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October 16, 1964 - Image 6

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The Michigan Daily, 1964-10-16

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PAGE SIX-

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 16, 1964

Sygar Shines in Double Role

YANK ATHLETES QUALIFY:

Robie Breaks Olympic Mark

~Cards Win World Series
By Defeating Yanks, 7-5

u

By JIM TINDALL
"Last spring we could only hope
that Rick Sygar would be able
to play this season. We couldn't
say for sure, and his condition
was doubtful. His rehabilitation
had to be quite rapid, and we
were just not sure," said head
football coach Bump Elliott yes-
terday.
Sygar has, through what Elliott
called "his own personal drive
and determination," returned to
the first string defensive unit
this season after twice breaking
the same leg.
The 185 pound halfback has
made his presence felt on both;
offense and defense in the past
two games, coming up with several
key plays.
Causes Fumbles
In the Navy game it was Sygar
who caused Navy end Nell Hen-
derson to fumble on the Michigan
six yard line when the Middies
were driving for the tying score.
At East Lansing last weekend,
Sygar, according to Elliott, "did
a good job. He came through on
defense, and, of course, threw the
key pass that won the ball game."
Also on offense, Sygar caught two
key passes and skirted the end to
the State nine yard line setting
up the first seven point score
which he tallied himself on a
five yard pass from quarterback

Bob Timberlake. Later in the
fourth quarter, he threw a 31
yard pass that John Henderson
caught on the five yard line and
carried into the end zone for the
touchdown that gave the Wolver-
ines a 17-10 victory over State.
Full Strength
With Sygar running at one hun-
dred per cent capacity this sea-
son, many Michigan fans have
forgotten that Sygar was only a
"hope" for the current season.
Sygar, who hails from Niles, Ohio,
worked out on his own at home
this summer strengthening his leg
so that he would be in shape for
the season.
The first break in his lcg oc-
curred just before the season open-
ed last year, and put the half-
back on crutches for most of the
winter. Then, in a freak accident,
he fell on an icy sidewalk and
broke the same leg again. Sygar
missed all of spring practice and
was listed as fourth on the right
halfback depth charts when the
season opened. For the first few
practices Sygar played with his

leg firmly taped, trying to over-
come a limp.
Today he is listed as number
one defensive halfback, and Elliott
explained that "we willuse Sygar
on both offense and defense this
year. He will be primarily a de-
fensive halfback, but he will seed
offensive action replacing injured'
players or if his playing warrants
it.
The play that won last week's
game for the Wolverines was one
suggested by coach Mason who,
like Sygar, comes from Niles, Ohio:
Since it is thrown by Sygar the.
play has been nicknamed the
"Niles Special." In addition to
Sygar, both halfback Dick Rind-
fuss and tackle Charley Kines, hail
from Niles, Ohio, and both of them
were blocking for Sygar when he
threw his passtorHenderson late
in the fourth quarter.
Elliott summed up Sygar's play
for the season when he said, "On,
defense, as a receiver, and as a
runner, Sygar has come through

By The Associated Press

this season, and we hope
will continue to do so."

that he

GRI SLECTIONS
Ed Bartsch, captain of this year's swimming team, is' The Daily's
guest selector this week. To enter the contest, Just mail or bring your
selections to The Daily at 420 Maynard St. by midnight tonight. Only
one entry per person is legal. Entry forms are available at The Daily,
but reasonable facsi'miles will be accepted. The winner will receive two
free passes to the Michigan Theatre, currently showing "Topkapi."
THIS WEEK'S GAMES'
(Consensus in capital letters)

TOKYO-Carl Robie of Drex-
el Hill, Pa., gave a strong indi-
cation that the United States
would continue its domination
of swimming, in which it already
has won nine gold medals.
Robie set an Olympic record of
2:10 in his heat of the men's 200
meter butterfly. The old mark of
2:12.8 was held by Mike Troy
of the United States.
Webster, defending champion in
high diving, dropped back to fifth
place after the second dive on
which he earned only 13.30 points
for a back dive with pike. That
gave him a total of 25.46 points.
Igor Lobanov of Russia led with
26.79.
Don Schollander, the 18-year-
old wonder from Lake Oswego,
Ore., captured his third gold med-
al of the games when he won the
400-meter freestyle in the world
record time of 4:12.2.
Schollander, a blond youngster
with a dimpled smile, has emerg-
ed as the outstanding individual
of the Games. With three records
already in hand-the 100, 400 and
relay freestyle, all in world rec-
ord time-he can win a fourth in
the men's 800-meter freestyle re-
lay Sunday.
There was a chance for five but
he was pulled from the men's 400-
meter medley relay and his place
given to teammate Steve Clark.
A teenage Australian, Ian O'-
Brien, broke the Yankee win-
ning streak when he won the 200-
meter breaststroke in 2:27.8, also
a world record. Chet Jastremski
of Toledo, Ohio, the previous rec-
ord holder, swam a disappointing
third and announced his retire-
ment from swimming.
Nevertheless, the United States
.swimmers and divers-most of
them kids in their teens-ran their
cache of Olympic medals to 21,
one more than the entire total in
the Rome Games in 1960. Nine
more finals are to come.
A 17-year-old high school girt

