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October 23, 1964 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1964-10-23

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PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 23, x:964

PAGE SIX THE MICHIGAN DAILY FRIDAY, OCTOBER 23, 1964

Late Russian Medal Surge Challenges Lead ofU.S. NEW CLUB:
M Cyclist
By The Associated Press Russian fencers knocked the pic equestrian individual dressage left. Seven Russians are in the Basketball The Americans made the finalsC
TOKYO-Russia's strong boxers United States out of the running contest. finals, and assured of at least sil- The United States' never-beaten with a 62-42 triumph over Puerto
and skilled gymnasts are expected for the men's sabre team cham- The Swiss beat Germany's Harry ver medals. basketball team faces its biggest Rico, but had to come from be-
to provide enough medals to sur pionship as the last full day of Boldt by a single point. Russia's Gymnastics-The United States' challenge in history tonight when hind a one-point deficit at ths
Sthe Olymplic Games got under way. Sergey Filatov, the defending shutout should continue. Russia it goe agis a manRsian half to do it.

s Stage
Sunday

I

a

while the major East-West con-
frontation takes place on the
basketball court as the Tokyo
Olympics reach their last full day
of competition.
The Russians, who added medals
with startling rapidity in gymnas-
tics and canoeing yesterday, are
virtually assured of moving ahead
of the U.S. total. But for the first
time since the 1952 Games at Hel-
sinki their gold medal total may
fall short of. America's.
U.S. forces collected two sur-
prise medals in women's canoeing
yesterday as Marcia Jones of
Oklahoma City placed third in the
kayak singles and the women's
kayak doubles team of Gloria Fer-
rier and Francine Fox of Washing-
ton, D.C., placed second.
-finest quality laundry-
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and $140
DRESSES
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A & P Cleaners
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Russia's 9-4 victory dropped the'
Americans into competition for
fifth and sixth places.
"The Russians were just too
strong for us," said Gene Hamori
of Ithaca, N.Y. "We needed a lucky
break, but we didn't get it."
Hamori won one of his three
fights. A. T. Morales of Tucson,
Ariz., broke even in his four
matches, Attila Keresztes of Los
Angeles won one- and lost one
while Bob Blum of New York
failed to win in three fights.
In an earlier match, Italy de-
feated Hungary 9-7 in a major up-
set. The Hungarians had won the
title in seven consecutive Olym-
piads and nine of 11 over-all.
Italy is the only other, country
ever to win a sabre team title.
Russia clinched the Olympic
men's volleyball gold medal with
a team of power players that
bl'asted Brazil 3-0.
The victory gave Russia an un-
surmountable lead ahead of Czec-
hoslovakia, which plays Korea latej
today in a final round game.
The Czechs appeared assured of
the silver medal and Japan of the
bronze.
Henri Chamartin, 46-year-old
non-commissioned officer in the
Swiss Army, won the first gold
medal for Switzerland when he
captured top honors in the Olym-

k
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champion, finished third for the M has 12 performers left in the five team in the finals of the Olympic Russia beat the same Puerto
bronze medal. finals. championship. Rico team 82-63 and made the'
That lifted America's over-all l The United States and Russia "We're well and waiting," was finals on the strength of a 53-47I
medal total to 88-34 gold, 26 sil- are meeting at the Olympics for the terse comment of U.S. Coach edge over Brazil, the 1963 world
ver and 28 bronze. Russia, how- the fourth time. And the Ameri- Henry Iba, who has directed the champions. The United States
ever, marshalled her forces in the cans have been able to win the team through eight straight vic beat Brazil 86-53 earlier.
sports considered minor to Ameri- medal battle only at Helsinki in tories in this 18th modern Olym- Iba said he would start with
cans, won 13 medals and lifted its 1952 when the U.S. team came pics. Princeton's Bill Bradley and Jerry
total to 77, includg 23 gold, 21 out ahead 76-69 and 40-22 in gold. The U.S. team generally has won Shipp of Bartlesville, Okla., at the
silver and 33 bronze. In 1956, at Melbourne, Russia handily, but is far from as over- Arwar s, Lucious Jackson of Pan
However, there are 20 finals on was in front 98-74 and 37-32 in whelming as the 1960 team that UCAWalt Haar an Aroa
today's program and Russian ath- gold. At Rome four years ago, the romped thugh tead thtA Watazzardand Arizonaj
letes have assured themselves of Soviets hit the high water mark of romped through the field with State University's Joe Caldwell in
at least 10 medals with an over- 103 while the American level drop- almost nonchalant ease. the backcourt.

