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November 19, 1964 - Image 4

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The Michigan Daily, 1964-11-19

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Seventy-Fifth Year
EDrrED AND MANAGED BY STUDENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
UNDER AUTHORITY OF BOARD IN CONTROL OF STUDENT PUBLICATIONS

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Where Opinions Are Free, 420 MAYNARD ST., ANN ARBOR, MICH.
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NEWS PHONE: 764-0552

Editorials printed in The Michigan Daily express the individual opinions of staff writers
or the editors. This must be noted in all reprints.
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 1964 NIGHT EDITOR: KENNETH WINTER

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I

Library Book Thefts:
Some Possible Preventives

THE UNIVERSITY libraries' charging
system not only does not prevent the
theft of books but in some cases en-
courages it.
It is common knowledge that it is easy
to steal books from at least the two major
libraries on campus: the UGLI and the
General Library. Students throw books
out windows either to a confederate
waiting outside or simply to the ground,
where they are later picked up; they
sneak books by the checker at the door
by putting them under a coat; or they
simply carry the books right past the
checker without stopping to have them
checked.
E GREATEST FACTOR in the book
theft problem is the "overnight re-
serve" policy of the libraries. It is based
on the assumption that under this poli-
cy a particular book will always be
available to a student no matter when
he seeks to use it.
This assumption, however, is false.
Very often all the copies of a certain
"overnight" book are charged out short-
ly after the earliest permissible time. A
student may find that he cannot study
effectively in the library or that he has
no time to study during the day, and by
the time he gets to the library in the
evening the overnight books he needs
have already been checked out. This per-
son may steal the books he needs if he
gets a chance.
Another reason for the fantastic num-
ber of books that are stolen from the li-
braries each year is the amount of trou-
ble a student must go through to take
books from the library legitimately. It is
often easier to steal books than to take
the time to fill out a name-address-
phone-school-year-call number-author-
title charge slip for each book and then
have to wait while the checker at the door
looks at each book to see that it has
been properly charged.
THE LIBRARIES could take either of
two extreme policy positions to solve
the theft problem; both have been tried,
each is unfeasible. On the one hand, the
University could do away with all charg-
ing restrictions and operate the libraries
on the honor system. This was once test-
ed in the UGLi, and the result-the utter
disappearance of the 1800 honor books-
shows that it does not work.
On the other hand, the libraries could
go back to keeping the stacks closed to
students, which would actually do away
entirely with the theft problem. Aside
from the complete restructuring of the
libraries that this would require, doing so
would come into basic conflict with the
"open-stacks philosophy" on which the
University's libraries-and in fact most
libraries-are based.
The "open-stacks philosophy" is a facet
of the problem that is often overlooked

but is nevertheless quite important -
perhaps even more than the question of
thievery. According to this philosophy,
the stacks are open not so much to en-
able the libraries to operate with fewer
personnel but rather to allow the stu-
dents to browse and to charge not only
those books they must read for courses,
but also others that interest them and
would add to their total educational ex-
perience.
ONE OF THE POSSIBLE solutions to
the problem is locking all the libraries
in the same manner the UGLi is now
locked, and placing a thorough checker
at each exit to insure that the student
has no opportunity to remove books on
his person. This presents a major problem,
however: it would take an impossibly
long time to make the kind of thorough
checks necessary at the exits.
Another possibility is the initiation of
a faster charging system. For example,
the libraries could photostat a student's
University ID card and the card of each
book he checks out. Along with faster
charging, a new spot-checking system at
the exits could be introduced; not every-
one would have to wait in line to have
all their books checked, but there would
still be the threat of having a check, to
deter potential thieves.
ASSUMING THE LIBRARIES are going
to continue with the open-stack poli-
cy, something must also be done about
the overnight-reserve system, the area
in which the libraries suffer their great-
est losses. If the overnight policy were
abolished and the books put back into
open circulation, thefts might go down,
but there would still be the problem of
these books being unavailable to a great
number of students.
A better alternative would be to put
all the overnight books on "closed re-
serve." This system necessitates that a
student charge a book before he can lay
a hand on it. The libraries would have
to set aside many more shelves than are
now used for closed reserve books and
hire new personnel to get the books for
students who want to charge them. The
feasibility of the plan hinges on whether
it would cost more to make the change
to a more complete closed reserve system
than it presently costs to replace the
books that are stolen each year from the
open reserves.
THESE PLANS-locking the windows in
the libraries, speeding up the charg-
ing process, replacing the "total checker"
with a "spot-checker," putting all the
books presently on overnight reserve into
closed reserve-would cut down not only
on the opportunities to steal books from
the libraries but also on the desire and
need for doing so.
-THOMAS COPI

