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November 14, 1964 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1964-11-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN D IAILY

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SA 'UKDAY, NUVL''MZLN 14, 1964

'DISTINGUISHED FACULTY'

PTP Plans
Talks with

Predicts Teaching Changes

'
I

Johnson Tapes Program
On Small Michigan Town

V

EDITOR'S NOTE: This is the
fifth of a series of articles on the
recipients of two University faculty
awards, the Distinguished Faculty
Achievement Award and the Dis-
tinguished Service Award.
By JOSEPH GAUGHAN
Prof. Paul Adrian Rondell of the
physiology department foresees a
time when teaching machines will
free a teacher to spend more time
with his individual students, help-
ing them develop their capacities
and their problems.
"Surely students and teachers
alike will be better and happier
when teachers present less infor-
mation and more inspiration," he
explained recently.
"I have been most interested
and most active in two kinds of
teaching: the essentially "one to
one' relationship of guiding re-
search projects of graduate stu-
dents and the near opposite, the
introduction of programmed learn-
ing with no necessary live contact
between student and instructor,"
Rondell said.
Programmed Learning
Programmed learning employs
self-instructional devices which
enable the student to study by
himself and at his own speed. Ma-
terial to be learned is reduced to
small steps, each step leading log-

medicine has expanded rapidly in SovietUnit
recent years, to the point where
many departments have divided The University's Profession
into still more departments-ail of Theatre Program will host a ser:
which must be given a piece of the of seminars conducted by men
student's time," he said. bers of the Moscow Art Theal
"Information Overload" Dec. 4-7.
"The luckless student is plagued The Soviet visitors will bei
by more facts, figures, ideas, the- Ann Arbor on a cultural exchan
ories and scraps of information mission sponsored by the Institu.
than any mortal can learn and of International Education a
retain," he said. the Department of State. The vi
Teaching machines will help the is being arranged in conjucti
medical student handle this "in- with performances by the Mosco
formation overload." Art Theatre in New York.
The seminars will include a a.:
Since programs are prepared cussion of the Stanislavsky Met
backwards, the programmer must od of dramatic training and
first carefully define what the stu- influence on contemporary wor
dent should be able to do when he theatre. A series of small semina:
finishes training. Thus, the teach- with drama majors and speec
er is almost forced to include only department faculty who special
the information necessary for this in the theatre will also be a pa
goal, Rondell said. ofte thoars
Revsin Pormof the program.
Revising Program Victor Manyukov, the directori
In view of the increasing course the Moscow Art Theater and
content, one particularly desirable teacher in the Theatre Schoo
feature of programmed education Vladimir Prokofyev, a former a
is that it is frequently faster than sociate of Stanislavsky; and Vw
conventional teaching methods, ily Toporkov, an actor who work
Rondell said. I under Stanislavsky are among t
"These ideas and proposals are Russians who will be in A
not dreams but are thoroughly Arbor.
worked out possibilities; all that The University is one of or
is required for us to do is to im- three schools that the Russi
plement them," Rondell said. authorities will visit.

nal
ies
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an

By CANDY EISENSTEIN
Ralph Johnson, producer of
WUOM, the University's FM radio
station, is taping a documentary
which will record the history of a
small Michigan town.
"A lot of American history exists
only in the minds of people Nome
60, 70 or 80 years old. If it is not
written, it will be lost forever
each time one of them dies,"
Johnson said.
He has chosen Durand, a town'
of 3000 people, about 50 miles from
Flint, as the object of his 55-
minute documentary. The voices
he records will be those of the
inhabitants rather than actors
or announcers.
Trace History
The documentary will trace Dur-
and's history chronologically, be-
ginning with its origin as a rail-
road switching point.
Many elderly people find life
in Durand much better today
than in the earlier days of saloons,
gambling, prohibition and te Ku
Klux Klan, Johnson said. At one
time, crosses were burned in the
streets and anti-immigrant feel-

ing ran high. Signs in business
establishments read: "If you don't
know English, learn it; if you do
know it, speak it."
To show how the city has de-
veloped, Johnson will interview
teachers, some of whom plan to
work in the new schools under
construction. Johnson will also
record one high school band he
feels is "extraordinarily good."
December Release
WUOM is financing this project
as part of its regular production
of special services. Johnson is do-
ing the work himself and expects
to release it by December.
By the end of his third visit
to Durand, he will have 20 to 30
hours of taped interviews which
must be edited to 50 mninutes of
talk. In addition to interviewing,
Johnson will spend two to three
days a week editing the tape.
The tape will be available to
other small town radio stations.
Johnson feels that if the Durand
documentary is successful and if
time, money and personnel are
available, WUOM might do similar
projects with other small com-
munities.