all potential that can reach 22.
The United States, meanwhile, has
assured itself of only two more-
and has little potential beyond

ped to 71. In golds, it was Russia,
43-34.
The Tokyo Games have once
again reaffirmed America's super-

that. iority in track and field and swim-
Here's the way the events stack ming while lifting the U.S. medal
up at a glance: total to its high in the four East-
Boxing-Joe Frazier of Phila- West battles. The Russians, on the
delphia, who will meet Germany's other hand, have not been as
Hans Huber for the heavyweight strong as expected and likely will
gold medal, is the only U.S. entry fall below the 100-mark.

"We haven't been trying to run
up any big scores," Iba said. "We
just want everybody to play and
we want to try to play some de-
fense, too."
The Russians, however, also
have moved through eight games
without major difficulty and are
a match for the Americans in
height and strength.
Furthermore, a touring U.S.
AAU squad, many of whom are
on the Olympic team, lost about as'
many as it won on a tour of Russia
and the Iron Curtain countries a
month or so before the Olympics.
The United States has won five
straight Olympic titles in the
sport that originated in Massa-
chusetts and has won 46 straight
since basketball was introduced to
the Olympics in 1936.

Among the Russian starters are
the veteran Gennadi Volnov, 6-
foot-8, who has played in three
Olympics and is now listed as an
assistant coach, and the 6-11 cen-
ter, Alex Petrov. Jan Kruminsh,
7-foot-2 veteran who has started
at center in the last two Olympics,
is in reserve.
The match will be the fourth
straight between the two countries
for the Olympic title.
OLYMPIC MEDAL
DISTRIBUTION
Nation Gold Silver Bronze
United States 34 26 28
Russia 23 21 33
Japan 12 3 7
Germany 9 18 16
Hungary 8 7 4
Italy 8 9 5
Australia 6 2 8
Britain 4 12 1
Poland 4 5 8
Czechoslovakia 4 4 3

S
t
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1
t
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i

By BOB McFARLAND
A recently-formed cyclist club
composed of three University stu-
dents will enter into competition'
for the first time this Sunday at
Windsor, Ontario.
The group will participate in the
championship races of the Wolver-
ine Sports Club of Detroit. The
events Sunday are sprints varying
in length from one-half to 10j
miles. The contests are held on a!
one-quarter mile banked track.
Members of the club include
Mike Kolin, Dan Ruuska and
Richard Fitts. Although they are
operating as unofficial representa-
tives of the University this year,
they hope to gain official sanc-
tion next year.
Kolin pointed out that almost'
all colleges in the East recognize
cycling as a varsity sport, and a
national college championship is
held each year. Kolin, Ruuska and
Fitts have done very well in com-
petition against the nation's top
collegiate riders. Kolin asked,

GRID SELECTIONS

"Why should such schools as
Princeton and Yale be allowed to
consistently walk away with the
top honors when it is possible that
we have better cyclists right here
at Michigan?"
The three are all experienced
riders. Kolin, an 18-year-old
freshman from Detroit, won the
1963 state championship of Micli-
igan in the senior division and the
1962 state championship in the
junior class, He was ranked six-
teenth in the entire nation in 1963
as a road cyclist.
Junior Fitts has regularly placed
high in meets in the Chicago area.
Ruuska -earned a sprint prize in a
Dayton, Ohio, race three weeks
ago.
The club has planned an exten-
sive training program. They are
going to organize touring rides
for all interested students next
spring. Speed skating will serve
to keep the group in condition dur-
ing the winter. When weather per-
mits, each attempts to ride his
bicycle three hours a day.
The members are affiliated with
the Wolverine Sports Club, to
which three former Olympic cycl-
ists belong. The sports club pro-
vides coaching forsthe Michigan
students.
Two bicycles are usually neces-
sary for competition. One type,
the standard 10-speed racing bike,
is used for road events which
range from 33 to 100 miles in
length. A special bicyclenis used
in track contests, however. The
bike is not equipped with brakes
and has only one speed. A direct
chain drive is employed on the all-
aluminum track cycle. It is neces-
sary to use special tires with 120-
pound pressure.
Anyone desiring more informa-
tion about the cyclist club, or stu-
dents interested in entering into
competition with them are urged
to call Mike Kolin at 764-3712.

