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October 29, 1964 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1964-10-29

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 29, 1964

PAGE TWO THE MICHIGAN DAILY THURSDAY, OCTOBER 29, 1964

Robertson Views 'U' Projects

Governmental Divisions
Vary Executive Training

ACROSS CAMPUS:
Band Alumni Award Honor Citations

Paper Praises 'U'
Honors Students
By BRUCE BIGELOW
Honors students desire the ex-
citement of intellectual discovery
as .well as the assimilation of fac-
tua;. knowledge, according to
James H. Robertson, associate
dean of the literary college.
This is one of several conclu-
sions Robertson drew in a paper
written last spring during a leave
of;- absence from the University.
The paper, documented by find-I
ings of -a local survey of honorsf
students in 1961, is scheduled forj
publication next spring under the
sponsorship of the National In-
ter-University Committee on the;
Superior Student.

Dean Describes
Foreign Exchange

Five persons were honored atI

By CAL SKINNER, JR.

tent on how his fellow workers the Minnesota football game
react to him when he returns to the University Band Alumni
work. ganizati-on.

by
or-

4
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{
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7

By CHERYL SCHWARTZ The United States Bureau of the
Budget and the Civil Service Com-
The University offers its stu- mission first began to require jus-
dents one of the most nationally tification for initiation of their
successful junior year abroad pro- sagency executive training pro-
grams for study in France, James 1grams in 1960.
H. Robertson, associate dean of Since then, emphasis. has been
the literary college, said recently. I.shifted from individual training to
"The program's results have improvement of the inter-person-
been so favorable that this year ,al relations between members of
a second program was initiated in work groups, says Prof. Gordon
Freiburg, Germany by the Univer- L. Lippitt, director of the center
sity, the University of Wisconsin for behavioral sciences at George
and Wayne State University," he Washington University.
said. Speakingat a social seminar of
Robertson said he feels that the the Institute of Public Adminis-
University's program surpasses tration, Lippitt noted that such
Univrsiy's rogam srpasestraining programs for federal ad-
those of other schools because of'minintogrms oraeelem-
many u n i q u e characteristics. ministors used to have little im-
Amon thee i itsselctio ofpact on the federal bureaucracy.
Among these is its selection of However, since 1960 developments.
honors calibre" students who suggest that the training pro-
have an adequate language skill
and who show promise to improve tive because of a change in the
this skill by participation in class- cagfith
P nrAi -.nfiriivery concept of training.

No longer is "showing movies The national organization metj
and teaching classes" to individ- during Homecoming activities for
uals from diverse work situations its annual "Blast from the Past"
enough. Now programs are aim- and gave honorary citations to
ed at entire working units from Prof. George Cavender, assistant
an agency. The courses attempt director of University Bands, and'
to develop problems that might be Prof. James Salmon of the mu-
faced by the group in its every- sic school. Cavender was cited for
day work and to point the way to "continuing to add fame and pres-
their solutions. tige to the outstanding tradition
of the Michigan bands." Salmon
was honored for "being vitally in-
tch o s terested in the University bands-_
contributing to their outstanding
Ponder Single traditions as a student and teach-
Named honorary band alumni
were: Bennie Oosterbaan, former
head football coach; Donald
(Continued from Page 1) "Monk" Watson, and Frederick E.
Moncrieff, manager of University
IeThe joint budget request was News Service. Oosterbaan was hon-
seen as a significant stride in in- ored for being "an invaluable as-
stitutional cooperation. The coor- set to his Alma Mater"; Watson
dinating council was organized on as being "a great friend of the
an optimistic note in 1962, but its University bands," and Moncrieff
'" dn..,.., hnv i d ittIIL a . d d

and Computer Interaction" in Rm. of the Institute of Public Admin-
1057 of the Mental Health Re- istration on "Are You Aware:
search Institute Bldg. China-Of Its People on Campus?"
4 p.m.-Prof. H. F. Schurmann in the Multi-Purpose Rm. of the
of the Universiwy of California at UGLI.
Berkley will speak on "How to 8 p.m.-The PTP will present
Survive and Prepare for the Fu- the APA in George Bernard Shaw's
ture: Reflections on Communist , Man and Superman" in Lydia
China Today" in Rm. 200, Lane Mendelssohn Theatre.
Hall. 8 p.m.-Young Citizens for
4:10 p.m.-Paul van Buren, pro- Johnson rally featuring Josh
fessor of theology at Temple Uni- White and Eric Goldman, special
versity, will speak on "The Chal- assistant to President Johnson,
oersity p a ryn "theo hTra- will be held in the Ann Arbor
lenge of Contemporary to Tr-High School Aud.
ditional Theology: The Challenge

