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August 25, 1964 - Image 44

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1964-08-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

-I

PAGE FOUR

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY. ATTV.TTIqT 2.9. 1+9ltd

PAGE ram HEMCHGN ALYTTFnA RT±TQ .

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1.

MSU LAST WINNER:
M'l Wins Fourth Straight Crown

Wrestlers Seek To Repeat

Impressive Record
BIG TEN ALL-SPORTS STANDINGS
(Fall, Winter, Spring, 1963-64)

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(Continued from Page 1)
a second place finish in swimming
and a fifth place finish in football.
Michigan competed in eleven of
the thirteen recognized Big Ten
sports the only two they did not
compete in were fencing and cross
country. The only school which
competed in all thirteen sports
was Michigan State.
The Spartans were the last
team to take away the mythical
trophy from Michigan turning the
trick back in 1959-60.
The order of finish in the Big
Ten, going by the quality points
system, was Michigan and Michi-
gan State followed in order by
Wisconsin, Minnesota, Indiana,
Ohio State, Illinois, Purdue, North-
western and finally Iowa.

By TOM ROWLAND
Special To The Daily
MADISON - Two Big Ten
champs and 56 points swept Mich-
igan to its second straight con-
ference wrestling championship
last spring.
The outcome was never in doubt
as a corrected scoring error
snowed the Wolverines leading
ing nearest competitor Iowa by 14
points at the beginning of the fi-
nal matches. The Hawkeyes then
pushed the total to 42 on a pair
of individual titlists and two more
consolation winners. Indiana fol-
lowed with 35 points; Northwest-j
ern had 32.
The Wolverines crowned Ralph'
Bahna and Lee Deitrick in the
coveted circle of individual med-

alists while Bob Spaly took a
second place title and Chris Sto-
well and sophomore Bill Johan-
nesen won thirds.
Bahna, in his Big Ten finale for
the Wolverines, powered his way,
to a 9-0 win over Purdue's Ralph
Trail and the 123-pound cham-
pionship. Trail, a 15-4-1 power-
house who dropped down from 130
for the meet, never got a start
against the Wolverines' senior-
Bahna pulled a takedown in the
first period and was in control
all the way. After a slow second
stanza the new champ piled up
a pair of predicament points and
then coasted to the victory.
With the title Bahna, who com-
piled a 6-4 record for the dual
meet season, became Michcigan's

X-Did Not CompeteI
**Quality points are obtained by dividing the number of points accumulated on
the basis of 10 for a first, 9 for a second, etc., by the number of sports in which
each school entered a team.
Key to abbreviations of sports: FB-football; CC-cross country; TR-I--indoor
track; FEN-fencing; GYM--gymnastics; SW-swimming; WR-wrestling;
HOC-hockey; B-basketball; TR-U-outdoor track; GO-golft; TEN-
tennis; BASE-baseball.

COMPETITION IN OVER 30 SPORTS:
I-M ProgramOffers Varied Activities

By PERRY HOOD
The Michigan student and af-
filiate has at his disposal the fa-
tilities of one of the nation's larg-
est and most elaborate intramural
sports departments.
The Michigan I-M program is
divided into 12 divisions, with
competition in over 30 sports. Di-
rector Earl Riskey and Associate
sh Lagest Stock in MichiganDirector Rod Grambeau head the
large department, while many of
- i

