100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 18, 1964 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1964-11-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I

PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 18,194

,,A

Farabee Shuns Hero's Role

OSU Readies Massive Deterrent

* By BOB CARNEY
Two seasons ago, a sophomore
end named Ben Farabee stepped
into the Michigan limelight with
a 43 yard interception return
against Illinois.
Picking it off on the Illinois
44, Farabee raced to the one yard
line to set up Michigan's second
score and a 14-10 victorys
Since that game, the limelight
has eluded Farabee, and the start-
ing li'neup has only infrequently
included his name. For this rea-
son there's been a temptation to
overlook him when talk centers
on the key factors in Michigan's
success.
In the eyes of the Michigan
coaches, however, Farabee's role
in making the Wolverines a title
contender has been much more
significant.
Potential Starter
"Ben's been a potential starter
for the past two years," says end
coach Jocko Nelson. "He's always
been one of our top ends. But his
versatility has made him more
valuable to us as an alternate.
He plays not only offense and
defense, but both left and right
end as well."
The '64 season has seen added
improvement in Farabee, who
spent the latter part of last sea-
son on the sidelines mending a
broken wrist. According to Nel-
son, Farabee is playing more con-
sistently than ever.
"Ben has reached his peak,"
says Nelson. "As a result, we felt
that he deserved the added rec-
ognition of a starting spot against
Iowa. But whether he's starting
or not, there's been a place in
every'game for him."
In Farabee's own mind, his im-
Pep Rally.
There will be a pep rally on
the Diag Thursday evening at
7:30. The Marching Band,
football t e a m, cheerleaders,
Coach Bump Elliott and Presi-
dent Harlan Hatcher will be in
attendance. Wally Weber will
be emcee.
provement has been the result of
'two factors.
Blocking Improves
"First, I think the platoon sys-
tem has helped me," Farabee says.
"Specialization has given more of
us a chance to play. Secondly, I
think my blocking has improved
this year."
Farabee's added blocking skill
has been attributed by his coaches
to the determination he has ex-
hibited over the past two years.
"He's a hustler," says Nelson.
"It's a familiar sight to see num-
ber 80 downfield rolling at some-
one."
Head Coach Bump Elliott adds
that "Farabee's one of the hard-
est workers we've had."
In reward for thee efforts, Far-
abee has played extensively on
both the offense and the defense
since his sophomore year. Of the
two, he prefers defense.
"On defense," says Farabee,
"you know your job, and they've
got to move you. Actually, they
are on the defensive."
Offensive Start
Last Saturday, however, Fara-
bee held down the starting spot
at the left offensive end. In the
Michigan offensive setup the left
end1 remains tight while the right
end is split. Farabee favors this
tight position to the publicized
split end spot, which is utilized
more often as a pass receiver.
"There's more action inside,
and the tight end is inside most
of the time," says Farabee. "And
I'd rather be blocking then catch-
ing passes anyway."
Farabee began playing end -
and football-as a freshman at

By JIM TINDALL
"Something's got to give" as the
powerful Wolverine offense squares
off against the "monster" OSU
defense this weekend.
"Ohio State is an extremely
strong defensive team," explained
head coach Bump Elliott yester-
day. "Their particular forte is
rushing defense, and they are

one of the leaders in that de-
partment.
The statistics certainly bear
Elliott out on this point, for while
Michigan has consistenly rolled up
around 250 yards rushing per
game, leading the nation in this
department for the past two weeks,
the Buckeyes have limited their
conference opponents to a scant
77 yards a game.

SECOND WEEK IN A ROW:
AP Poll Ranks Blue
Ahead of Buckeyes

The burden of the game might
be pushed more on the shoulders
of the defense Saturday, for two
of the Buckeyes offensive back-
field starters are out of acLion.
Willard Sander, leading scorer for
OSU, will see limited action due
to injuries received in the North-
western game last week. He will
be relieved by sophomore Paul
Judson, who saw his first action
against the Wildcats last Saturday.
Barrington Out
Tom Barrington, starting, 216
pound halfback, will definitely be
out. of the lineup, and his slot
w: ll be filled by Leon Lindsay, a
180 pound senior. Lindsay did not
play at all last season, and has
been used by Hayes only sparingly
thin year.
With two starters out, quarter-
back Don Unverferth and halfback
Bob Rein will have to assume a
greater percentage of the offen-
sive chores.
Unverferth scored the touch-
down that beat the Wolverines
14-10 in Ann Arbor last year. As
a passer, the 208 pound junior
has averaged over 7.5 yards per
completion, which is tops in the
conference. In total offense he
has averaged better than 5.5 yards