Across Campus
Prof. John B. Lansing, a pro- From 5 to 7" in the Architecture
gram director in the Survey Re-' Aud.
search Center, participated in the 8 p.m.-Soph Show will present
International Symposium on Air the musical comedy "Fiorello" in
Transport Economics, held re- the Ann Arbor High School Aud.
cently in Paris. A shuttle service running from the
Lansing presented a paper on steps of the Michigan Union to
"The Motivation of the Demand the high school will operate from
for Air Travel." 7:30 p.m. on. Tickets will be on
* * * sale one hour before show time

SATURDAY, NOV. 14
9 a.m.-The University's "Brush-
up" intercollegiate debate tourna-
ment will begin in Frieze Bldg.
10 a.m. - The Organization of
Arab Students is sponsoring an,
Arabian Art Exhibit featuring art-
ists Ismail and Tamam Sham-
mont in Rm. 3G of the Union.
1-5 p.m. and 7 p.m.-12:30 a.m.
-The Michigan Union and the
ISA will sponsor the second day
of the "World's Fair." There will
be exhibits in the, Union and
variety shows featuring audience
participation at 4, 7, 8, and 11
p.m. in the Union Ballroom.
5 and 9 p.m. - The PTP will
present the APA in Jean Gira-
doux's "Judith" at Lydia Mendel-
ssohn Theatre.
7 and 9 p.m.-The Cinema Guild
will present Agnes Varda's "Cleo

at the school box office.
8:30 p.m.-The Raduga Dancers
from the USSR will perform at
Hill Aud.
SUNDAY, NOV. 15
3 and 8 p.m.-The PTP will pre-
sent the APA in George Bernard
Shaw's "Man and Superman" at
the Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
7 and 9 p.m.-The Cinema Guild
will present Agnes Varda's "From
5 to 7" in the Architecture Aud.
8:30 p.m.-The School of Music
Arts Chorale and Women's Choir
Concert will be held in Hill Aud.
Maynard Klein will conduct.

PROF. PAUL RONDELL
ically to the next. The student will
not often repeat errors, for his
correct responses are reinforced
immediately.
This technique is especially val-
uable to medical students, Rondell
said.
"The medical student is pagued
with an unusually severe learning
challenge. Nearly every field in

1

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DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
i };,:;r-"{S:,"Y:i'::"}J:{}.. . . . . ..::.v: ::w"::".,.;" :r

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of The Univer-
sity of Michigan, for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 1564 Administration Bldg. be-
fore 2 p.M. of the day preceding
publication, and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on Request; Day
Calendar items appear once only.
Student organization notices are not
accepted for publication.
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 14
Day Calendar
Meeting of the Regional Science As-
sociation--Registration, Michigan Un-
ion, 8:30 a.m.