,

4

} H. Neil "Buddy" Berkson is the Grid Picks Guest Selector this
week. Berkson, a member of the United States' Greco-Roman wrestling
team in 1960 and currently goalie of the North American water polo
squad, stomped over to the sports department last night and man-
handled the editor until the latter had no choice but to approve him
as guest selector.
In any event, the weekly winner receives two tickets to the Mich-
igan Theatre currently showing "Kisses For My President" and is
granted eligibility for the grand prize at the end of the season. Entries
can be picked up at The Daily, 420 Maynard St. The weekly deadline
is midnight Friday.E
THIS WEEK'S GAMES
Consensus (64-35 .646) in capital letters

A Symposium: The Fundamentals of
L THE*********

CONSERVATIVE El

El

**LIBERAL *****I

1. Minnesota at MICHIGAN
2. ULCA at ILLINOIS
3. PURDUE at Iowa
4. Northwestern at MICH. STATE
5. Wisconsin at OHIO STATE
6. DUKE at Army

11. Houston at MISS. STATE
12. WASH. STATE at Idaho
13. PITTSBURGH vs. Navy
14. So. Carolina at NO. CAROLINA
15. Stanford at NOTRE DAME
16. Florida at ALABAMA

Bulgaria
New Zealand
Finland
Rumania
Turkey
Sweden
Denmark
Yugoslavia
Belgium
Netherlands
Canada
Ethiopia
Bahamas
France
Switzerland
Trinidad
Korea
Tunisia
Cuba
Argentina
Iran
Ghana
Ireland

3
3
3
2
2
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
4
0
0
0
0
0
0
Q
0
0

SPEAKER

CONFLICT
S: DR. JOHN CLARK, U of M. Professor
DR. LESTER DE KOSTER,
Librarian Calvin College
CAMPUS CHAPEL, Washtenw & Forest

5 2
0 2
0 1
4 6
3 x
2 4
x 3
1 1
0 1
4 4
2 1
0 0
0 0
6 6
2 1
1 2
1 1
1 1
1 0
1 0
0 2
o 1
0 1
MIeet

Wenley House
Beats Taylor
In IM Softball
Thirty-five degrees, a frozen
field, and a dark night.
Hardly the ingredients for al
residence hall championship base-
ball game but they played it any-
way, at Wines Field last night,
and Wenley House defeated Tay-
lor by a score of 11-6. For Wen-
ley, it was the fourth champion-
ship in six intramural events this
fall.
Wenley scored all their runs on
clusters in the first, second, and
fourth innings of the game. Two
of the three runs in the opening
frame came on a home run by
Captain Charley Care. Wenley
pitcher Tom Huguelet was out-
standing as he hurled a one-
hitter and struck out eight bat-
ters.
Taylor trailed 11-3 as the sixth
and final inning began, but took
advantage of errors to close the
gap before Huguelet fanned the
final two hitters for Wenley's sec-

4

PLACE:

TIME: Sunday, Oct. 25, 1964 at 8:30 P.M.
CAM P S CH PEL.Reformed Churches in Michigan.
CAIs Sponsored by the Christian
Rev. Donald Postema, Pastor
WORSHIP SERVICES at 10:00 A.M. and 7:00 P.M.