in the Big Ten in that category
Rapid Rein
Rein is only a sophomore and
he has been averaging in the
neighborhood of 4 yards per carry
all season. He has good speed and
is a deceptive runner.
The Buckeyes use a platoon sys-
tem and have ten lettermen in
the starting defensive positions.
The lone exception is John Fill,
a sophomore halfback.
The defensive right tackle will
probably be Ed Orazen, 6', 228
pounds, who started both his
sophomore and junior years but
missed last year's Michigan con-
test for disciplinary reasons.
Guarding the Middle
Bill Ridder, who saw his first
starting assignment in the Michi-
gan game last fall, will start at
middle guard.
The other linebacking chores
will be handled by Tom Bugel and
Dwight Kelly. Bugel saw consid-
erable aclion last year and doabies
as an offensive center.
The secondary consists of Arnie

that spot, Doug Drenik, a two year
veteran, Don Harkins, a two year
man who led last year's team in
interceptions, and Fill.
While the defense has been a
strongpoint of the OSU team,
Elliott was quick to point out that
their offense, "regardless of vnom
they have starting," is a strong
one. Unverferth has completed
over fifty per cent of his passes,
and the line, at 215 ihunds per
man, can open up the holes their
runners need.
Hayes certainly will miss the
loss, or partial loss, of two mem-
bers of his offensive backfield, but
the Buckeyes have according to
Elliott, "plenty of good men that
they can throw into action.
Practice Notes
The Wolverines went through
a routine practice yesterday, work-
ing against OSU plays and de-
fenses. Practice ended with a 10
minute scrimmage between the
first string defense and the re-
serves who ran Buckeye plays.

per play, good enough for second Chonko, a three year veteran in

-Daily-Jim Lines
MICHIGAN END BEN FARABEE snares a pass in the Wol-
verines' 19-12 victory over Minnesota. The senior from Holland
(Mich.) claims that he prefers tight end to the more head line
making position of split "end. Versatile Farabee is equally at
home on defense as on offense.

By The Associated Press
Michigan held down sixth place
in the Associated Press college
football poll again this week, after
defeating Iowa 34-20.
With only one game left in the
season, against Ohio State, the
Wolverines have a 7-1 record.
Seventh ranked Ohio State, re-
bounding from its sole defeat to
Penn State, blanked Northwestern
10-0 last Saturday.
Undefeated Notre Dame's im-
pressive 34-7 victory over Mich-
igan State enabled the Fighting
Irish to increase their hold on
first place with only two weeks
left before the national titleholder
is crowned.
Louisiana State, which beat
Mississippi State 14-10, advanced
one notch to eighth. Syracuse and
Oregon took over the last two
spots, replacing Oregon State and.
Georgia Tech.
Syracuse beat Virginia Tech
20-15 and moved into the number
nine position. Oregon took over the

tenth spot with a 29-21 conquest
of Indiana. Oregon State, eighth
a week ago, was beaten by Stan-
ford 16-7 and Georgia Tech, tenth
last week, dropped a 24-7 verdict
to second-ranked Alabama.
Only three among the top five
teams are scheduled this Saturday.
Notre Dame plays Iowa, Arkansas
meets Texas Tech and Nebraska
closes its season against Okla-
homa. Alabama and Texas are idle
until Thanksgiving Day when the
Tide faces Auburn and the Long-
horns meet Texas A&M.
The Top Ten with first place
votes in parentheses, won-lost rec-
ords and points on a 10-9-8-7-6-5-

Pro Standings
NHIL
WLL T Pts. GF GA
Detroit 8 5 2 18 38 30
Montreal 6 3 5 17 40 28
New York 6 6 3 15 31 33
Toronto 5 5 4 14 38 34
Chicago 6 6 1 13 36 36
Boston 3 9 3 9 28 50
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
New York 2. Detroit 1