which may be sold to one individual The International Student Travel Lubrizol Corp., Cleveland. BS-MS:
is 8. Center Directors - will be in Ann Ar- ME. BS: ChE, non-citizens must have
e. The ticket line may not form bor Nov. 23 & 24. Any student inter- permanent visa, Dev., Des., Prod. &
more than two hours before tickets ested in working abroad for the sum- Sales.
go on sale. Organizations are not to mer should talk to them. Come to 212 National Cash Register Co., Dayton,
sell tickets to individuals who form SAB & sign up for one of 14 group Ohio. All Degrees: EE & ME. MS: ChE
a line previous to the two hour time meetings to be held both days. & IE, will consider non-citizens if be-
periodThat SGC enforce the above for coming a U.S. Citizen, R. & D. & Des.
the winter term, subject to review by American Student Information Serv-CUSA BS-MS: ChE
SGC. ice has sent us more appli. forms for US.-M:CE
European jobs. Students who want to Power Controls Div., Midland-Ross
procedures to organizations seeking I apply pick up forms in 212 SAB. Corp., Owosso, Mich. BS-MS: EE & ME.
ing SGC approval of concerts to be IBS: E Math, EM, E Physics & SciE.
held in Hill Auditorium for the win- ENGINEERING PLACEMENT INTER- Elec. Programming & Computing, men
term term. VIEWS - Seniors & grad. students, & women, R. & D. & Des.
please sign schedule posted at 128-H, Washington State Highway Comm.,
es g hu dt ng-HMany cities thruout state, BS-MS: CE,
tWest Engrg . . men & women, highway location, Des.
Wednesday, Nov. 18- &Constr. & Bridge Des.
U.S. Navy Bureau of Ships Hqrs.,
Announcement: ! Aerospace Corp., Several locations. Wash., D.C. BS-MS: EE, ME & Naval
Attn: Seniors, men - The Choate Ph.D. AE & Astro., Commun. Sci., EE, & Marine, men & women, cannot con-
School, Wallingford, Conn. in cooper- TM( ME, Nuclear, Astron., Math & Phy- sider students with ROTC commitment,
ation with Yale, announce the Yale- sics, Prof.: Applied Mech., R. & D., Des. Dev. & Des.
Choate Fellowship leading to the M.A. Cadillac Gage Co., Aerospace & Ord- U.S. Gov't Bureau of Reclamation,
in Teaching. Tuition, board & room, nance Div., Warren, Mich. All Degrees: thruout 18 Western States including
plus stipend. Grad Record Exam req. AE & Astro., ChE, EE, EM, ME & Met. Alaska. BS-MS: CE, EE & ME, men &
Application deadline Jan. 25 for follow- FS-PhD: Instrum. BS: Sci. Engrg. & women, R. & D. & Des.
ing school yr. Contact Bureau of Appts. E Phylsics, R. & D., & Des. Wednesday & Thursday, Nov. 18-19- ..
for details. Gulf Res. & Dev. Co., Pittsburgh, Pa. Aerospace Corp., several locations.
POSITION OPENINGS: MS-PhD: ChE, EE, ME. BS-MS: Ma- Ph.D., AE & Astro., Commun. Sci., EE,
Vinton Lee & Co., Wash., D.C. - Ac- terials. MS: Met. Men & Women, Can EM, ME, Nuclear, Astron., Math &
countants, exper in public acctg & tax consider non-citizens if permanent visa Physics. Prof.: Applied Mech. Men &
work &/or.. kPnrkwih can be obtained. R. & Dev. women, R. & D., Des.

The University of Michigan
Gilbert and Sullivan Society
presents
'"TRIAL BY JURY/"
and
"%THE SORCERER"1
Opening Thurs., Nov. 19th
TICKETS
AVAILABLE Fri., Nov. 20 8:00 p.m. TICKETS
SAB Sat., Nov.21 8:00p.m.1Thurs. $1.50
and Fri. & Sat. $2.00
Lydia (St. matinee 2:00 p.m. Sat. Mat. $1.00
LYDIA MEN DELSSOH N THEATRE

I

I

Pharmacy Day, Registration,
Chenistry-Pharmacy Building,
a.m.

1400
9:00

i
j
l
9
1
s

Doctoral Examination for Whitney
Wood Buck, Jr., English Language &
Literature; thesis: "Warren Burton:
Classmate of Emerson and Kindly Re-
former-at-Large," Saturday, Nov. 14,
2601 Haven Hall, at 9:00 a.m. Chairman
H. C. Barrows..
Astronomical Colloquim: Sat., Nov.
14, 2:30 p.m., McMath-Hulbert Observ-
atory, Lake Angelus. Dr. Richard O.
Teske, Dept. of Astronomy, will speak
on "Preliminary Results from a Dou-
ble-Pass Solar Spectograph."
Professor Jesse Pitt of the Sociolgy
Department of Wayne State University
will give a lecture on education in
France on Tuesday, Nov. 17 at 4:00 p.m.
in the Rackham Amphitheater. You are
invited to attend. This lecture is spon-
sored by the Department of Romance
Languages and the Alliance Francaise.
Flu Shots: There will be a "flu shot"
clinic at the Health Service Wednesday,
Nov. 18 from 8-11:30 a.m. and 1-4:30
p.m. The charge is $1.00 for students
and spouse and $1.50 for faculty, staff
and spouses.
NOTE: This will be the last "flu
shot" clinic this year.
General Notices
Summary of Action Taken by Student
Government Council at its Meeting of
November 11, 1964
Approved: 1. That SGC direct or-
ganizations seeking SOC approval of
concerts to be held in Hill Auditorium
to conform to the following procedures
for selling tickets.
a. Block ticket sales are to begin the
day of general ticket sales.
b. Students who buy a block for a
housing unit must have a letter of
authorization from the President of
the unit. Each housing unit. must
have a letter of authorization from the
resident of the unit. Each housing
unit may have no more than three
locks. Each individual standing in
ine may represent no more than one
lock.
c. The maximum number of tickets
ORGANIZATION
NOTICES
Use of This Column for Announce-
nents is available to officially recog-
tIzed and registered student organiza-
ians only. Forms are available in Room
l l SAD.
Alpha Phi Omega, Executive Board
neeting, Nov. 15, 2 p.m., Room 3510,
~tudent Activities Building.
Canterbury House, Sunday snacks,
iscussion. Dr. P. S. Jaini, Topic "Bud-
hism", Sunday, Nov. 15, 7:30 p.m.,
anterbury House, 218 North Division.
Voice - Chapter of SDS, Membership
eeting - Discussion of U.S. Involve-
ent in Underdeveloped countries and
ietnain, Nov. 16, at 7:30 p.m., Room
B, Michigan Union.
USE YOUR
IMAGINA'TION
Who t would you do with
photographs on cloth?
Personalize your sweatshirts,
sweaters? Use them for lamp-
eLhnrlne .. nave .-nnnn nse

