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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

August 25, 1964 - Image 38

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1964-08-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


PAGE SILL

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

BONES, LUNAR SURFACES, ARTIFACTS:

UtJiiAXAUuU

Museums Lure

100,000

Visitors a

Year

f

Nearly 100,000 persons visited
University museums last year to
see exhibits ranging from ancient
bones to a model of a large part
of the moon's surface.
For those who have never look-
ed into the threatening jaws of a
mastodon or a water shrew, the
University Museum is the place
to go.
Occupying two floors and a
balcony, the museum contains a
variety of displays.
The "Hall of Evolution," situ-
ated on the second floor, presents

the plants and animals of past
geological eras.
A skeleton of a "Duckbilled"
dinosaur has a skull weighing
250 pounds and attracts quite a
bit of attention.
Preserved Mastodon
A mastodon, the best preserved
and most complete ever found in
Michigan, sits wearily on its
haunches waiting for visitors to
come up to it on the second
floor. Mounted proudly on the
right wall is a pterodactyl, an

extinct flying reptile, with a wing has -also done much work on a the first quarter of this century.
span of almost 14 feet. new ecology exhibit. Between 1925 and 1936 two major
On the balcony, there is a syn- Other Museums expeditions worked at Karanis in
optic series of Michigan plants and The University Museum is not Egypt and Seleucia in Iraq.
animals. the only one on campus which has The exhibit shows artifacts,
Environmental influences af- public displays. photographs and models of these
fecting the life and growth of The Kelsey Museum of Archae- expeditions.
plants and animals are shown in ology contains an extensive col- 'U' Expedition
the fourth floor displays. There lection from the Mediterranean Since the end of the war, an
are also displays on anthropology, world and from the Near East. expedition from the museum has
geology and astronomy along with Most of the relics on display are been working at St. Catherine's
a planetarium. from expeditions run by the Uni- Monastery at Mt. Sinai in Egypt.
New minerology displays have versity. Seven expeditions were The monastery, built around 550
been set up this year. The museum sponsored by the University in A.D. by the Emperor Justinian, is

. .

I

WelclomAe!
AllMichigan Students,
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of particular importance because
it houses the only known icons
that survived the eighth and ninth
century iconoclast heresy. The ex-
pedition is involved in photo-
graphic work which when develop-
ed will be put on exhibition in
Ann Arbor.
During the past year, an ex-
pedition from the University has
been working in Egypt at Karanis.
These expeditions supply the
Kelsey Museum with its extensive
displays. Jewelry, artwork, food-
stuffs, coins, glass, pottery and
writing materials can be found
throughout the two floors of the
museum,
Art
The University also has many
displays of art which will greet
new and returning students this
fall.
A large variety of periods and
styles in art has been featured in
both special displays and the
permanent collection at the Uni-
versity art museum.
Its permanent collection con-t
tains samples from Byzantine
bronzework to the rich and de-
tailed works of the Flemish mas-
ters. Modern pieces such' as Pi-f
casso's "Horse" and sculptures by
Jean Arp 'are also a part of thel
I collection.
The University art collections
began with former acting Presi-
dent Harry S. Frieze, who served
as curator of the collections untill
his death in 1889. On a European
trip he purchased a collection of
'U' Rents Prints
For Room Use
Prints of well-known paintings
are available for student rooms.
These prints are rented for fromt
25 cents to $1.25 each in the Stu-c
dent Activities Bldg.
Prints range from renaissance1
to abstract works. The service ist
maintained, by the University. Itst
original prints were donated to it,
b'it now a special fund is used toc
extend the rental collection,

GRADUATE STUDENT LOUIS MICHEL works on a scale model of the surface of the moon.
The model is part of the University Museum's permanent collection.
engravings and photographs and The collection, housed on the strings that vibrate when other
copies of classical sculpture to illu- second floor of Hill Aud., shows strings are played.
strate his lectures on the Arts of

Classical Antiquity.
First donation

The first important original
work was donated to the Univer-
sity by alumni in 1862. It was a
sculpture entitled "Nydia," by the
American sculptor Randolph Rog-
ers, who had spent his youth in,
America and who later became
one of the leading figures in the
Classical Revival.
The University collections moved
from one building on campus to
another, until they were finally
established in Alumni Memorial
Hall on its completion in 1910.
Lewis Bequest
In the meantime, almost 500
paintings by European artists of
the 19th century had been request-
ed by the University by Henry;
C. Lewis of Coldwater.
Collections of Egyptian anti-
quties of the first to third cen-
tunies after Christ were expanded
by archaeological expeditions of
Prof. Francis W. Kelsey. They
were the beginnings of the KelseyI
Museum of Archaeology.'
In 1946, the Museum of Art
became an administrative unit,
and the Universty embarked on
an acqiusition program. The Mar-
garet Watson Parker bequest pro-
vided for over 600 items to be
given to the University. This is
"the most important single col-
lection of works of art acquired
by the University to date," Prof.
Charles H. Sawyer, director of the
art museum, said.
Recently, the museum's acquisi-
tion program was extended to in-
clude early Western art since the
Sixth Century A.D., Near and Far
Eastern art including India, but
with emphasis on Japan and
China.
The Stearns Collection of Musi-
cal Instruments shows musical in-
struments as an art form.

j

"instrumentso xneiiaissance Eu- Also shown are several tiny
rope and the Far East when they violins used by dancing masters
had more than just a functional in the 17th Century. The master
use. iwould take the tiny violin out of
shis pocket and use it in conducting
The collection includes colorful an orchestra.
ancestors of guitars with many In former centuries, there were
layers of woodcarvings, highly dec-1Inyfr ce nts,trick
orated and ornate instruments of many freak instruments, Hettrick
17th and 18th century France and remarked. One such nstrument on
Italy and strange instruments of display is a 19th Century cane
the Far East. rlarinet. The idea was that a man
h'ast. Findtaking a walk might get an urge
'Hard tot Find' to play a tune. If he had his cane
"Some instruments in the col- clarinet, he could stop and play.
lection are hard to find in their A French violin on display has
native countries today," collection the carved head of a man with a
curator Prof. Robert Warner of handsome beard. Some of the in-
the music school noted. I struments have had painting and
many have intricate design work.
"We use some of the instruments Tuba Ancestor
in our consorts," William Hettrick, Among the instruments is a
assistant curator, added. The con- French musical serpent, an an-
sorts, directed by Prof. Warner.' estor of the tuba, used first in
are pesentedbyfaculy nd stu- rches. An ophicheide from
dents who play medieval and Ren- Spain is serpent-headed and- was
aissance melodies. Their composi- used for its terrifying; effect.
tions use viols and voice, the viols;AnodFechrnndipa
being six- and -seven-stringed in-an old Fren hornso iscpay
struments shaped like violins, but I hangiagmovabl otiece.f By
not losly elaed o t em.mouthpiece, the musician could
An 18th century Italian viol - get different effects.
the Viola d'Amore-is on display. Beetle-shaped lutes of great
Hettrick noted its "tremendous craftsmanship as the terobo of
resonance" made possible by 17th Century Italy are on display.
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II

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FRESH

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