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October 08, 1964 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1964-10-08

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DATr V

"""A".GEu^ ' TWO.:.. T '1H 1 V1W a~ALI - J. 1 .

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 8,1964

!

Hatcher Gives Views on Progress, Problems

uA BO LD A
"Makes many another
movie musical look
as pale !as6Owatt
nmoonshine'
--Time Magazine

EDITOR'S NOTE: This is the
complete text of University Pres-
ident Harlan Hatcher's "State of
the University" address as deliver-
ed to the faculty Monday night.
The events of the summer of
1964 will not soon be forgotten.
Chief among them was the sen-
sational achievement of Ranger
VII with all cameras clicking,
crashing into the dust on the
moon. It was a dramatic and
sophisticated triumph, bringing
into a single focus, at enrmous
expense, the cooperative powerof
the scientific community. The
same cameras turned back upon
the earth itself would have shown
the dark and menacing craters
of Rochester and Harlem yet to
be explored, understood, a n d
humanized.
The gap and the. incongruity
represented by thisecontrast puz-
zle and challenge the will of edu-
cated men. In one way or anoth-
er, every nation is confronting
this issue. How do we get the
needed knowledge, and acquire
the technical and social skills, to
harmonize the conflicts among
men on this overcrowded planet?
How can we give the precious and
perishable oncoming generation of
youth a richer and more exact un-
derstanding of the nature of
things and how to manage them-
to increase the good and: not to.
perpetuate or increase the evilst
Top Priority
This to my mind is the most ur-
gent of all the matters before us.
The world is looking to its univer-'
sities with high, possibly exces-
sive, expectations. It has in sight
no other agency that can give it

E
}
E
t
r
f
r"

present educational institutions
to care for their need, demand
s o m e extraordinary measures
from institutions of higher educa-
tion. We can no longer expect to
meet this need under the two-
semester program - opening in
late September, breaking up in
January, and concluding in early
June.
It will take some time for the
habits of American citizens to re-
adjust to the impact of this grow-
ing population. But adjustments
will simply have to be made. They
can be made in a fruitful and
happy fashion if we will under-
stand the problem and plan ac-
cordingly.
Crowding Typical
This was dramatically apparent
on campuses all over the nation
this past September. Michigan
was typical. We were crowded
somewhat b e y o n d capacity,
though not very much in percent-
age points, because of the rush for
entrance into this University, as
in others, on the opening day of
the autumn term.
Never again in the course of the
52 weeks will any one of these uni-

by comparison or non-existent.
It is perfectly obvious that in
order to accommodate the millions
of young people now demanding,
and needing, and who must re-
ceive post-high school education,
there will have to be some adjust-
ment as to the time of entrance.
I hope we may continue to explore
this possibility and have entering
classes at this University in Jan-
uary and in May to offset the ex-
cessive demands of the autumn
season.
Need for Additional Funds
Naturally this three-term oper-
ation must have more funds. The
funds required, however, are, for
the most part, for the teaching.
and supporting staff and not for
additional buildings. We, o f
course,. are requesting this item
in our budgets for next year and
the ensuing years.
Since this is a new magnitude
of operation, we face also the
problem of interpreting year-
round enrollments in meaningful
terms in a program where the one
peak autumn registration tradi-
tionally, sets the measuring stand-
ard for the year.
fi

I would like to stress again as
vigorously and as clearly as I can
state it that the third-term opera-;
tion at The University of Michi-
gan is not conceived primarily as
a means of accelerating students'
programs, though they are at per-
fect liberty to accelerate if they
wish. Neither does it change in
any way the residence pattern of
the teaching staff.I
It is entirely a matter of calen-
daring to fit the national habits
of the American people and to,
make for sustained use of these
great and expensive facilities on
the campus. Our teaching staff
will be in residence for two of the
terms, which are the exact equi-
See HATCHER, Page 5

(CITING 'FILM!"~
.-Bosley Crowther, New York Times
" lJOY TO
BEHOLD!"
-N.Y. Journal Americe
i