3 1' Rushing Offense
Ranks First in Nation

Holland High in Michigan. He
credits his first coach there, Ed
Damson as the one who inspired
him to go on in football, after
giving him a strong training in
the fundamentals of the game.
Three Offers
Partly because of this early
training, Farabee received three
college offers when he graduat-
ed from Holland. Besides Michi-
gan, Northwestern and Western
Michigan were after him. His de-
cision to attend Michigan was
based on several factors.
"Of course the academic stand-
ing at Michigan was a major
factor," says Farabee, "but it was
the coaching staff that really sold
me. I think the coaches here are
one of the main reasons athletes
choose Michigan.",
Another reason for Farabee's
choice of Michigan was the fact
that Michigan had finished the
1959 season with a losing 4 and 5
season, and the opportunity to
play looked good.
Likes Big Ten
"Finally, I had always had a
desire to play in the Big Ten,"
Farabee adds. "I still believe it
ranks with any football in the
country."
"Theyfriendships I've made on
the. team are one of the biggest
rewards," he says. "And the
thrill of playing against All-
Americans like Dick Butkus, Pat
Richter and Roger Staubach has
been another. You find that while
it's a real challenge to oppose
them, it isn't impossible to han-
dle them."
Upon graduation this spring,
Special
Today thru Sant.
49C &99c
Suits, Trousers
Dresses, Skirts
1 hr. service 9 a.m.-4 p.m.
KLEEN KING

Farabee hopes to utilize his la-
bor economics major in a career
of labor relations. He considers
his experience in football an im-
portant asset in his career.
"Football fits into any career,"
he says. "It teaches you many
things-one of the biggest is per-
severance."

4-3-2-1 basis:
1. Notre Dame (34) 8-0
2. Alabama (9) 9-0
3. Arkansas (2) 9-0
4. Nebraska 9-0
5. Texas 8-1
6. MICHIGAN 7-1
7. Ohio State 7-1
8. Louisiana State 6-1-1
9. Syracuse '7-2
10. Oregon 7-1-1
Other teams receiving

433
400
361
307
246
235
185
132
95
32
votes,

NBA
EASTERN DIVISION

Boston
x-Cincinnati
Philadelphia
New York
WESTERN]
Los Angeles
St. Louis
Baltimore
x-San Francisco
Detroit

W L Pct. GB
12 3 .800 -
8 6 .571 33%
6 7 .426 5
2 10 .167 8%
DIVISION
W L Pct. GB
10 4 .714 -
8 5 .615 1/%
8 8 .500 3
5 10 .333 5 f
410 .286 6

By The Associated Press
Michigan will be shooting for a
statistical title as well as the Big
Ten championship when it plays
Ohio State Saturday.
For the third straight week the
Wolverines are leading the nation
in rushing. Grounding out an av-
erage of 253.3 yards a game, the
powerful Michigan rushing attack
has been the key factor in bring-
ing the Wolverines a 7-1 record.-
Ranked fifth in total offense,
the Wolverines have chalked up a
total of 364.3 yards a game.
Following close behind Michigan
in rushing, Syracuse has driven
for 243.3 yards, a game, and Ne-
braska is averaging 242.1 yards
on the ground.

The Tulsa Hurricanes, led by
the accurate spirals of quarterback
Jerry Rhome, have pulled far out
in front of the pack in total of-
fense. The undefeated Hurricanes
have gained 475 yards a game.
Notre Dame, with an average of
409.6 yards to its credit, is Tulsa's
closest contender.
The Hurricanes, with two games
to play, already have surpassed
three NCAA major college records.
They have pitched for 2,604 yards,
202 completions, and 29 touch-
downs, wiping out two marks they
set in 10 games last year. Those
were 2,448 yards passing and 199
completions. Nevada in 1948 and
Kentucky in 1950 had 27 touch-
down passes.

GRID SELECTIONS

Competition for the title of all-campus champion football prog-
nosticator and a $10 gift certificate to Tice's Men's Shop, 1109 S. Uni-
versity, will be especially hot at 130 Cooley, East Quad-that's where
the winners of two of the earlier qualifying grid picks contests hang
there hats. Andrew Zarazajewski and Ron Fogle won tickets to the
Michigan Theatre earlier this year and thus became two of the nine
persons on campus eligible for this week's grand prize contest. The
unfortunate ones who are not eligible for this week's contest will have
to wait till next year.
THIS WEEK'S GAMES
1. MICH. at Ohio State (score) 11. Duke at North Carolina
2. Michigan State at Illinois 12. Stanford at California
3. Indiana at Purdue 13. Florida at Florida State
4. Minnesota at Wisconsin 14. Oregon at Oregon State
5. Iowa at Notre Dame 15. Southern California at UCLA
6. Air Force at Colorado 16. Kentucky at Tennessee
7. Yale at Harvard 17. Baylor at Southern Methodist
8. Kansas at Missouri 18. Memphis St. at So. Mississippi
9. Nebraska at Oklahoma 19. Washington at Washington St.
10. Pittsburgh at Penn State 20. Louisiana State at Tulane

