fulfillment of Human Needs,

Romney and Higher Education

By ELIZABETH H. SUMNER
OURS HAS BEEN called an "Age
of Transition," an "Age of
Crisis," a "turning point in human
history," a "crisis in the Human
Being Evolving." We have heard
much about the "identity crisis"
of our time and most of us are
somewhat aware of the fact that
this is, indeed, "an age of an-
xiety."
We have also heard much about
problems confronting our society,
our world and our university .. .
problems of expansion, technology,
mass society, impersonalization,
dehumanization, isolation a n d
alienation. Students feel they are
but products on an assembly line;
so do administrators and faculty.
All of us feel the pressure to
"produce or perish" and we have
become dependent upon short-
term rewards, group acceptance
and "instant success" as well as
"instant relief."
To the extent to which we are
dependent on such things as
good grades, good jobs, frequent
promotions and continual tangible
"progress," we are that much
more manipulable, controllable
and unfree. We are torn between
being the person we want to be
and being the person our society
expects us to be. And, whether we
are aware of thereasons for our
conditions or not, we do feel
anxiety about the fact that so
much of our life seems to be de-
termined for us, even from birth.
Minority groups have, by and
large, always felt the pressure of
cultural determination; and all
of us have, at one time or another,
felt the pressure to "keep our
place" and not "rock the boat."
But knowledge is a means to un-
derstanding and therefore to free-
dom. And I think it may help us
somewhat if we can understand
some of the pressures that con-
front us, some of the "whys" of
what often seems like one grand
rate race. It may also help us if
we can see that what often appear
to be distinctly "University prob-

lems" are really aspects of a prob-
lem which confronts our entire
culture.
* * *
THE "produce or perish" philos-
ophy" seems to pervade every facet
of our life; it is felt by a child
before he ever sets foot in a
school room. Parents tend to
measure their success as parents
by how pretty, handsome, clever,
strong and alert are the-ir children.
We are compared with others
from birth. Upon entering school
the pressure increases-our de-
veloping skills are compared, as
are our social attitudes, our health
habits and our play habits. Good
performance is rewarded and poor
performance often punished. The
pellet system works well for train-
ing rats, but it is presently held in
question as far as human learn-
ing is concerned.
Now with our population ex-
plosion and new demands for more
technical and "mental" skills, edu-
cation has become and will con-
tinue to become an increasingly
necessary means for living in a
technological society. Like food,
shelter and clothing, education
has become a basic necessity for
physical survival in our society.
Parents are naturally anxious that
they be able to provide good edu-
cation for their children; they are
also anxious that their children
be at the "top"tof the class, for
they know that the rewards in
our society, as it is presently con-
stituted, go to the "victors." We
are still operating on a philosophy
of the "survival of the fittest."
But not all people can be at
"the top." Our society, and this
includes our university, has really
not faced up to the problems which
occur for those who cannot and
do not make it "to the top." We
still tend to flounder when it
comes to matters of social respon-
sibility. Therefore, many of our
problems are still seen as "per-
sonal," "individual" problems, de-
manding personal and individual
solutions-when, in reality, it
seems to me, they are personal
problems which increasingly call

for community
tions.

and societal solu-

* * *
THIS HAS perhaps been most
vividly seen in the area of civil
rights. Prejudice and discrimina-
tion are, of course, matters which
each person must think about and
act upon for himself; but they
are also concerns which are so
pervasive that they must be tackl-
ed by governmental action at
every level of our common life.
We can say that the only real
education is "your own education,"
that pellet learning is insufficient
for the growth and development
of human beings, that "production
for production's sake" is an empty
and meaningless goal, that "profit
at any cost" is a dehumanizing
force in our economic life. But the
solution demands more than each
lonely individual's struggle for
transcendence over such pressures.

use the grading system, that em-
ployers do much of their hiring on
this basis, that entrance into other
graduate schools is dependent up-
on it and so on. Such a decision
would require implementation by
every university in the nation;
it might even require implementa-
tion in every grade school and
high school. And that would be
but a token beginning toward al-
lowing the educational process to
take place. But it would be a
beginning.
THERE HAS BEEN much ef-
fort expended by many in the
attempt to name some of our
"cultural villains" - Madison
Avenue, Uncle Sam, moral decay,
creeping socialism,, bigness, mass
media, specialization. P a r e n t s

ELIZABETH H. SUMNER is program as-
sistant at the Office of Religious Af-
fairs. She taught a non-curricular course
in "American Culture and the Crisis of
Ar > Idebtity this fall, and has talked to many
campus groups about the "feminine mys-
tique" and "identity crises." Mrs. Sumner
came to the University in 1963 from Episco-
pal Theological School in Cambridge, Mass.

SUPPORTERS of Gov. George Romney
say "no one can doubt that the gov-
ernor has done much for education in
this state" and that Romney's two years
as governor have yielded "great increases
in the educational budget." These state-
ments express a basic misconception
about Romney's relationship to the insti-
tutions of higher education in Michigan.
A look at recent appropriation figures
should put a stop to the misguided idea
that all is sweetness and light between
Romney and state higher education.
In 1963, Romney's first year in- office,
the governor's budget recommendation
included a total of $115.4 million for
operating expenses for all public higher
education in the state. This recommenda-
tion was a drastic slash of the requests
made by the state's colleges and univer-
sities; the University received $6 million
less than it requested, Michigan State
lost $7.2 million and Wayne State's re-
quest was slashed $5.5 million by Romney.
THE CUTS recommended in Romney's
budget were met with alarm by the
officers of the state's schools. University
Executive Vice-President Marvin L. Nie-
huss expressed "disappointment" with the
governor's recommendation and said that
the University's "original request was
tight" and didn't deserve to be cut at all.
MSU President John Hannah was "very
upset that the recommendation would not
allow the state institutions to hold the
current level of state support on a per-
student basis and provide, for the hoped-
for 25 per cent faculty salary adjust-
ments."
Rep. Gilbert Bursley of Ann Arbor said
that he was disappointed in the gover-
nor's recommendation, but that "Michi-
H. NEIL BERKSON, Editor
KENNETH WINTER EDWARD HERSTEIN
Managing Editor Editorial Director
ANN GWIRTZMAN .............. Personnel Director
BILL BULLARD ....... ........ Sports Editor
MICHAEL SATTINGER .... Associate Managing Editor
JOHN KENNY . .........Assistant Managing Editor
DEBORAH BEATTIE...... Associate Editorial Director
LOUISE LIND ........ Assistant Editorial Director in
Charge of the Magazine
TOM ROWLAND ... ..... .. Associate Sports Editor
GARY WYNER .............. Associate Sports Editor
STEVEN HALLER ...........Contributing Editor
MARY LOU BUCHR .........Contributing Editor
CHARLES TOWLE ........ Contributing Sports Editor
JAMES KESON ................ Chief Photographer.
NIGHT EDITORS: David Block, John Bryant, Jeffrey
Goodman, Robert Hippler, Robert Johnston, Lau-

THE 'U' COULD HELP

gan must put its fiscal house in order
first." This expresses a situation that
many people have tended to overlook:
much of Michigan's fiscal problem was
solved by skimping on appropriations for
higher education.
LAST YEAR ROMNEY established a spe-
cial Citizens' Committee on Higher
Education to study the needs of higher
education in the state and come up with
recommendations for appropriations. This
"blue-ribbon" committee, some 50 of the
state's top citizens from business, labor
and other fields, recommended as a
"bare minimum" a $25 million boost for
operating expenses for the state's insti-
tutions of higher education in 1964.
However, Romney chose to ignore the
committee's recommendation and re-
quested only a $21 million increase for
higher education. The University asked
for $47.8 million and received only $45.2
million. In the field of capital outlay
funds, the "blue-ribbon" group recom-
mended $49 million, but Romney saw fit
to request only $27 million.
These extreme cuts in the higher edu-
cation appropriation were occurring at
the same time the state was in the process
of piling up a surplus of over $50 million.
ROMNEY HAS BEEN a bane rather than
a boon to higher education in Michi-
gan. He used the colleges and universi-
ties of this state as his fiscal whipping-
boy while he was getting "the state's fis-
cal house in order," and left them short
of necessary funds so he could have a
budgetary surplus to flaunt during an
election year.
-THOMAS R. COPI
Happy 1984
BOY THOSE COLLEGE dormitory archi-
tects don't miss a bet.
Monmouth College, New Jersey, install-
ed a close circuit TV system in a new
dormitory so that "housemother Edith
Keiser can keep the wolves from the door
without leaving her room."
According to a recent article in TV
Guide, a camera is pointed at the vesti-
bule and door. By use of an intercom
system Mrs. Keiser can insure complete
safety for her girls when they return on
a date.
Mrs. Keiser remarks that when the

The student who writes what he
honestly feels is his best appraisal
of a situation or solution to a given
problem is still subject to detour
on the "road to success" if it
doesn't at the same time confor
to what will earn the good grade
or merit the PhD degree.
Even if the University should
courageously decide that grades
in higher education inhibit the
process of "discovery and learn-
ing" and the development of the
radical and creative capacities of
the human being and therefore
eliminates the grading system
from a University of Michigan
education, it would not be enough.
The student would know all the
while that other universities do

"He Shouldn't Have Inhaled"

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blame children for not working
hard enough; psychologists point
to the problems of parents over-
identifying with their children,
denying them their freedom in an
attempt to live through them;
social workers point to the prob-
lems of broken homes and mi-
grant and slum families; educa-
tors blame school boards and vice
versa; parents blame schools; and
many, in their anxiousness over
what seems to be a decay in per-
sonal freedom, are afraid to let
representative bodiesasuch as the
Congress propose new solutions
to the problems caused by our age
of technology and transition.
And it is at this point that the
University can perhaps be of great-
est service to the ills besetting us.
The University is uniquely equip-
ped to examine our society criti-
cally, to pool its vast resources, its
developing knowledge, its best
minds, in proposing new alterna-
tives to our government and to
our people.
This was once the function of
a university-to be its culture's
chief critic and physician. Could it
be such again? Or do we have to
continue engaging ourselves in
problems thrust upon us because
that is the only way in which re-
search grants , can be received?
Do we have to continue gearing
curriculi to what employers want
or to what outmoded educational
practices demand or to what will
produce the most "educated" at
the lowest cost? Do we have to
continue educating people for the
corporation, for "the way things
are," or could we begin to educate
the corporations for the way
people are and the society for the
way things might be?
WHAT HOLDS US BACK? The
villains are not so much villains,
I think, as they are victims, as we
all are, of an outmoded philos-
ophy. The villains such as Madison
Avenue are simply those who are
exploiting our vulnerability in this
age of transition - using our
strengths such as education, mass
media, plentiful goods and serv-
ices, to "make money" rather than
as means for our growth as a
humane society. Our present needs
are not so much those of produc-
tion as they are of distribution. As
a culture we can produce food and
clothing and shelter in abundance
-yet we all fear that if we don't
make it "to the top" we shall

ed by our strengths and our
knowledge and our machines.
No lonely individual can, by
himself, handle the problem con-
fronting us. We feel this, as Uni-
versity students, about the prob-
lems of the University life into
which we are thrust. And, in our
frustration, we tend to think that
it is our lonely problem and no
one else's, and we can be tempted
to give up the task of thinking
critically and living responsibly
in our society. But, if we know
that many offour problems as stu-
dents stem from a common cul-
tural problem, perhaps we can be
more personally free. Then we
may be able to better understand
the problems we shall face in our
jobs, in our families, in our com-
munities, nation and world.
THE PHILOSOPHY that "there
is room at the top" for everyone
has always, I think, been out-
moded. Can we dare to hope that
human needs may begin to take
priority over the needs of any par-
ticular system, whether that sys-
tem be economic, political, social
or religious? It will not happen
by our lonely hoping or wishful
thinking. The University, however,
could be that center where the
growing knowledge of human
needs and capacities could be
brought to bear upon an examina-
tion of all our "sacred cows," our
assumptions, prejudices and pre-
suppositions. Out of such a meet-
ing could new alternatives be en-
visioned and voiced; they might
even be heard and be given a
chance.
NEXT WEEK:
Arnold Kaufman
Hoover
On Crime
PREDICTABLY, so much contro-
versy has been stirred by J.
Edgar Hoover's critical comments
about Martin Luther King that
the rest of the now-famous inter-
view with the Federal Bureau of
Investigation chief has been large-
ly overshadowed.
This is too bad, because Mr.
Hoover had commented on some
matters of more general impor-
tance than his personal appraisal
of the civil rights leader.
For one thing, he discussed the
rise in crime - which has been
greatest in our cities. The federal
government is going to great ex-
pense these days to try to "renew"
the cities, and lure the deserting
middle-class families back into
them. Certainly this money will be
merely squandered unless the cit-
ies are safe as well as glittering.
He identified two sources of part
of the trouble. One is the growing
tendency of courts to be lenient
with offenders and hard on the
police officers who arrest them,
evidently in support of the theor-
ies of some sociologists that crime
is not the fault of those who com-
mit it. The other is the tendency
to treat ham-handed, 200-pound,
bewhiskered young men as "juve-
niles," no matter how awful and
repetitive their offenses.
IT MAY BE TRUE that crime
can be obliterated by improve-
ment of "society," but any such
approach will take a long time. So
far, poverty has been shrinking as
crime has been growing. So far,
more people have more education
and more are committing crimes.
But, even so, perhaps in the long
run crime rates will fall because
of such improvements.

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