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I

I

FRATERNITY AND SORORITY DISCRIMINATION:
National Organizations: Root of Affiliate Problems

By LAUREN BAHR
THE QUESTION of whether fra-
ternities and sororities are
compatible with the present day
conception of a public university
hinges on the basic discriminatory
character of these organizations.
Fraternities and sororities are
private social clubs. A recent con-
gressional directive to the Civil
Rights Commission supports this
statement by specifically mention-
ing college fraternities and sorori-
ties along with other social clubs
as not subject to investigation by
the commission.
Selection of members in private
social clubs is the concern of the
members, and of them only. No
outside group has the right to
interfere.
WITH THE RENEWED em-
phasis on nondiscrimination per-
petuated by the civil rights move-
ment, discriminatory organizations
of all types have come under
attack. A public institution such
as the University cannot tolerate
the existence of such groups with-
in its established framework.
In an address before a fra-
ternity and sorority presidents'
banquet in April, 1964, Regent
Allan R. Sorenson tackled the
problem of fraternity and sorory
discrimination.
"We are in this untenable posi-
tion at present: 1) We have fra-
ternities as an officially recognized
part of the University, in any seg-
ment of which, as a publicly sup-
ported institution, there very
clearly can be no form or trace
of discrimination on the basis of
race, religion or national origin;
2) the right of free association,
indeed the right to discriminate
must be guaranteed to those
groups as private clubs."
* * *
SORENSON PROPOSED two
possible solutions to the dilemma.
The solution he prefers is to
disassociate fraternities and soror-
ities from the University.
"These private clubs must be
private in fact, that is separated
clearly and precisely from this
University and from all our sae
supported institutions.
Sorenson's proposal to disaf-
filiate fraternities and sororities
from the University met with un-
favorable reaction from students
closely associated with the so-
called "Greek system."
* * *
BOTH Lawrence Lossing, presi-
dent of Interfraternity Council
and Ann Wickins, president of
Panhellenic Association felt that
such a nonrecognition policy
would create many problems for
the system.
It would create difficulties in
terms of the mechanics of running
the organizations. "We would have
no facilities in the Student Activi-
ties Bldg., no provisions for hold-
ing rush sign-up on campus and
difficulties in advertising on Uni-
versity property," Lossing said.
Sororities might have diffEtilty
attracting pledges under a dis-
associated status. "How could we
ask students who come to get an
education from the Universiy to
join a group which is separated
from and not recognized by the
University?" Miss Wickins asked.
It would be necessary to employ
sorority alumni to handle the jobs
which now fall to University ad-
ministrators. If alumni advisors
and supervisors replaced the Uni-
versity administrators it could
mean greater control by alumni,
who are not necessarily familiar
with the University and its tem-
perament.
*w *M ,
SORENSON'S SECOND proposal
hinges on the premise that "fra-
ternities drastically change their
nature, their traditions, their na-
tional affiliations so as to be in
t r u t h student organizations

support the discriminatory charac-
ter of fraternities and sororities.
They retain an outdated concep-
tion of these groups as elitist
structures that must prevent "un-
desirables" from contaminating
the system.
THE QUESTION comes down
to the gulf that exists between
alumni in national organizations
and undergraduate students in
local chapters. The undergradu-
ates are asking for the opportun-
ity to select members without re-
gard to race, color or creed, a
thing which the alumni cannot or
do not want to understand.
Regents Bylaw 2.14 states that
all student organizations must

select members on the basis of
personal merit. Race, religion,
color, creed, national origin or
ancestry cannot be factors used
either positively or negatively, in
the selection of memberes within
student organizations.
In order to insure compliance
with this ruling, all fraternities
and sororities were asked to file
a statement with SGC about the
selection of their membership.
This demand prompted the in-
clusion in many local chapter
constitutions, of nondiscrimina-
tion clauses if they were not al-
ready existent. The local chapters
acted in good faith; it was the
nationals that raised protests.