7. Califqrnia at SOUTHERN CAL. 17. NO. CAROLINA ST. at Virginia
8. Tennessee at LSU 18. DARTMOUTH at Harvard<
9. Kansas- State at OKLAHOMA 19. Clemson at TCU
10. MIAMI (O) at Ohio U. 20. OREGON at Washington?
SPORTS STAFF SELECTIONS
MARTIN BARRETT (Last Week's Winner)-Michigan, Illinois, lowa, Mich-
igan State, Ohio State, Duke, Southern Cal, LSU, Oklahoma, Miami (O), Hous-
ton, Idaho, Pittsburgh, North Carolina, Notre Dame. Florida, North Carolina
State, Dartmouth, TCU, Washington.
CHARLIE TOWLE (Contributing Sports Editor, 64-35-.646)-Michigan, Illi.. MARCIA JONES
nois, Purdue, Michigan State, Ohio State, Duke, Southern Cal, LSU, Oklahoma, --
Miami (O), Mississippi State, Idaho, Pittsburgh, North Carolina, Notre Dame,
Florida, North Carolina State, Harvard, TCU, Washington.. *
BILL BULLARD (Sports Editor 63-36-.636)-Michigan, Illinois, Iowa, Mich- g
igan State, Ohio State, Duke, Southern Cal, LSU, Oklahoma, Miami (O), Mis-
sissippi State, Washington State, Pittsburgh, North Carolina, Notre Dame, Ala-'
bama, North Carolina State, Dartmouth, Clemson, Oregon. "l
GARY WYNER (Associate Sports Editor, 62-37-.626) - Michigan, Illinois,I
Purdue, Northwestern, Ohio State, Duke, Southern Cal, LSU, Oklahoma, Miami I J ll lJIi
(O), Mississippi State, Washington State, Navy, North Carolina, Notre Dame,
Alabama, North Carolina State, Harvard, Clemson, Oregon.
TOM ROWLAND (Associate Sports Editor, 57-42-.576)-Michigan, Illinois, By RICH GOODMAN

I

Pro Standings

I

Toronto
Montreal
Chicago
New York
Detroit
Boston

NHL
W L T
2 0 2
1 2 2
0 4 1

Pts. GF GA
6 17 11
6 13 S
5 14 10
4 11 11
4 10 11
1 7 21

1

A

Team ToI

YETERDAY'S RESULT
Toronto 2, Boston 2
NBA
EASTERN DIVISION

and consecutive "A"'
championship.

softball

r Water Polo
ftr aining sport for the team.

mawumemors

Purdue, Michigan State, Ohio State, Duke, California, LSU, Oklahoma, Miami
(O), Mississippi State, Washington State, Navy, Nprth Carolina, Notre Dame,
Alabama, North Carolina State, Dartmouth, TCU, Oregon.
H. NEIL BERKSON (Guest Selector)-Minnesota, Illinois, Purdue, Michigan
State, Ohio State, Duke, Southern Cal, LSU, Oklahoma, Miami (O), Houston,
Washington State-Idaho (tie), Pittsburgh, North Carolina, Notre Dame, Florida,
Virginia, Dartmouth, TCU, Oregon.

p

_. ..._,

I

s

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. I

Coach Gus Stager's varsity Michigan has three water polo
Sclubs. One is made up of varsity
swimming team will play its first swimmers, one contains freshmen
water polo game tomorrow against s
the Hamilton Water Polo Club. swimmers, and the third club con-
sists of alumni swimmers. All
The Hamilton team, from Ham- teams that play are on a club
ilton, Ontario, has several players basis, with the visiting club paying
who were formerly on the Cana- its own expenses. Sunday morning
dian Pan American water polo the Hamilton club will again play
team, and a few men who were !the varsity swimmers, and, if pos-
on the last Canadian Olympic sible, they will play a second game
team. The player-coach of the against the alumni. The freshmen
club is Mike McLaughin, a former teams hosts Flint Junior College
University student. next Thursday at 4:30 p.m.
Last year the Hamilton team
beat Michigan three times by The game tomorrow will be held
scores of 11-3, 10-6 and 7-5. This at the varsity pool in the Sports
year Coach Stager is "looking for Building immediately following
revenge," but added with a smile the Michigan-Minnesota football
that the swimming team plays clash. There will be no admission
water polo because "it's a lot of fee and all persons interested are
fun, and it has been a very good invited to attend.
SEE EUROPE FOR LESS
... ALL STUDENT TRIPS
Travel in a small group with other students of your some
age and interests. All-expense low cost trips by ship or
plane:
ADVENTURER: 47 days-10 countries-$1029.50
BUCCANEER: 62 days-10 countries
(inc. Greece) $1284
THRIFTRIP: 69 days-14 countries
(inc. Scandinavia) $1398
VAGABOND: 64 days-14 countries
(inc. Russia) $1198
Write for FREE itineraries and details:
AMERICAN YOUTH ABROAD,
44 University Station, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55414

Haunt Your Friends
with a Halloween Card

SWEAT SHIRTS
for the Entire Fa mily

COURT ORDER:
Block Braves
.From Moving
NEW YORK (A) - The Mil-
waukee Braves' plans to move to
Atlanta in 1965 were blocked yes-
terday by legal complications but
the club filed a notice of intention
with Commissioner Ford Frick toF
draft the Atlanta territory from
the International League.
Due to a restraining order,s
issued Wednesday in Milwaukee
by Circuit Judge Ronald Drech-
sler, the Braves made no request
to move at a special National
League meeting.
However, William Bartholomay,
chairman of the club's board of
directors, said "counsel for the
Braves has been instructed to pro-
ceed immediately to have the re-
straining order lifted."
The order, answerable Tuesday,
keeps the club from moving or re-
questing a move. At a hearing
Tuesday it will be decided whether
an injunction shall be granted
against the proposed move because
of alleged contractural obligations
by the Braves through Dec. 31,
1965 at County Stadium. .
The delay was a setback to
Atlanta's hopes of having a major
league club next season. A 52,000-
seat stadium costing $18 million
is being rushed to completion for
the Braves in downtown Atlanta.
Warren Giles, president of the
National League, has been given
authority to call a special meeting
on short notice, less than the nor-
mal 10 days, any time the Mil-
waukee club officials are legally
free to request a transfer.
rts

Boston
Cincinnati
Philadelphia
New York
WESTERN]
St. Louis
Los Angeles
Baltimore
Detroit
San Francisco

W L Pct.
2 0 1.000
2 1 .666
1 1 .500
0 1 .000
DIVISION
1 0 1000
2 1 .666
2 1 .666
1 3 .250
0 3 .000

GB
1
11
2

FROM

I

I

HAROLD S. TRICK

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Boston 104, Detroit 102
Baltimore 138, Philadelphia 135 (ovt)
FROM THE.
NOR THSIDE
PRESS
What is freedom?
If Socrates were to ask
Thrasymachus Smith t h i s
question in 1964, T S would
probably answer, "Freedom
is being able to do what you
want to do." Then he might
add, ". . as long as you
don't hurt anyone."
Typical contemporary sen-
timent. Since I am looking
for something to editorialize
about, I think I will inter-
rupt this gripping Platonic
dialogue here to point out
that this answer suggests (to
me, at any rate) two direc-
tions for free actions. One
direction is negative: some
governing agency must make
laws to keep the people who
are doing what they want
to do from hurting the peo-
ple who are just standing
around not doing anything.
On the positive side, people
could try to find out what
activities are suited to the
nature of responsible crea-
tures, who might want to do
the kinds of things that af-
firm the individual worth
and dignity of everyone.
We need laws to keep in
check 'those who do not see
the positive side of freedom
(and for most of those who
do, too), but we decide on
p o s it i v e concerted action
only after we have carefully
determined t h e problems
confronting us, and discussed
alternative solutions in com-
nanv with others who are

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902 S. STATE

F.

11

Im

weater impo:

O U R DISTINCTIVE
SWEATER collection
features the classic look
from England. McGeorge and
Cox Moore fine lamb's wool and
Scottish shetlands in new heather
tones. Hand framed and fully
fashioned.

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U U I:.ii I-,at C {< '

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