listed, alphabetically: Arizona
State, Auburn, Florida, Florida
State, Georgia Tech, Illinois,
Minnesota, Oregon State, Penn
State, Princeton, Southern Cali-
fornia, Texas Tech, Tulsa, Utah,
Washington.
MeRink
Skating Card
The following is the public skat-
ing schedule at the Michigan Ice
Rink for the remainder of the
week:
Wednesday, Nov. 18-10 a.m. to
12 noon; 8 p.m. to 10 p.m. (adults
only).
Thursday, Nov. 19-10 a.m. to 12
noon.
Saturday, Nov. 21-10:30 a.m. to
12:30 p.m.
Special
Today thru Sat.
E 49c &99c
Suits, Trousers
Dresses, Skirts
i hr. service 9 a.m.-4 p.m.
KLEEN KING

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Baltimore 102, Boston 99
St. Louis 114, Philadelphia 107
x-Cincinnati at San Francisco (inc)

11

I

,OSINCE l&4&.
A fter SiYRUDOFKER
Playboy formal
The Campus favorite
from Coast to Coast
Styled with authority-made of wrinkle-
resistant, press-retaining Fortrel@ polyester-
comisco rayon material in a shawl collar
model. Satin tie and cummerbund, pleated
$: shirt with links and studs. The complete
combination ... $65. Suit only ... $55.

I

4. 5 E
: ..
t, .3;'
t

'4

finest quality laundry-

PANTS
SKIRTS
(plain)
SWEATERS
(plain)

55c

GO BLUE!
All-Campus Mixer
Everything's Coming Up
4 R!SES
Friday, Nov. 20, 9:00-12:00
South Quad Admission Free
Music by THE VAGRANTS

'4
'4
;. .
~.;
I:-

3' ~ .
4,
_4<
s. J '

A & P CLEANERS
312 E. Huron
across from City Hall
NO 8-9500

BUY IF YOU CAN, RENT IF YOU MUST.
QUALITY RENTALS
AT POPULAR PRICES.
STATE STREET AT LIBERTY

J

L-

I

ATTENTION-MEN UNDER 25!

i

Sentryreports

GOOD NEWS (AT LAST!) ABOUT CAR INSURANCE

1

FOR YOUNG MEN-MARRIED OR SINGLE-WHO QUALIFY

I

If you're under 25, you know what a big
extra premium you pay for car insurance.
Now, Sentry Insurance offers a 15% dis-
count for young men who qualify. (This
is in addition to Sentry's 15% discount
for driver education.)

HOW TO QUALIFY
Young men under 25 qualify for the Sentry Preferred Young Driver Discount on the
basis of a simple questionnaire that takes only about 20 minutes. It is not a test of
driving skill or knowledge. It is completely confidential. There is no penalty for young
men who do not qualify for the extra discount. Come to the center listed below to find
out what this can mean to you!

I

YOUNG MEN'S PILE-LINED
POPLIN JACKET... 13.95
"Whaler cloth" is the name of this rug-
ged poplin, and it's here in a casual
collegiate model with mandarin crew
neck, raglan shoulders, straight welt
pockets, and an adjustable 2-button
back tab. There's a snug tri-color pile
lining, too, and the entire jacket is
zelan treated to resist rain and stain.
Natural, pewter, black and burgundy in

LIABILITY. (single limit) ...... $25,000
MEDICAL PAYMENTS ........$ 1,000
UNINSURED MOTORISTS (Bodily Injury)
each person .............. $10,000
each accident .............$20,000

ANNUAL COST: (Local Area)

1. Under 25, single, not principal
operator; or married under
age 21 ...................$57.80
2. Married age 21 through 24 ... $52.02
3. Under 25, single, principal
operator .................. $96.82

n1

kwwl&T ACI AMI\T W T7IEm I

I I

I

1 l *r -6~ Looks out

A

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan