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October 24, 1964 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1964-10-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 24, 1964

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

V A CIc Q V'17'r?.T l

THE MICHIGAN DAILY W~ * I9U~ ~

YAUE SEVEN

!Wolverines

Look

to

'Homecoming'

0

f Brown Jug
eg
History of Minnesota Series
Recalls Humor, Heartbreak

By GARY WYNER fornia the next week, 26-20; edged MINN
Associate Sports Editor Northwestern, 21-18; and lost last Kent Kramer
Thle Big Ten race, the Little week to conference champion Il- Don Rosen (2
The Bg Te rac, theLitte liois,14-10.PalFut(1
Brown Jug, and an attempt to gPaul Faust (21
break a four-year Wolverine los- Sil Smarting Frank Marchle
ing streak to the Gophers are on Still smarting from last week's Randy Staten(
display today as Michigan hosts 21-20 upset loss to Purdue and Gale Gillingha
Minnesota before an expected subsequent tumble from the na- Aaron Brown(
Homecoming crowd of 65,000. tional top ten, the Wolverines have John Hankins
won their first three encounters JonH kis
Michigan enters the. regionally thear-Air Fore 2n-7,nNavs Fred Farthing
tel this year-Air Force, 24-7, Navy,
televised game with a 3-1 season 121-0, and Michigan State 17-10. Ray Whitlow (
record, 1-1 in the conference, while Today's contest will mark the Mike Reid (200
Minnesota is also 1-1 in league 49th battle for the coveted Little age and scored t
play, 2-2 overall. Both coach Bump Brown Jug, which hais been in n teassingedt
Elliott of Michigan and Murray BonJg hc a eni In the passing de
Warmath of Minnesota regard th the Gopher's possession for the inson has an ii
game as a "must" to remain in past four years. Micnigan last cent completion
game nas n a "msth Bt e mairn i beat M innesota in 1959, Elliott's gcod for 426 yar
contention for the Big Ten crown. 'first year as head coach, b a 14- lies.
Minnesota lost its opening game 6 margin. Since then, the staunch lies.
to Nebraska, 26-21; beat Cali- defensive units of, the Gophers Halfba
have helped defeat the Wolverines, Halfback Bill
10-0, 23-20, 17-0, and 6-0. J Gopher's top br
Strong Passer was injured last
Minnesota's offense centers not expected to
around quarterback John Hankin- afternoon, which
son, whom Michigan end coach
Jocko Nelson considers the bestn.
passer the Gophers have had in,
recent years. Hankinson came into
his own two weeks ago as he Stan4
led his team to the victory over
Northwestern.
In last week's loss to Illinois,: w L
Hankinson sustained a mild con- osu 2 0 1.'
cussion on the first play from Purdue 2 0 1.
scrimmage and failed to return Illinois 2 1 .
to the lineup the remainder of the MICH. 1 1
afternoon. His condition has since Minnesota 1 1 .
proved and he is expected to Wisconsin 1 1.
}rnstairt odaIndiana 1 3 .
sattoday. N'western 12.
Hankinson is both a good iun- Mich. St. 0 2 .
ner and passer, and fits right into TODAY'S
the Minnesota's strong multiple Minnesota at MICE
offense which has averaged 275 UCLA at Illinois
yards per game. He has carried the Northwestern a
KENT KRAMER ball 27 times for a 3.5 yard aver- Wisconsin at Ohio

ESOTA
(230)
25)
0)
wski (225)
(215)
m (225)
(235)
on (185)
(195)
160)
0)

LE
LT
LG
C
RG
RT
RE
QB
LH
RH
FB

MICHIGAN
Steve Smith
Charles Kines
Dave Butler
Brian Patchen
John Marcum
Tom Mack
John Henderson
Bob Timberlake
Jim Detwiler
Carl Ward
Mel Anthony

hree touchdowns..
epartment, Hank-
mpressive 53 per
record, 31 of 58,
-ds and three tal-
ck Out
Crockett, the
reakaway threat,
week also and is
see action this
is a .,w to the

Ten
dings
Conference
Pct. PF PA
000 43 9
000 49 27
666 31 32
.500 37 31
500 42 51
500 21 32
500 38 49
.333 38 51
250 69 72
000 30 44

(230)
(230)
(215)
(205)
(205)
(220)
(185)
(210)
(210)
(180)
(200)

Gophers. His replacement will be
Fred Farthing, who asually is the
first team fullback.
Farthing led all Gopher ball
carriers in yards per carry last
year and is once again the work-
horse of the offense. This season
he has carried 43 times for 186
yards.
His runningmate at left half
this afternoon is another speed-
ster-160-pounder Ray Whitlow.
Whitlow has done little running so
far, but his major asset is that
he's a threat on deep passes. He's
caught five aerials for 109 yards
this season.
Ends Kent Kramer and Aaron
Brown are the topnoten receivers
who give the Minnesota passing
game its punch. Kramer has snar-
ed eight passes for 1g8 yards and
one touchdown while his counter-
part, Brown, has caught 12 aerials
for 123 yards and two scores.
The Gopher defense is consid-
ehed "big and strong" but the ab-
sence of ends John Rajala and
tackle Fred Nord, who were in-
jured earlier in the year, have
hurt it.
The Gophers will have a diffi-
cult time containing the awesome

i
E
I
f
t
3
1
f

offense of the Wolverines Michi- ceptions, and junior ends Craig
gan places sixth in the nation in Kirby and Steve Smith with six
total offense and seventh in the catches apiece.
rushing department atone. The Wolverine defense is rated
Senior quarterback Bob Tim- one of the best in the conference
berlake is the sparkplug of a back- against opponent's ground attacks
field that is averaging 237 yards and is listed as the best pass de-
per game on the ground. fense in the league.
Leading Rusher Key Injuries
Timberlake is the team's lead- Key injuries during the Purdue
ing ground gainer averaging 4.8 game last week were sustained by
yards per carry with senior full- defensive specialists guard Rich
back Mel Anthony and sopho- Hahn and linebacker Barry Deh-
more halfbacks Carl Ward and lin, though. Both are out for the
Jim Detwiler each averaging over remainder of the season. Sopho-
four yards a carry. mores Bob Mielke and Frank Nun-
The passing game has been just ley will most likely fill in these
enough to keep the opponet's de- gaps.
fense honest, according to rival Timberlake's versatility has also
coaches. Timberlake has com- made him the team's leading
pleted 32 of 64 attempts for 464 scorer. He's scored a total of 30
yards and two touchdowns. His points this year on three touch-
leading receivers have been senior downs, six conversions, and two
end John Henderson with 12 re- field goals.

By BOB LEDERER
The Gophers of Minnesota meet
the Wolverines of Michigan today
in the 49th renewal of the Little
Brown Jug contest, the grand-
daddy of football rivalries.
History has it that when the
famed Fielding H. Yost took one
of his "point-a-minute" football
teams to do battle with Minnesota
in 1903, he was so disgusted with
settling for a 6-6 tie that he threw
away the team's water bucket.
Yost's disgust can easily be un-
derstood. In 1901 Michigan went
undefeated in 11 games and com-
piled 550 points to its opponents'
none. In 1902 Michigan again
went undefeated amassing 644
points to 12 for its opponents. On
that day in 1903, Yost couldn't
foresee anything short of a lop-
sided victory.
Oscar Munson, the Minnesota
equipment manager, picked up the
bucket and hung it above his desk
where it remained unnoticed for.
six years. In 1909 when Yost again
took a team to Minneapolis, he
demanded the bucket back. A
"Come and Get It" reply initiated
the now-famous tradition.

M' Rooters Host Toledo;
Team Seeks First Win

The original bucket, or jug, was
purchased for 20 cents and its
color was putty, not brown. One
year it was broken, and Yost and
Munson each purchased a new
one. Munson's jug resembled the
original more and so his was re-
tained. Why the jug is called
little (it holds five gallons of
water) and brown, no one seems
to know.
Michigan holds a 30-17 edge in
the series which, in 25 of its games,
has seen the victor emergeswith a
margin of six or less points.
One game is readily recalled by
sports fans. In 1947 the awesome
Leo Nomellini anchored the Goph-
er line which nearly beat the
strong Wolverines, who were led
by All-Americans Bob Chappius
and Bump Elliott. Michigan fin-
ally triumphed 13-6 and went on
to an undefeated season and a
Rose Bowl victory.
Another famous incident con-
cerns Tom Harmon, the All-
American Wolverine end who
played from 1938-1940. Harmon
scored 33 touchdowns in three
years for a Big Ten record and
yet never scored against Minne-
sota.

All
Games
W L
4 0
3 1
3 1
3 1
3 1
2 2
2 2
2 3
1 3
1 3

S GAMES
HIGAN
dichigan State
DState

OLYMPICS NEAR FINISH:
U.S. Victories Assure Gold Medal Edge

Michigan's soccer club still seeks
the first win of its intercollegiate
career tomorrow when it hosts the
University of Toledo, 2 p.m. at
Wines Field.
The contest will mark the re-
turn of intercollegiate soccer to
Michigan, but for the first time
on an undergraduate level. Al-
though the club does not have
varsity status, the teams with
which it competes are varsities.
The Michigan booters are 0-2
for the season, after a 6-0.defeat
at the hands of Denison, and a
7-5 overtime loss to Wooster. The
loss to Wooster was particularly
heartbreaking as Michigan led
through most of the contest until
the Fighting Scots tied it up 5-5
late in the last period. As the
overtime started so did the rain
and wind, and the kickers proved
unable to move well against the
wind in the mud. Wooster scored
twice on long shots to take the
victory.
Toledo, also in its first season,
has fared little better, dropping
their first game 4-3 to the Akron
junior varsity and their second 8-5
to Fenn. Toledo did manage a tie

Leading Scorer
Michigan's leading scorer, Adolf
Armbruster, will start at center.
forward and face Toledo's high
scorer, Barabaz; each man has
three goals. Mario Winter, with
one tally to his credit, will start
at left wing for Michigan, with
Robert Peters, Dieter Stefan-
kovic, and Warren Shear filling
out the offense.
The defense will have Dave
Coghlan, Perry Hood, and Dick
Scheer at halfback, and Dick
Hendrickson and Pete Skolnik at
the fullback spots. Michigan's
goalkeeper, Pete Roeper, was
given credit by the Wooster play-
ers and coach as "the best goalie
we've ever faced."
The game tomorrow comes after
a three-week period with no com-
petition, giving the club a chance
to recover from several injuries
incurred at Wooster. Four more
games remain on the slate after
tomorrow's, two more being home
matches.

last weekend in their "best
so far" according to coach
Thompson, again with the
JV's.

Homecoming Sunday
10:30 a.m. THE CRUCIBLE
7:00 p.m. TWENTIETH CENTURY
REFORMATION
calvin malefyt, speaking
University Reformed Church
East Huron by Rackham

effort
Lance
Akron

TOKYO (T)-The stage was set
for the Olympic flame to be ex-
tinguished at the Tokyo Games
today after the U.S. basketball
team crushed Russia 73-59 and
a salughterhouse skinner f r o m
Philadelphia capped America's
best showing in four Olympics
against the Soviet Union by win-
ning the heavyweight boxing
championship.
One equestrian event, some tra-
ditional pomp and the snuffing
out of the flame that has burned
for 15 days remained before the
accounting in the gigantic sports
extravaganza that attracted more
than 7,000 athletes from 94
nations.
But for the United States and
Russia the battle ended yesterday
when America held onto its lead
in gold medals, despite a steady
tide of skilled gymnasts and

strong boxers who carried the
Soviet Union past the United
States in total medals for the
third straight Olympics.
Jackson Leads Way
The United States, which built
its medal lead. in the prestige
track and swimming events, added
to its laurels as Lucious Jackson
of Pan American College led the
basketball team past the Russians
and Joe Frazier annexed the
heavyweight boxing crown by out-
pointing Germany's Hans Huber.
Those were America's only two
medals for the day and lifted the
U.S. total to 90-36 gold, 26 silver
and 28 bronze. The Russians grab-
bed 19 medals, many in sports
considered minor in the United
States, and wound up with 96,
including 30 gold, 31 silver and 35
bronze.
It was, the best showing for the

United States since the 1952
Games at Helsinki when the Rus-
sians first entered a team in the
Olympics and lost the medal
battle.
The American medal total was
the highest achieved in the four.
Olympic struggles against the
Soviets and the 36-30 superiority
in gold medals represented the
first time since 1952 that the ,
United States had edged the Rus-
sians in that department.
U.S. Superiority
On the basketball court, the:
United States once aain establish-
ed its superiority over Russia
while keeping intact America's
unblemished Olympic record in the
sport. The victory was the ninth
straight in these Games for the
United States and the 47th over-
all since basketball was placed on
the Olympic program in 1936.
This fourth straight battle with
the Russians in the final was sup-
posed to be the toughest. Both;
teams had built 8-0 records. The
Russians were said to have their;
strongest aggregation while there
had been some uncomplimentary
comparisons between this U.S.-
team and previous American
squads.
For a couple of minutes, it
seemed the critics were right. But
Jackson began to dominate the
boards, pushed in some points and
by half time the United States had
bolted to a comfortable 39-31 lead.

It got even more comfortable in
the second half.
"We went into the game scared
-we were nervous at first," said
Hank Iba, the U.S. coach. "I've
been in this business a long time.
I know if you get so sure you're
going to win, you usually get
knocked on your bottom."
Jackson, with 17 points, and
Joe Caldwell of Arizona State,
with 14, led the scorers while
Larry Brown of Okron, Ohio, Walt
Hazzard of UCLA, Jerry Shipp of
Bartlesville, Okla., and Bill Brad-
ley of Princeton contributed their
efforts against the veteran Rus-
sian team.
"They've got a good club, a
strong club," said jubilant coach
Iba after the game.
'AGreat Team'
"But we've got a great team, and
they played a great game."
Meanwhile Frazier, employing
a good left hook to advantage
against his taller German oppo-
nent, was tagged with several
sharp rights but stung Huber con-
tinually with lefts to the face and
took the decision on the score-
cards of three of the five judges.
Scores
Geo. Washington 21, Wmn. & Mary 0
Indiana 28, Miami (Fla) 14
Detroit 21, Dayton 6
AFL
Boston 24, Kansas City 7

CO MEA

ro)

CHRl JiCHr

Regents Approve New Plans
For Multiple-Purpose Arena

UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER

7 b

fb%3rr

(Continued from Pegs 1)
made possible by the proposed ex-
tension of the tunnel that runs
under Michigan Stadium from the
field to the dressing rooms. The
tunnel will be extended to the
dressing rooms of the University
Events building. This is practicable
because of the proximity of the
two structures and the common'
elevation of both so that the
ground-level locker rooms can be
connected.
The building will be on an em-
bankment with entrances to the
seats at the horizontal walkway
that is half-way up the oval in- l
terior. The 'exterior will be pri-1
marily constructed of concrete and
bricks rising to a roof which has
a double inclination up to its
top.
Since the building will be used
for many musical performances, a
study of its acoustics was made.
Bolt, Beranek, and Newman, Inc.
studied Hill Auditorium's sound
system and will install what Pier-{
pont terms "a complete sound
system appropriate for the build-
ing."
University President HarlanE
Hatcher hailed the building as "an
overwhelming asset to our in-
stitution. It will be a beautiful
experience to see the University
Events Building blending in with
the architecture of Michigan Sta-
dium and the University Golf
Course," he said.
The first major step was taken
toward the construction of the
building when the Regents inform-
ed the Athletic Board that it could
appoint a plant expansion com-
mittee to determine what type of
building would be most ap-
propriate. Although the main pur-
pose of the structure was to be
for basketball games, it was also
stipulated by the Regents that1
the building be capable of housing
commencement, large convoca-
tions, and student entertainment.
At the Regents' monthly meet-
ing in February, Hatcher present-

Ied a preliminary report of the'
athletic expansion committee. At
that meeting the Regents author-
ized the planning, design and con-
struction of a University Events
Building, costing about $3.5 million
and seating 12,000 to 15,000 spec-
tators. Both of these figures were
altered as the actual plans were
developed.
Kenneth Black and Associates{
of Lansing and Dan Dworsky of
Los Angeles, former Michigan foot-
ball All-American, were selected
architects of the project, which
was originally expected to be com-
pleted in time for the 1965-6,6
basketball season. That date has,
now been changed because of the
later starting date. Athletic Direc-
tor H. O. (Fritz) Crisler points out
that the building should take about
15 months to construct so it will
be ready in the last half of 1966.
Preliminary Plans
In June, the architects present-
ed preliminary plans to Crisler and
the Athletic Board. About a month
ago, the plains for the arena were
returned with cost estimates in
excess of $3.5 million.

UNITED NATIONS CELEBRATION
HOOTENANNY AND FOLKDANCING
Sponsored by the Baha'is, Sat., Oct. 24 at 8 P.M.
At FRIEND'S CENTER, 1420 Hill St.
Students of all Nations and Races are invited
"Unification of the whole of mankind is the hall-mark of the stage
which human society is now approaching. .. . The unity of the human
race, as envisaged by Baha'u'llah, implies the establishment of a world
commonwealth in which all nations, races, creeds, and classes are
closely and permanently united, and in which the autonomy of its state
members and the personal freedom and initiative of the individuals
that compose them are definitely and completely safeguarded."
Y

1511 Washtenaw Avenue
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Stephen J. Stein, Vicar
Sunday at 9:45 and 11:15: Sermon
Sunday at 11:15: Bible Class
Sunday at 6:00: Gamma Delta Supper
Wednesday at 8:30 p.m.: Discussion Group,
Wednesday at 10:00 p.m.: Midweek devotion,
ST. ANDREW'S CHURCH and
the EPISCOPAL STUDENT
FOUNDATION
306 North Division
Phone 662-4097
SUNDAY
8:00 a.m.-Holy Communion.
9:00 a.m.-Holy Communion and Sermon.
Breakfast at Canterbury House.
11:00 n.m.-Morning Prayer and Sermon.
7:00 p.m.-Evening Prover and commentary.
TUESDAY,
9:15 a.m.-Holy Communion.
WEDNESDAY
7:00 a.m.-Holy Communion.
FR IDAY
12:10 p.m.-Holy Communion.
ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
331 Thompson
NO 3-0557
SUNDAY-Masses at 7:00, 8:00, 9:30, 11:00,
12:00, 12:30.
MONDAY-SATURDAY-Mnees at 6:00 o.m.,
6:30, 7:00, 8:00, 9:00, 10:00, 11:00
and 12:00.
WEDNESDAY-7:30 p.m.-Mvther Perpetuol
Help Devotions. Confessions followinq.
SATURDAY-Confessions: 3:30-5:00; 7:30-
9:00 p.m.
ZION LUTHERAN CHURCH
1501 W. Liberty St.
Ralph B. Piper, David Bracklein,
Fred Holtfreter, Pastors
Worship Services-8:30 and 11:15 a.m.
Holy Communion - Second Sunday of each
month.
Church School & Adult Bible Class-9:45 a.m.
Holy Baptism-First Sunday of month.
Nursery facilities during worship services and
church school.

FIRST METHODIST CHURCH and
WESLEY FOUNDATION
At State and Huron Streets
Phone NO 2-4536
Hoover Rupert, Minister
Eugene Ransom, Campus Minister
Jean Robe Bissell, Associate Campus
Minister
SUNDAY
9:00 and 11:15 a.m.-Worship Services, Dr.
Rupert: "Faith Under Fire; Reasoning With
the Irrational Intellectualist."
10:15 a.m.-Student Seminar, Pine Room.
"Christian Faith and Politics: Election
Issues," Prof. William Gable, Dept. of Po-
litical Science.
7:00 p.m.-Worship and Program, Wesley
Lounge. Speakers from Young Republicans
and Young Democrats, discussion following.
TUESDAY
8:30 o.m.--Open House, Jean Bissell's apart-
ment:
WEDNESDAY
7:00 a.m.-Holv Communion, Wesley Lounqe,
followed by breakfast in Pine Room. Out
in time for 8:00 a.m. classes.
5:10 p.m.-Holy Communion, Wesley Lounge.
6:00 p.m. - Wesley Grads. Dinner in Pine
Room followed by going as a group to the
Newman Club where Paul Van Buren, Pro-
testant theologian, and John Harden, Order
of the Jesuits, will speak.
DISCIPLES OF CHRIST
MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
730 Tapnan-662-4245
Russell M. Fuller-Pastor

BETHLEHEM UNITED CHURCH
OF CHRIST
432 S. Fourth St.
Rev. E. R. Klaudt, Rev. A. C. Bizer,
& Rev. A. G. Habermehl, Pastors
9:30 and 10:45 a.m.-Worship Service
9:30 and 10:45 a.m.--Church School
7:30 p.m.--Student Guild

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave.
NO 2-4466
Ministers: Ernest T. Campbell, Malcolm
Brown, Virgil Janssen, John Waser
SUNDAY
Worship at 9:00, 10:30 a.m. and 12.
Presbyterian Campus Center located at
Church.

.,
,4
the
'1
'.
14
.4

For further information call 662-3548
Baha'i Student Group

CAMPUS CHAPEL
Forest at Washtenaw
The Rev. Donald Postema
Sponsored by the Christian Reformed Churches
of Michigan.
Services at 10 a.m. and 7 p.m.
Discussion at 8:15 in Fellowship Hall
BAPTIST CAMPUS CENTER
502 East Huron 663-9376
SUNDAY
9:45 a.m. Campus Discussion Class
11 :00 a.m. Worship - First Baptist Church
6:45 p.m. Lecture-Discussion
Paul W. Light - Campus Minister
James H. Middleton-Senior Minister

I

11

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Sunday Worship-10:45 a.m.
CAMPUS CENTER GUILD HOUSE
802 Monroe-662-5189
Y. E. Edwards-Campus Minister
7:00 p.m. Sunday - Seminar on
Christian Thought.

Historic

Im

CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
Corner State and William
Dr. Fred E. Lochs, Minister
Services at 9:30 and 11:15 a.m.-"The Mean-
ing of Religion," Rev. Neil H. Swanson.
Church School, crib-9th grade - 9:30 and
11:15 a.m.
Student Guild, 802 Monroe, telephone 2-5189.

FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw Ave.

R'

For transportation call 662-4018.
9:30 a.m.-Sunday School for pupils from 2
to 20 years of age.
11:00 a.m.-Sunday morning church service.
11:00 a.m.-Sunday School for pupils from 2
to 6 years of age.
A free reading room is maintained at 306 E.
Liberty, open doily excepttSundays and
holidays from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m:
Monday evenings from 7:00 to 9:00 p.m.

jvx9m. I geez

lJ/

l

LUTHERAN STUDENT CENTER
AND CHAPEL

THE CHURCH OF CHRIST

11

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11

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