the officials are recruited from the
student body at a modest salary.
The center of activities for the
program is the Intramural Sports
Building, located on Hoover just
sports are played either at South
west or South State. Outdoor
Ferry Field or at Wines Field. In
addition, a few activities are held
in the Union.
The 12 divisions allow participa-
tion for every male on campus.
These divisions are as follows:
1) All Campus: The majority of
sports in this division are indi-
vidual participation activities,
which are open to any male stu-
dent. These tournaments will in-
cludwe cross country, twenty-one,
handball singles and doubles,
squash, paddleball singles and
daubles table tennis, bowling, div-
ing, codeball. boxing, fencing.
gymnastics, weight lifting, foul
throwing, archery, tennis, bad-
minton, horseshoes, rifle shooting,
golf and lifesaving.
Also included in this division is
team competition in softball, la-
crosse and ice hockey.
(2) Clubs: The I-M Department
sponsors a club program, through
which any group of students inter-
ested in a particular sport or ath-
letic activity may form a club.
Clubs generally obtain a faculty
advisor and then set up their own
program and competition. Infor-
mation about this procedure may
be obtained at the I-M office.
3) Co-Recreation: The only part
of the I-M program in which there
is coed participation is the co-
recreation program held every Fri-
Iday night at the Sports Building.
at This time there are swimming,
basketball, volleyball, paddleball,
badminto, and trampoline facili-
ties available for both male and
female participants.
4) Faculty: There is a 15-sport
program for faculty members set
up under the Intramural Depart-
ment. Points and trophies for in-
dividual and all-year champions
are awarded in this competition.
Especially fierce is the faculty
water polo competition, the games
beiing played during the lunch
hour.
5) Fraternity: The social fra-
ternity program, which involves 44
fraternities in a 23-sport program,
is the largest division of the I-M
played in this division include
program. The sports that are
played in this divison include
touch football, track, cross coun-
try, volleyball, handball, swim-
ming, bowling, wrestling, basket-
ball, paddleball, water polo table
tennis, relays, foul throwing, soft-
ball, horseshoes, tennis and golf.
Champuions are crowned in each
sport, and total points are kept
Welcome Students!
Good Haircuts!
come from
U-M BARBERS
near Kresge's

during the year so that one house
is the all-around winner at the
end of each year.
6) Professional Fraternity: In
this division, there are 20 fraterni-
ties, competing in 12 sports. The
sports are touch football, volley-
ball, handball, bowing, basketball,
table tennis, swimming, softball,
horseshoes, tennis and golf. Here
again champions are crowned by
sport and for the year.
7) Independents: This competi-
tion is for stulents who are not
affiliated with any of the other
divisions, such as fraternities or
residence halls. The independent
schedule includes 15 sports: touch
football, volleyball, paddleball,
bowling, handball, basketball, ta-
ble tennis, relays, swimming, foul
throwing, softball, rifle shooting,
horseshoes, tennis and golf.
In this division there are indi-
vidual and yearly champions. Stu-
dents who desire to compete in
team sports and do not have an
affiliation in any other division
are encouraged to form teams and
enter the independent competi-
tion. A team can enter in all the
sports or any individual sports it
wishes. An individual who wants
to compete but is not able to form
a team is invited to report to the
I-M office where the directors will
attempt to place him on a team.
8) International Center: The
competition sponsored jointly by
the International Center and the
I-M Department is carried on be-
tween students from various for-
eign countries. It is a nine-sport
program including soccer, volley-
ball, table tennis, basketball, bad-
minton, swimming, softball, tennis
and cricket. Individual sport and
all-year champions are crowned.
Students representing any coun-
try are urged to form a team and
enter competition in any or all of
the sports. If there are not enough
from any one country, the students
are urged to join others to form a
team.
9) Instruction: Instruction in
almost any sport is available
through the I-M Department. Out-
standing athletes in many sports
volunteer their services to act as
instructors for interested students.
Special hours and facilities at the
Sports Building are set aside for
this instruction. Students desiring
such help should inquire at the
I-M office.
10) North Campus: Since 1956
there has been a separate I-M
this program as the need arises.
program for North Campus resi-
dents. New sports are added to
11) Residence Halls: Like the
fraternity division, the residence
halls compete in a 23-sport pro-
gram. There are 22 houses that
take part. The sports are the same
as those in the fraternity division,
and champions are crowned in
each sport, as well as a single
over-all champion.
The I-M Department will an-
nounce each of the activities which
it conducts as the year goes by.
The schedule for all activities will
be posted in the Sports Building
on the bulletin boards in
The I-M Department also prints
a yearly bulletin which includes
all schedules, all rules, and a de-
scription of each of the divisions

winningest wrestler of the tourney
with a pin among three victories
on his way to the final bracket.
Lee Deitrick followed in the
Michigan point parade with a sol-
id 7-2 win over Northwestern's
Ron Wisner for the 147-pound
medal. The Wolverine junior
grabbed a takedown midway
through the first period and after
Risner escaped quickly countered
with another. Deitrick escaped at
the opening of the second period,
adding another takedown, and
was well on his way to the title
before Risner finally got a second
escape point near the end of the
match.
Steps Up a Notch
Deitrick, who was runner-up in
tle 147-pound class in last year's
tournament, put the final touches
countering the escape with a tak
countering the escape with a take-
down and rode Risner out for the
title
A second period's worth of riding
time slipped Wisconsin's Roger
Pillath past Wolverine Bob Spaly
in the heavyweight finals, 2-1.
Spaly, down at the beginning of
the period, couldn't shake loose
for the escape point until :10 was
left; then in the third three min-
utes Pillath broke loose quickly
from Spaly's grasp.
Takedown Does It
Wolverine Bill Johannesen nab-
bed Ohio State's Gary Joseph
with a two point takedown in the
final three seconds to gain a third
place finish in the 130-pound
class, 4-2. And Chris Stowell's es-
cape and takedown in the open-
ing of the third period in the
nals of the 160-pound consola-
tions brought Michigan four more
team points; the Wolverine junior
beat Elmer Beale of Wisconsin
6-4.
Wolverine 137-pounder Cal Jen-
kins went two overtime periodss
with Iowa's Bill Fuller before los-
ing on a referee's decision. It was
the third close decision loss that1
the Wolverines were dealth during;
the tourney; the defeat gave Jen-
kins a fourth place.
Easy Win
Iowa's Norm Parked breezed his
way to the 130-pound crown on
an easy 10-0 decision over Bobk
Campbell of Indiana. Parker was
the 1962 titlist in the 123-poundr
class and was runner-up at 130
last year.
Traekment
'Compete
Out Westt
In other action following the
Big Ten season several members
of the Michigan track team travel-
ed to the West Coast to partici-
pate in the U.S. Track and Field
Federation championships at Cor-
vallis, Ore., and the National
Collegiaterchampionships at Eu-
gene, Ore.
At Corvallis Michigan ran into
tough luck in both the mile relay
and the 3,000 meters. The Wol-
verines got a bad start in the re-t
lay and even Bernard couldn't
make up the distance as they fin-
ished fourth in 3:12.1. Murray1
was fourth in the 3000.
Soudek beat out Henderson
again and came in with a fourth
place in the discus with a heave of
176'1". This was a full six feet
further than Henderson's best toss
of the day. In the 110-meter high1
hurdles Nuttall finished out of the
money in sixth.
At Eugene the mile relay team
again came through with a great
performance as placed third with
a 3:09.2. In the 400-meter dash
Bernard was in a photo finish for
first but was awarded third place
as the two front runners tied. All

three runners were timed in ident-
ical :45.9 clockings.
In action coning up Soudek
has already been selected to com-
pete in the Olympics for his native
Austria while Bernard seems to
be a sure bet to go to Tokyo as
a member of the Trinadad Olym-
pic team.

Rluch 64o
BY GARY WINER
'With Timberlake Quarterback
Grid Hopes Will Take Flack
No one has to sit down and spell out for any football coach the
value of a good passing offense.
Even Ohio State's unimaginative gridiron mentor Woody Hayes,
who likes to run his fullbacks close to 50 per cent of the time, last
year broke down and admitted that passing made a game more
open and allowed a team to form a more explosive type offense.
Michigan had its hands filled last year with good quarterbacks-
Danny Thomas of Southern Methodist, Roger Staubach of Navy, and
Ron DiGravio of Purdue. Those Navy and Purdue games were lost
through the air lanes to say nothing of tha fact that Michigan State
salvaged a 7-7 tie with the Wolverines by virtue of a short pass
to Sherman Lewis in the end zone.
In the past two seasons, Michigan's Bump Elliott has failed
to come up with an explosive ground or air. game, and there are
still a lot of question marks as to whether or not he'll be able to
correct at least part of this problem by the time the Air Force
Academy rolls into Ann Arbor on September 26.
As pro-type ball creeps more and more into the collegiate style
of play, the passing game is certainly attaining the recognition which
the long ball has had for many years in baseball.
Bomb is Phhtt!
The "bomb," as fans like to refer to the long touchdown pass,
has noticeably been lacking from the Michigan offense for some
time. Either the quarterbacks have been weak or the ends have
been, mediocre, but Elliott thinks there are some early signs of
optimism for both these positions this season.
He admits, "The quarterback situation is pretty healthy now.
Bob Timberlake and Frosty Evashevski will be back, and sophomores
Rick Vidmer, Rick Volk and Wally Gabler are looking good."
Veteran Timberlake nursed a shoulder injury through the
opening four games last year before regaining pre-season form
and taking charge of the team. But Timberlake has never been
a sensational passer and there is no reason to believe that
he'll give the Wolverines their much needed explosive passing
game this year. After two seasons, it is quite evident that
Timberlake lacks the ability to throw the long pass which
defenses fear. His specialty rather has been the short passes.
Evashevski has been a so-so signal caller. His experience will
certainly bolster the position, but don't bet on him starting opening
day, because his talents just aren't that outstanding.
If spring practice is any indication of talent, then Elliott should,
but probably won't, overlook Big Bob and his two years' experience
and decide to shoot the works with Vidmer.
Timberlake looked lik anything but a starting quarterback
during the spring scrimmages and the concluding intra-squad game.
Timberlake's credentials for the past two years have hinged on
his ability to run the option play from the wing-T offense. He
became quite adept at this by the end of last season, and it's no
secret that the key to the wing-T is a quarterback who can
rollout and know when to pass, run, or pitch back.
One Track Mind..*
The biggest problem though is that Timberlake seems to ignore
the pitch and only knows when it's best to pass or run, mostly the
latter. Elliott commented, "Up to this time, Timberlake has been
the only quarterback that could handle our type of offense with
precision, but now Vidmer is looking pretty good also."
During the spring, Vidmer demonstrated that he can handle the
pitch back better than Timberlake, and run and pass well with
consistency.
One of Elliott's faults has been his ability on occasion to over-
look potential talent and go with the sentimental favorite. It is this
one trait which will most likely allow Timberlake to be the starting
quarterback this fall.
On the other. end of the passing game, Michigan has had a
tradition of good receivers, but beyond this year's first team, the
Wolverines are hurting.
Craig Kirby and John Henderson were the offensive ends
last season, with Henderson scoring five touchdowns and snagging
27 aerials while Kirby accounted for 13 receptions. Elliott lists
both as the probable starting offensive receivers again, but the
back up ends are Captain Jim Conley and Bill Laskey, both de-
fensive specialists, and Steve Smith and Ben Farabee, mediocre
receivers.
If either Henderson or Kirby isn't available, the passing game
will be seriously threatened unless Elliott can find some talented
sophomores, who as of yet have failed to shine through.
Michigan completed a healthy 49 per cent of its pass attempts
last season, with seven going for touchdowns, but the lack of an
outstanding quarterback who could threaten a long pass may have
cost the Wolverines some ball games.
Chances are slim that Elliott is going to be able to come up
with both a very good running and a very good passing game this
year, either of which would be an improvement over last season.
But it is time he started pulling out the stops and began gambling
with some new faces or a wholenew offense.

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