from Princeton, N.J., Lesley Bush,
pulled off the biggest surprise
when she upset the world cham-
pion, Ingrid Kramer-Engle, a tri-
ple gold medalist, in the women's
platform diving event.
The U.S. women's 400-meter
freestyle team streaked to an-
other world mark in taking the
gold in 4:03.8.
Members of the record-setting
women's relay team were Sharon
Stouder, 15, of Glendora, Calif.;
Donna de Varona, 17, of Santa
Clara, Calif.; Pokey Watson, 14, of
Portola Valley, Calif.,. and Kathy
Ellis, 17, of Indianapolis.
In the semifinals of the wom-
en's 100-meter butterfly, Miss
Stouder set an Olympic record
of 1:05.6. Miss Ellis, 1:07.2, and
Miss de Varona, 1:07.7, also quali-
fied.
World record holder Henry
Carr and two teammates raced in-
to the second round of the 200
meter dash Friday as the United
States pressed its quest for a
mushrooming number of medals
in the Olympic Games.
The Americans, making an un-
expectedly all around showing, al-
ready had 34 medals in their bun-
dle-15 gold, nine silver and 10
bronze. Russia, looking somewhat
weaker than expected, had seven
gold, six silver and nine bronge
for a total of 22.
Carr, from Detroit, ran eased up
and was just nosed out for first
place in his heat of the 200 me-
ters by Heinz Schumann of Ger-
many. Each was timed in 21 sec-
onds flat, well off Carr's world
record 20.2.
Paul Drayton, 25, of Cleveland
made the best showing of the
three Americans, winning the first
heat in 20.7. Dick Stebbins, 19,
of ° Los Angeles, finished second
in the eighth and final heat,
running behind defending cham-
pion Livio Berruti of Italy.
The unbeaten U.S. basketball
team sought its fifth straight vic-
tory in a battle with Yugoslavia.;

The Americans haven't lost in 42
Olympic contests since the sport
was added to the program in 1936.
America's Wyomia Tyus at-
tempted last night to become the
female counterpart of Bob Hayes,
the Jacksonville, Fla., flash who
proved he was the world's fast-
est human by winning the 100-
meter dash yesterday.
Miss Tyus, a leggy lass from
Griffin, Ga., entered the finals
Wednesday when she won her
100-meter heat in a world ree-
ord equalling 11.2 seconds. Then
Hayes, who had run a wind-aided
9.9 seconds in the semifinals, cap-
tured the men's 100-meter crown
and also matched the world rec-
ord with a 10-flat clocking.
At the same time Oerter, of
West Babylon, N.Y., set an Olym-
pic record with a heave of 200
feet, 1% inches despite being har-
nessed around the waist and froz-
en with ice packs to stop internal
bleeding of a torn rib cartilage.
Oerter's heave left him in front
of world record-holding Ludvik
Danek of Czechoslovakia, who fin-
ished second at 198-6%, and Dave
Weill of Walnut Creek, Calif., who
took the bronze medal with a
195-2.
Shortly before the first round of
the 200-meter dash got under way
in sunshine and temperature that
was in the 70's, Russia's Elena
Gorchakova smashed the world
record for the women's javelin
on her first qualifying throw.
Miss Gorchakova heaved the
javelin 204 feet, 81 inches, near-
ly nine feet better than the old
mark held by Elvira Ozolina, al-
so of Russia Miss Ozolina's mark

The rangy right-hander who the Series. The 22-year-old right-
once played basketball with the hander left for a pinch hitter in
Harlem Globetrotters broke all the fifth after his Yankee de-
Series strikeout records with a fense let him down in the Cards'
total of 31, including nine in the three-run fourth inning.
finale with big money on the line. St. Louis added three more in
A crowd of 30,346 boisterous the fifth, starting off with Lou
fans. roared, trumpets blared and Brock's homer off Al Downing,
horns tooted as the Cardinals com- and finished their scoring with
pleted their rags to riches rise Ken Boyer's homer in the seventh.
from seventh place July 24 to the The Yanks, shut out for five
championship of all baseball at innings, came up with three in
the expense of the proud Yan- the sixth when Mickey Mantle
kees. smashed his own Series record
A tumultous crowd poured out of with his 18th homer, a three-run
the bleachers and surrounded the blast into the bleachers in left
happy knot of white-uniformed center over the 379-foot mark.
Cardinals after Dal Maxvill snar- The home runs by Clete Boyer
ed Bobby Richardson's pop for the and Linz in the ninth served only
final out. Maxvill was warmly to delay the inevitable outcome.
BOWLING LEAGU E
MIXE D DOU BLE TEAMS
SIGN UP NOW-See George
Michigan Uniton Bowling Alleys
:.r::i :v" :: e.___ . _.. 4rt4:":',a"{Yc: : "4r

ST. LOUIS tP)-Iron man Bob
Gibson, working with only two
days rest, pitched the scrappy St.
Louis Cardinals to their first world
championship since 1946 with a
7-5 victory over the favored New'
York Yankees in yesterday's cru-
cial seventh Series game.

embraced by Dick Groat and then
the whole club converged on the
mound, pounding the exhausted
Gibson on the back.
Gibson's opponent, rookie Mel
Stottlemyre, also was attempt-
ing to come back after two days
rest in his third starting job of

,,,y

/'

I
I
I

I

1. Purdue at MICHIGAN
2. MICHIGAN STATE at Indiana
3. ILLINOIS at Minnesota
4. Miami (O) at N'WESTERIY.
5. So. California at OHIO STATE
6. IOWA at Wisconsin
'7. Cincinnati at BOSTON COL.
8. SYRACUSE at Penn State
9. Colgate at PRINCETON
10. Georgia Tech vs AUBURN

11. NO. CAROLINA ST. at Duke
12. ALABAMA at Tennessee
13. OKLAHOMA at Kansas
14. Kansas State at NEBRASKA
15. ULCA at NOTRE DAME
16. RICE at Southern Methodist
17. Texas Christian at. TEX. A&M
18. Arkansas at TEXAS
19. MISSOURI at Air Force
20. Navy at CALIFORNIA

SPORTS STAFF SELECTIONS
RICK PIETERS (Last Week's Winner, 66-33--.835)-Michigan, Michigan State,
Illinois, Northwestern, Ohio Sta.te, Iowa, Boston College, Syracuse, Princeton,
Auburn, Duke, Alabama, Oklahoma, Nebraska, Notre Dame, Rice. Texas A&M,
Texas, Missouri, California.
BILL BULLARD (Sports Editor, 51-28-.646) -. Michigan, Indiana, Illinois,
Northwestern, Ohio State, Iowa, Boston College, Syracause, Princeton, Auburn,
North Carolina State, Alabama, Oklahoma, Nebraska, Notre Dame Rice, Texas
A&M, Texas, Missouri, California.
TOM ROWLAND (Associate Sports Editor, 48-31-.608)-Michigan, Michigan
State, Illinois, Northwestern, Southern California, Iowa, Boston College, Syracuse,
Princeton, Georgia Tech, North Carolina State, Alabama, Oklahoma, Nebraska,
Notre Dame, Southern Methodist, Texas Christian, Texas, Air Force, Navy.
CHARLIE TOWLE (Contributing Sports Editor, 51-28-.646)-Michigan, In-
diana, Illinois, Northwestern, Ohio State, Iowa, Boston College, Syracuse,
Princeton, Auburn, North Carolina State, Alabama, Kansas, Nebraska, Notre
Dame, Rice, Texas A&M, Texas, Missouri, California.
GARY WYNER (Associate Sports Editor, 49-30-.620) - Michigan, Michigan
State, Illinois, Northwestern, Ohio State, Wisconsin, Boston College, Syracuse,
Princeton, Georgia Tech, Duke, Alabama, Oklahoma, Nebraska, Notre Dame,
Rice, Texas A&M, Texas, Air Force, California.
ED BARTSCH (Guest Selector)-Michigan, Michigan State, Illinois, North-
western, Ohio State, Iowa, Boston College, Syracuse, Princeton, Georgia Tech,
Duke, Alabama, Oklahoma, Nebraska, Notre Dame, Rice, Texas A&M, Texas,
Missouri, California,

iKNEE SOCKS

35
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RICK SYGARw
Toronto Spoils
Detroit Opener
DETROIT (') - The Stanley
Cup champion Toronto Maple'
Leafs spoiled Ted Lindsay's com-
ing out party last night, whip-
ping the Detroit Red Wings 5-3
before a record opening game
crowd of 14,233 fans.

1965 FASHION SHOW
everyone invited
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These openings represent unusual opportunities for men of ability.
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