Making the Best of Gambling

VI isit
))
P re-War Gecrma Fl
441
IMAEDCHEN IN UNIFORM :
Pre=-mar GermanFilm
Interesting, .But .Dated
"jAEDCHEN IN UNIFORM" presents an interesting glimpse into
both the pre-war German cinema and the early protest against
the encroaching authoritarianism that finally overtook the country.
While the film moves smoothly and vividly makes its point, the short-
comings of its technique keep it from being more than a period piece
of historical interest.'
The development of the plot is straightforward and simple. A
sensitive young girl, Manuela, enters a girls boarding school. The strict
discipline of the school accentuates her need for affection, for which
she turns to Fraulein von Bernburg, her young and understanding
teacher.
In the dehumanized authoritarian atmosphere their affection mani-
fests itself in an ambiguous "mother-daughter" relationship frought
with erotic overtones. On Manuela centers the struggle between the
fear generated by the harsh and cold discipline of the principal and
the sympathy and understanding given by Fraulein von Bernburg.
ALTHOUGH THE acting of Dorthea Wicck and Hedig Schlichter
is often excellent, it is marred by a stylization that is typical to the
twenties and thirties but is unacceptable today-emotions and con-
flicts are more projected than expressed. Similarly, too often the theme
lapses into what is by now the cliche of "they need love and under-
standing."
At the same time, the photography suffers from a similar defect.
By and large it is quite competent and at moments is surprisingly
expressive-but these moments flash out with little or no photographic
continuity, perhaps even from a particularly flat or unimaginative
sequence.
AN INTERESTING and surprising aspect of the film is its erotic
overtones and its unabashed presentation of them. All-powerful
authority is shown here to impose a sterile atmosphere where the
most basic desires slip unconsciously into aberrations of normal
emoion. f aDar with this notion is the very "setting" of the

LOCAL NONDISCRIMINATION
clauses do not negate rules or
regulations of the national or-
ganizations since local chapters
are not autonomous bodies. This
fact is well-illustrated by an in-
cident that occurred at Stanford
University in 1961.
The Beta Psi chapter of Alpha
Tau Omega fraternity at Stan-
ford, in the spring quarter of
1960, pledged four Jewish boys
during the regular rushing period.
Late in the summer of that year
the national office notified the
local president that the chapter
was to depledge these four boys
since they were in violation of
the national membership regula-
ions which state: "Only white
males who have accepted the
Christian faith shall be eligible
to membership." The chapter was
given until October 15, 1960 to
depiedge these four men.
Prior to this deadline, the active
chapter voted unanimously to
keep the four pledges. The policy
of California Beta Psi was to.
select members because they were
outstanding individuals. "We are
entirely satisfied to accord our
support to any man chosen for
his character and integrity to be
a member of- our national fra-
ternity regardless of race, creed or
color," the members said in a
letter to an alumnus.
This attitude was in direct com-
pliance with established policy at
Stanford. "The University is op-
posed to discriminatory acial and
religious clauses and practices. In-
sofar as such clauses or practices
presently exist, the University will
work actively with student groups
to eliminate them at the earliest
possible date."
A hearing was held on the mat-
ter and the High Council of Alpha
Tau Omega saw fit to place tle
Beta Psi charter in escrow be-
cause of its failure to comply with
national regulations.
THIS IS only one illustration of
how the local chapters wishing
to comply with nondiscriminatory
rulings of the universities with
which they are affiliated may
come into conflict with the na-
tional organizations to which they
owe their existence.
A similar situation exists among
sororities. Many nationals nave
the power of "negative recommen-
dation." That is, they may ask a
local chapter not to pledge a cer-
tain girl on grounds which have
not been made public.
Most of the chapters at the
University have refused'to accept
"negative recommendations" bas-
ed " on race, color, creed, religion
or national origin. They will only
accept such recommendations bas-
ed on morals.
Whatmcategories the word
morals includes has not been spe-
cified. Undefined, "morals" can
be expanded to encompass a mul-
titude of areas and can be used
in place of the other discrimina-
tory bases for refusing a girl. The

national affiliations. At present
the two are mutually exclusive.
Local chapters do not want their
membership selection process re-
stricted by the University and yet
they also feel that it should not
be restricted by discriminatory
clauses.
THE UNIVERSITY in asking
for nondiscriminatory member-
ship policies is not impinging in
any way on the rights of these
groups. It is, in a sense, offering
them the rights which are pres-
ently being denied by the national
organizations-the right of free
selection of members.
Chapters can remain affiliated
with the University on only one
condition: the eventual com-
pliance of national organizations
with University regulations bythe
removal of national discrimina-
tory clauses.
Then and only then will fra-
ternities and sororities be able to
operate within the context of their
nationals and still remain a legi-
timate part of the University com-
munity.
SOLOISTS:
Varied
Concert
T HE New York Chamber Soloists,
presented Tuesday by the Uni-
versity Musical Society, gave a
concert of extraordinary interest;
their performances ranged up-
wards from good to superb.
A short cantata by George Tele-
man opened the concert. The live-
ly, gusty, sometimes noisy per-
formance of this composition left
me thinking that teleman's re-
nown in his own day was pos-
sibly not such a gross mistake as
is commonly thought today. But
it takes a performance such as
this one to show why Telemann
was once considered the greatest
composer of his time.
A Sonata in A Major for Violin
and Viola by Joseph Haydn, play-
ed by Gerald Tarak, violin, and
Ynez Lynch, viola, showed how
convincingly a great master can
meet the challenge of composing
in an unusual and problematical
medium. The performance was
not letter-perfect, not what you
would hear on a record, but was
good enough to show the beauty
of the composition.
* * *
IT WAS particularly pleasing to
hear a good, live performance of
"Concert Royal No, 4," by Fran-
gois Couperin, since performances
of Couperin's larger works are
extremely rare. The Concerts are
dance suites with prelude, writ-
ten in one or two parts over a
bass, and with the middle har-
mony carefully filled in.
The particular instrumentation
is left largely to the pleasure of
the performers. The harpsichord
alone can play the entire com-
position, or it may be doubled by
three or even four instruments.
The performers last night chose
to present the repetition of the
two halves of each dance always
in a new combination. This had
the effect of bringing into relief
one beautiful line after another.
The bass especially was revealed
as a line of extraordinary variety
and expressive power.
Ornamentation, one of the cru-
cial elements in Couperin's music,
was done with fine style. It was
especially amazing to hear Tarak
and Melvin Kaplan, oboe, execute
long and complicated ornaments
perfectly in unison.
THE QUARTET in F Major, K.
370, for Oboe and Strings by W.

I

"I WANNA PLAY CARDS, and I don't
mean poker."
The student who said this was re-
ferring to football betting cards which
circulate freely around Ann Arbor and
just about anywhere else where football
fans have a buck to risk and a gambling
spirit.
Like playing the numbers game, gam-
bling on the cards is illegal but very
few arrests or prosecutions are made.
Normally the money bet is from one to
ten dollars per card.
It is quite simple to play them, but
very difficult to beat them. On the cards
are printed twenty or twenty-five of the
big college games of the week plus most
of the pro games. The betting odds are
given with the games. The bettor must
pick at least five games from the list and
choose every one of those games correct-
ly or he loses the amount he bets. He
may choose more than five games with
the amount he can win rising corres-
pondingly with the number of games
guessed.
THE PAYOFF if a person wins is prompt,
but the unpredictability of football is
such that the bettor is going against
very heavy odds. The crime syndicates in
Detroit and Chicago reap the profits

with a Daily associate sports editor. Rio
was, of course, dismissed from the team,
the sports writer was fired.
Certainly there is no evidence that any
members of the Michigan team have had
anything to do with the cards, though
most of the players know that they are
prevalent.
The cards are just as popular for
basketball and potentially much more
dangerous, because it is considerably eas-
ier to fix a basketball game than a foot-
ball game. College basketball has been
shaken repeatedly by scandals. If a gam-
bler can corrupt just one basketball
player he can easily keep point spreads
the way he wants them.
MICHIGAN IS a basketball hotbed this
season with a top-ranked team so
one can expect a heavier influx of cards
than usual.
There are no easy remedies for the
betting card malady, if it is indeed a
malady. The police might raid every fra-
ternity house and apartment searching
for the cards, or infiltrate the syndicates
to seek out pushers, or put up posters di-
recting people not to gamble, but the
effectiveness of these remedies iS doubt-
ful. The gambling instinct in this coun-
try is too strong.
Perhaps the best policy would be to

I

'I

REGENT ALLAN R. SORENSON
nebulous charge of morals, be-

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