Leonard S. Gruenborg
Presents
'8tARRINGaan~
CARMEN AMAYA " ANTONIO GADES,*

II NOW

4Q, vAa~I

Dial
8-6416

I N

PRESIDENT HATCHER

DEAN RALPH SAWYER

Across
Campus
THURSDAY, OCT. 8
9 a m. and 1:30 p.m.-The East-
ern Section of the Seismological
Society of America will hold its
public sessions in Rackham Aud.
as part of its annual meeting.
4:10 p.m.-Prof. Will Herberg
of Drew University will speak on
"Existentialism: Religious and
Atheistic" in Rackham Aud.
7:30 p.m.-Rep. George Meader
(R-Mich) will discuss his cam-
paign for reelection to Congress
from the second district in a
Rpeech sponsored by the Young
Republicans in Rm. 3-S of the
Michigani Union.Y
7:g30 .m. The Democrats for
Romney will hold a mass meeting
in Rn. n C of the Michigan Un-
Ion.
8 pm.-A panel discussion en-
titled "Students Challenge' Will
Herberg" will be held in the South
Quad League.
8 p.m.-The APA will perform in
"The Hostage" by Brendan Behan
in Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
8 p.m.-The University Players
will present "Gideon" by Paddy
Chayefsky in Trueblood Aud.
8 p.m.-?rof. L. S. Pentryagin
of the Academy of Sciences of the
Soviet Union will speak in Aud.
B on the Steklov Institute Semi-
nar on Differential Equations.
8:30 p.m.-Antonio and the Bal-
lets de Madrid will perform in
Hill Aud.
FRIDAY, OCT. 9
9 a.mn.-The Medical Center will
hold a "Career Day" for any Uni-
versity students interested in a
medical or other health science
career. Registration, will be in the
fourth floor lobby of the Medical
.Science Bldg.
9 a.m. and 1:30 p.m.--Scientif-
ic and technical sessions will be
held in Racsham Aud. by the
Eastern Section of the Seismolog-
ical Society of America.
8:30 p.m.-R. Sargent Shriver,
director of the Peace Corps and
special assistant to the President,
will deliver an address on the
steps of the Michigan Union.
4 p.m.-B. K. Vaynshteyn, direc-
tor of the Institute of Crystallog-
raphy, the Academy of Sciences
of the U.S.S.R., will speak on "New
Aspects of Structural Analysis of
Crystals" in Rm. 1300 of the
Chemistry Bldg.
4:10 p.m. - Prof. Will Herberg
of Drew University will speak on
"Biblical Faith and Man-made
Religion in Contemporary Ameri-
ca" in Rackham Aud.
8 p.m.-The APA will perform
"The Hostage" by Brendan Behan
in Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
8 p.m.-The University Players
will present "Gideon" by Paddy
Chayefsky in Trueblood Aud.
8 p.m. - Elbert R. Slaughter,
member of the Board of Lecture-
ship of the First Church of Christ,
will speak on "Where Are You
Going" in Aud. A.
8:30 p.m. - The music school
Will hold a composers forum in
the recital hall of the music school.

the needed help. The ramifica-
tions and implications of this are
immense and complicated. They
present the context in which the
University must view its present
state and its future plans and
commitments. We need not be
discouraged.
I greet you at the beginning of
another year in ir long and
fruitful history. And from among
the multitude of matters pressing
upon our joint interests today, I
shall single out a few which seem
to me and to the Senate Advisory
committee to. be of special inter-
est at this particular moment.
Our goals are so high and the
work to be done is so vast that we
can easily 'lose sight 'of the sub-
stantial progress that we have
made. In these terms, we may
say with confidence that we begin
thet new year in better shape than
we were last year.
Praises Study
We give credit to the Blue-Rib-
bon Committee for their devoted
and farsighted work and for their
deep understanding of the urgent
importance of higher education in
this State. Thanks to their strong
recommendation, a helpful addi-
tion was made to the supporting
budgets of the universities. Their
recommendation carried weight
with the Governor and the Legis-
lature. Much of this increment
had to be expended to make up
for ground lost in the last few
years, but a healthy portion of it
has been used to bring the Univer-
sity forward.
If we can now, in this next ses-
sionkofethe Legislature, continue
to make progress along the ,lines
which we have recommended, and
the Blue Ribbon Committee itself
has so vigorously supported, we
may be able to keep abreast of the
times and discharge our leader-.
ship responsibilities with distinc-
tion.
The great automobile companies
and the union are now reaching
new contract agreements. Wage
scales will be higher and benefits
increased. What is done by these
leaders has an immediate effect
on the rest of the nation. New
levels will be set everywhere.
Part of Total Economy
An economic fact of life that
needs more public recognition is
that the universities are a part of
the total economy of this State
and nation. Universities must re-
spond to the same upward pres-
sures that affect every business
and industry in the community.
They can not stand still while a
three-and-one-half to four per
cent per year improvement factor
is introduced into the rest of the
economy. Merely to stay abreast,
therefore, requires each year a
considerable addition to a Univer-
sity's budget.
When we add to this the need
for making up the accumulated
deficit and the need to expand
and improve our educational, re-
search, and service functions in
the interest of the State and its
young people, it should become
clear beyond any possible doubt
that the gains which we have
made in the past year are only a
step forward in the total journey
which we must take.
I feel sure that both of the dis-
tinguished candidates for Gover-
nor of Michigan understand these
important and inescapable facts.
Year-Round Operation
We are now physically geared,
from the point of view of our cal-
endar, to use the total resources
of this University to their maxi-
mum capacity without making
undue or unusual demands upon
any member of the faculty. We
are, in other words, now embark-
ed on a full year-round, three-
term program. The wisdom of this
move will become increasingly ap-
parent as the years unfold.
The growing number of young
men and women with high poten-
tial for education and develop-
ment, and the inadequacy of our