LL

worx6Lfr ooxxepig t worxwit
CPA firm. Also positions for Jr. Acets.
Detroit Institute of Cancer Research-.
Virus Research Programs - man or
woman to assist in biochem investiga-
tions of infected cells. B.S. in Chem,
pref. minor in biol or microbiol.
Smith Klne & French Laboratories,
Philadelphia - Many openings includ-
ing 1. Corporate attorney, LLB, upper
13 of class, no exper req. 2. Mktg Re-.
search Analyst, B.A. or M.A. in Lib.
Arts, Bus. Ad., Psych., Econ, etc., no
exper req. 3. Advertising & Promotion
Writers, B.A. in Lib. Arts, Journ, Bus.
Ad., etc., on-the-Job trng. 4. Sr. Bio-
chemist, Ph.D. in Biochem, bkgd in
Physiol., 2 yrs post-doctoral exper pref.I
Several other opening for alumni or
Dec. grads.
* * *
For further info, please call 764-7460,
General Div., Bureau of Appts., 3200
SAB. Summer Placement: 212 SAB.
Manpower, Inc., 205 E. Liberty - Sur-
vey work, campus area, men with 8-12
hrs, avail. Nov. 18. Earn up to $15.60.
Must have good vision, legible hand-
writing & be able to work outdoors.
Apply at Manpower, Inc.
-finest quality laundry-
RAINCOATS
$2.0
cleaned and waterproofed
A,& P (LEANERS
312 E. Huron
across from City Hall
668 -9500j

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11

The University Musical Society

RICHARD PETER
BHLAI'URTON ! (Jr)OLEg'
H PANvION

DIAL 8-6416
Shows Continuous
from 1 p.m. today (X I M

All Seats $1.00
Any Time
This Show

Dial
662-6264
It's the Teen Ag,

Shows Start At
1:00 - 2:40 - 4:45
6:45 & 8:55
e Answer to Insomnia!

presents
"Die Fledermaus"
COMIC OPERA by JOHANN STRAUSS
(English Translation by RUTH & THOMAS MARTIN)
With The
NEW YORK CITY OPERA
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 8:30
IN HILL AUDITORIUM
(Special single performance)
TICKETS: $4.50-$4.00-$3.50-$3.00-$2.25-$1.50
UNIVERSITY MUSICAL SOCIETY-BURTON TOWER
(Phones: 665-3717 and 764-2538)

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FGBMF
Meeting
Time: SATURDAY, Nov. 14
at 7:30 P.M.
Place: The Michigan Union
University Club Dining Room
Speaker: Kermit Bradford, Past
Grand National President of Sigma
Delta Kappa, inter-Collegiate Law
Fraternity, World War I counter-
spy, Stunt Pilot, Movie Star, con-
verted to a Christian as a result of
successful handling of a famous
trial.
Everyone is invited to come.
Please bring a friend.

HELD W Shows at
OV E W 1,3, 5
Rock has Doris...
Just where she wants him....
~.DOMI$~ay
TO~dL ''NDaKz-
B3ND MeINO
LOWGRs

15

II

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9

Don 't Miss
THE WORLD'S FAIR
Only 12 Hours left to see the Unique Displays
3 BIG VARIETY SHOWS
at 7,9, 11 P.M.

Dial 5-6290*Tec~w.icoor *

I I

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smmimmu *etmmmminmmumminwmmmmm..mm mmmininmu *mimmmmmmmmmmmminminmmu...
TONIGHT & TOMORROW: CLEO FROM 5 to 7
A spoiled and egotistical woman searches for life and love
while tormented by the spectre of approaching death. u
S M00
* ~ L3A E

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