>

- a

"Despite persistent rumors to DEAN JAMES ROBERSTON
the: contrary," Robertson states, For an example to back his as-
"honors istudents seek much more Franempetbckhss-
than is -offered in the average ed- sumption, Robertson points to the
sin-high percentage of honors stu-
ucatdoal exposition. They arein dents engaged in positions of cam-'
cerely desirous of a stimulating pslaesi.
and activating experience, where- pus leadership.
by they may be directly involved Robertson describes four addi-
in the learning process." tional misconceptions of the per-

es ana aciivi es aL a foreign uni--
versity.
Few Americans

Previous to 1960, training pro-
grams had been based on human
rela tinns theor which sometimes

i

of Security" in the Multipurpose'
Rm. of the UGLI.
7 p.m.-Richard C. Jelineck of
Hospital Administration of the In-
dustrial engineering department
will speak on "Nursing: The De-
velopment of an Activity Model" in
Rm. 70, Business Administration
Bldg.
7 and 9 p.m.-Cinema Guild will
p resen t Somerset Maugham's
"Rain" in the Architecture Aud.
7:30 p.m.-Prof. Horace Dewey,
acting director of the Center for
Russian Studies, will moderate a
panel discussion on "The Change
in Soviet Leadership" in the Mich-
igan Rm. of the Women's League.
Participating in the panel will be
Marian Low and Prof. Alfred
Levin, both of the history depart-
ment, Prof. William Medlin of the
education school and William
Zimmerman of the political science
department.
7:30 p.m.-The International
Students Association will present a
discussion led by Prof. William
Gable of the political science de-
partment and associate director

FRIDAY, OCT. 30
7 and 9 p.m.-Cinema Guild
presents Somerset Maugham's
"Rain" in the Architecture Aud.
8 p.m.-The PTP presents the
APA in George Bernard Shaw's
"Man and Superman" in Lydia
Mendelssohn Theatre.
8:30 p.m.-About 9 fraternities
and ten supporting sororities will
perform in the Inter-Fraternity
Council Sing at Hill Aud. First,
second and third prizes will be
awarded.
MICHIGAN
SWEAT SHIRTS
ALL SIZES
ALL COLORS
$2.98
at
FOLLETT'S

Satisfaction

sonal characteristics of honors stu-

Robertson's paper states that dents. He also notes the wide de-f
honors students feel a sense of gree of acceptance these beliefs;
satisfaction and self-fulfillment in: have obtained.
being able to explore problems
and uncover solutions by their l "First, honors students have'
own initiative. "By being actively been conceived as intellectual 'lon-
involved, they satisfy their per- eis, separated from all aspects of
sonal desire to use their capabili- social life," Robertson says. "Sec-
ties to the fullest extent." ond, they have been pictured as
grossly impractical. Third, they
Robertson also stresses the in- have become synonomous with the
structor's:responsibility to provide word 'off-beat.' And finally, they
the necessary stimulation for the have been seen as images of phys-
student. "He must be willing to ical timidity."
share his experiences; and he He urges critics to attempt fair-
must invite the student to come er understanding of honors stu-
along on a mutual road of dis- dents, in the light of their inti-
covery." mate personal needs. "In so.far
In other portions of the paper, as personal goals and expectations
Robertson deals with several con- are concerned," Robertson con-
temporary misconceptions con- cludes, "there is little difference
cerningthe role of university between honors students and all
honors students. other students. Both are plagued
Personal Intertsts with similar problems and anxie-
"The personal interests of hon- ties."
ors students have, been generally Thus Robertson emphasizes the
conceived as purely academic in "humanness" of honors students.
character," Robertson reports. "The underlying misconception has
"Yet, the results of the University been to see the honors student as
survey show that honors students a sort of 'extra-human' person.
actually entertain a great variety But in order to accurately under-
of interests in the non-academic stand his role, critics must real-
sphere." ize that he is normal."
ORGANIZATION NOTICES
-

irui Iuy wlu 6~~u1C ounaers nave aamiuea many ais- }
Because this plan places Amer- went to the extreme of suggesting appointments since that time.
ican students in universities with that being happy and well adjust- Although the 10 schools were
relatively few Americans, and be- ed on one's job was the goal of able to hammer out a joint speak-
cause all classes are taught in the personnel training. The "happi- er ban unanimously acceptable,
language of the hosting country, ness school" fell into disfavor the council has more often been
tendencies to form "little Ameri- when social scientists showed that a center of controversy.
cas" disappear, Robertson explain- to be productive on one's job, When the University sought en-
ed. one need not like one's fellow dorsement of its proposal to es-
Mingling is also encouraged by workers. tablish a branch in the Saginaw
the housing arrangements. Some This emphasis on productivity Bay area in 1962, the council re-t
students live in the university dor- fused prompting University Presi-
mitories with the native students dent Harlan Hatcher to walk out
and others live with selected fam- ! Cybernetic Sexaof theumeeting. u
ilies in the area. They've finally computerized Last year, the council memberst
Co-sponsoring the program with love. Last week, 121 Boston signed a long-range pact on medi-
Wisconsin and Wayne allows the University coeds were "match- cal education in the state, but
University to pool its resources and ed" by computer to 121 Dart- President Hatcher and Michigan
choose two effective faculty mem- muhmnadsipdt State University President John
bers to accompany the group Dartmouth by bus. Hannah later accused each othert
abroad. Prior to their cybernetic in- of misunderstanding the terms.
Two Duties troduction, all 242 participants However, last year marked the
One faculty member serves as had filled out questionnaires de- first time that the schools made a
the educational director, handling scribing their ideal dates. The joint effort to obtain funds from
housiduatnadviscorproblemsexperiment was described as the Legislature. Officials expressed
while the other joins the foreign very successful." enthusiasm on the success of theirl
university as a visiting professor, It sure must be lonely at efforts later.
conducting classes in English for Dartmouth. Uniting around a citizen's report
only French or German students. on higher education which advo-
The participating student abroad is reflected in the new approaches cated substantial education in-
remains a resident of his Ameri- to training programs. Instead of creases, council members played
can school so that his credits wil. merely "giving an employe a va- an active role in the governor's
transfer and any scholarships he cation," training courses are now decision to seek a $21 million in-
would have ordinarily received will being forced to justify themselves crease for the schools-an un-
apply. on the basis of increased produc- precedented recommendation.
The program sends 40 students tivity when employes return to The coordinating council was
to Aix-en-Province and 45 to Frei- their jobs. organized in 1962 to undertake co-
burg. "Participation is not re- To accomplish this objective, ordination of statewide programs,'
stricted to language majors," Rob- federal personnel men are be- plans for the "orderly develop-4
ertson said. ginning to realize a vital fact: ment" of higher education in the
Strong encouragement is also how a program graduate applies state and disseminate information
given to students in other fields, what he has learned in the train- regarding the financial needs of
such as philosophy, art history, ing course depends to a great ex- the member schools.
political science, humanities and
in mathematics and sciences, Rob- - y-4-
ertson said. TODAY:4:1 Promtl
Prof. Roy Pierce of the politi- Arena Theatre Frieze Building
cal science department will pro-
vide details of the program for
interested students.
ONE sAYeMsR

fnr he ma~ v vc he a ~ clitiiv.

I

ed his talents for the service and
betterment of the University
bands."
Prof. Donald L. Katz of the
chemical and metallurgical engi-
neei'ing department has been
awarded the 1964 John Franklin
Carll Award of the Society of Pe-
troleum Engineers. One of the
society's top prizes, the award
was presented for Katz's "im-
portant pioneering research on
the critical propel ties of hydro-
carbon systems and the perform-
ance of petroleum reservoirs." The
award citation also mentions his
"outstanding activity" as educa-
tor, consultant, and contributor to
petroleum literature.
THURSDAY, OCT.29

JOINT JUDICIARY COUNCIL
Petitioning now open
- I-'L_ - "*. ' 'I e A

9:30-7:30 a.m.-Paul van Buren, 'vctober It
professor of theology at Temple
University, will be in the Michigan
Union Grill. Petitions available it
2:15 p.m.-J. C. R. Licklider of room 1 011 Student .4
International Business Machine Building
laboratories will speak on "Man

bth to JUtn, 1704

Activities

Five vacancies
to be filled.

I

lomplar"w

ENDING TONIGHT
TWO WONDERFUL
COMEDIES RETURN

j }
r 14 '

DIAL 8-6416
One of the Most Enchanting
Films of All Time!

I

Use of This Column for Announce-
nents is available to officially recog-
nized, and registered student organi-
zations only. Forms are available in
Room 1011 AB.
* . *
-Cervantes Club, Weekly meeting, folk
music, guitar playing, spontaneous
group singing, musica y canciones lat-
inas, Oct. 29, 8-10 p.m., Room 3N, 3rd
floor,Michigan Union.
* * *
Christiain Science Organization, Meet-
log, Thurs., Oct. 29, 7:30 p.m., Room
528D, BAB.
* * *
International Students Association,
Cultural series, China Week, Oct. 28,
7:30 p.m. in the Multipurpose Room of
the Undergraduate Library. Speaker:
Dr. William Gable will speak on China's
political outlook, Oct. 30, 7 p.m., in the
International Center, folk and cultural
party.
Joint Judiciary. Council, Petitioning
is now open for five student members
of the Joint Judiciary Council. The
deadline date, Oct. 30, 1964. Petitions
are available in Room 1011 AB.

University of Michigan Student Em-
ployes' Union, special membership
meeting, Oct. 29, 7:30 p.m., Room 3D
Michigan Union.
* * *
WAA Folk Dance Club, Folk dance
with instruction suitable for beginners
Fri., Oct. 30, 8-10:30 p.m., Women's
Athletic Bldg.
* * *
Young Democrats, Young Citizens for
Johnson Rally: Featured entertainer
Josh White, variety of other enter-
tainment. Speaker, Prof. Brie Goldman,
special assistant to the President pro-
fessor, Princeton University, Oct. 291
8 p.m., Ann Arbor High School Aud.
American Society for Public Admin-
istration, Coffee hour. Speaker fron
Bureau of the Budget. Topic, "Ap.
pointment in the Executive Branch,'
Oct. 30, 4 p.m., Graduate Outing Room
Rackham.
S* w
Newman Student Association, Dis
cussion: "Is Sex a Part of Christiar
Love?" Fr. Schevermann, Oct. 30, 7:3f
p.m.; 8:30 p.m., square dance and hay
ride, 331 Thompson St.

1.
IT

DIAL 662-6264
SHOWS AT 1-3-5-7 & 9:05

By Joseph Conrad
Department of Speech
Student Laboratory Theatre
Admission Free

7-,Il

STILL MANY SEATS LEFT!
JOINT GLEE CLUB CONCERT
Place Your Block Ticket Order

PREMIERE - OCT. 28, 8 P.M.
by George Bernard Shaw
Directed by Stephen Porter
Joseph Bird
raj Ronald Bishop
Clayton Corzatte
Poadd Croft
K'ene Curtis
Gordon Gould
Jennifer Harmon
Rosemary Harris
Nancy Marchand
Paul Sparer
Ellis Rabb
Joanna Roos
Richord Woods
A Delightful, Witty
/cc Battle of the Sexes.
(C
= t
Settings and Lighting designed by Kim Swados
Costumes designed by Nancy Potts

ComE Bow.
YOUR NORm
20 !! TECNNIC0L0u'Itlt5
LEE MOLLY BARBARA JILL
COBB -PICON -RUSH -STJON
SHOWN AT 1:10-5:10-9:10
AND i
+,,MES LIVE IN TECHNICOLORY
Shown at 3:10
and 7:10 Only
FRIDAY
"FATE IS
THE HUNTER"

M-.G-M d-

starring
LESLIE CARON - MEL FERRER JEAN PIERRE AUMONT
with ZSA ZSA GABOR- KURT KASZNAR' TECHNICOLOR*

1

TA1nAV J TAUADDAW

Iun an[III111

ii

General

S..
SalI

R IvrKVInVU
es Begin Nov. 2

I

p. ii i ii i um m miniii mmmin ini iiimu in mmmmii~uIli i iinuin mu*mmi nmmmma
*
Sadie Thompson Vamps Reverend Tonight and Tomorrow
!I
a
II For Program unforormton
INU THE ARCHITECTURE AUDITORIUM
ADMISSION: FIFTY CENTS
--i! - - - --m- - - - --r-- - - --? im iinin im m i nmmmmmmmu - -mi i nu

4

HEY GUYS!!
Don't Tell Me You Aren't
Bringing Your Dates
to
MUFUN
AT THE UNION
Friday, Oct. 30 ... 8-12 p.m.

TECHNICOLOR.*I -1 i., in.& ..E .
1__ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ I' . iA

I,

I

TONIGHT at 7:30!
THE CHANGE
IN
SOVIET LEADERSHIP
A PANEL DISCUSSION

SOPH s1oW
GENERAL TICKET SALES

Tickets on sale for the evenings of
TUEnI AV YWnV 17

MISS MARIAN LOW

DR. WILLIAM MEDLIN

.

I

.9

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