versities havehas many students
as it had at that point." The sec-
ond semester enrollments will be
down considerably from the new
high of the autumn. And the
summer terms will be quite sparse

i- -

CANDIDATE PROFILE:
IlokinUrges Studen
Coorton weS
Cooperation with _SGC

1
EDITOR'S NOTE: This is the
second in a series of six articles
giving sketches of the opinions and
backgrounds of the candidates cur-
rently running for Student Govern-
ment Council.
By NANCY STEIN
"Student Government Council
has a lot of potential that can be
developed only with the aid of
active members and an active stu-
dent body." This is a major con-
cern of Robert Bodkin, '67E, cur-
rently running for SGC.
Bodkin explains that active
leaders are needed to stimulate
and consolidate student opinion
and to arouse student interest.
This unity of opinion will give

terest of the students can make'
SGC a really powerful organiza- i
tion."
Bodkin says he is not contentl
to let SGC continue working as it
has been. "Ad hoc study groups
are not the best way to find solu-
tions for student grievances. SGC,
through some effective committee
structure, must be constantly pre-
pared to present or obtain facts
relative to various problems."
Bodkin urges a greater degree of
communication between SGC and
the student body in order to keep
the entire campus informed. This,
in turn, will create a better re-
lationship between the adminis-
tration and the students.
He cites student housing and
faculty - student participation in
academic affairs as two major
problems facing SGC no*. He
stresses cooperation. among stu-
dents, faculty, property owners
and Inter-Quadrangle Council as
the first step towards eliminating
these problems.
Bodkin has worked as editor of
the SOC Newsletter and the SGC
Report.

Dial 5-6290
Ends Tonight
Alfred Hitchcodk's
"MARNIE"
Starting Friday

11

THURSDAY and FRIDAY
ONLY

PROF. WILL HERBERG

Every year...every kind
of man-woman excitement
rocks the explosive world of
.nnd thefr new loves!

Will Herberg, formerly on the staff
of the Washington School of Psy-
chiatry, and now Graduate Profes-
sor of Philosophy and Culture at
Drew University, is well-known
and well-equipped for his study of
religion in America. His extensive'
writings on religion and social
philosophy have appeared in many
journals and his published books
are many: Protestant-Catholic-
Jew: An Essay in American Relig-
ious Sociology; Judaism and Mod-
ern Man: An Interpretation of
Jewilh Religion; The Writings of
Martin Buber; Four Existentialist
Theologians;. a n d Community,
State and Church: Three Essays by
Karl Barth.

Graduate Professor of Philosophy and Culture,
Drew University
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 8:
4:10 p.m.-t-Rackham Auditorium
"EXISTENTIALISM: RELIGIOUS
AND ATHEISTIC"
8:00 p.m.-South Quad Lounge
"STUDENTS CHALLENGE
WILL HERBERG"
(Challengers: Suzanne Naibury, Roger Price,
Mary E. Bird)
Moderator: Professor John Higham,
Dept. of History, U. of M.
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 9:
4:10 p.m.--Rackham Auditorium
"BIBLICAL FAITH AN:D MAN-MADE
RELIGION IN CONTEMPORARY
AMERICA"
Sponsored by The Office of Religious Affairs
ALL STAFF, FACULTY & STUDENTS ARE WELCOME

Opens TONIGHT
T"THE
BEST MAN"
Thurs. thru Sat.
Trueblood Auditorium
8:00 p.m.
Tickets Available
at Box Office
10 a.m. 'til Curtain
presented by
ANN ARBOR
CIVIC THEATRE

i-

The Greatest
Find Since
Jean Har low!

ROBERT BODKIN

SGC the support it needs to deal
successfully w i t h administration
officials, property owners or the
Regents to improve student wel-
fare, he adds.
"The purpose of SGC is first
to improve student welfare and
second to increase student respon-
sibility," he feels. "Only the in-
I -I

SrwtWG
MICHAEL CALLAR (EAN~JONES TELY SAVALAS
BARBARA EOEN"STEFANIEPOMM -SKAYSTEBES
se INOERSTEVENS " GEORG3E SEW
ere a' eamteerYe m
ftwx nra 3U 0 l _______
tods by N 0 Raw

HER NEWEST

S

ENSATIONI

I

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