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September 25, 1964 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1964-09-25

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN UA IZ.V

PAGE T WO:... a . ... .. :. ..... _ ., 1 111'. - 1 'SS1. W £1 t L. . -.

CULTURES:
ISA Holds Series

-

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t1.. T1L-Iz-.-t----. All ---:19 I

By CAROL HASKILL the Philippines. All countries will
The International Students As- be represented by programs of
sociation, in cooperation with the speakers, discussions dealing with
Michigan Union and the Wom politics and culture and parties
MichganUnin ad te Wrn-at the end ;of each program.
en's League, is sponsoring a six T
part series on the culture and poli- The Greek program took place
tics of six foreign countries. last week, beginning on Tuesday
Nations involved are Greece, Ja- in the Multipurpose Room of the
pan, Germany, China, India and UGLI. The meeting combined a
talk and discussion period, and
was focused on politics. On Wed-
Enrollment of nesday the format was culture and
on Thursday a special talk on
2Cyprus was held at the Union.
103 Sets Friday, the Hellenic Students As-
sociation at the University spon-
All-T sored a party for all involved.
Aug Greater Harmony
David Lundin, Grad, cultural
(Continued from Page 1) chairman of the program, said
The University is second in the that its purpose is to achieve
state in student enrollment. The greater harmony between Amer-
m o s t highly - populated school, ican and foreign students. Spirited
Michigan State University, has not discussions and talks about the
yet started classes. But official politics and culture of a country
predictions indicate that MSU as well as qualified speakers, wil
will become the first Michigan help students understand the
school to top the 30,000 level. many problems these countrie.
The University has repeatedly face. It will aid students in get-
been accused of failing its alleged ting acquainted with the student.
purpose as a state-supported of that country who live here on
school by turning down qualified campus, Lundin said.
state applicants. Officials here By attending these lectures, he
have argued that meager budgets explained, students will learn not
from the legislature make expan- only the facts about the country
sion a difficult problem. but its attitudes, both cultural and
When the University received an political.
unprecedented $44 million from Informal Talk
the legislature last spring, sources "It's a great program, and the
here were reportedly anxious to more people who come, the bet-
show their good faith. ter it will be," he said. "I tell
The University's, breakdown by the speaker to prepare an inf or-
college with the comparison to mal talk> that 'will lead into a
last fall: architecture and design spirited discussion among the stu-
college, 762 (up 28); business ad- dents who live in the country, the
ministration school, 1023 (up 21es whdv himself and American
Dearborn Campus, 664 (up 78),sekrhmefadAeia
dentstr schol,450 dow 6)students.
dentistry school, 450 (down 6), "The program is dedicated to.
enucinicol 11g,3079 (up 173): the excitement of'getting a little
Flint College, 636 (up 34); gradu- closer to the common denomina-
ate school, 6920 (up 316); Law tor of human existence throug
School, 1075 (up 68); literary col- personal contact with a vastly
lege,, 9536 (up 757); Medical removed and greatly differing cul-
School, 1358 (up 54); music school, ture. But the program will be in-
677 (up 64). teresting only as long as people
The remaining figures indicate: come."
natural resources school, 227 (up Lundin is interested in the cul-
31); nursing school, 734 (down tural aspect of the program and
24); pharmacy college, 143 (up thinks it the most valuable. He
26); public health school, 244 (up says that "we can learn more
4); social work school, 394 about American culture if we first
(up 39). learn about foreign cultures." ,

-Daily-Steve Smilack
NORTH CAMPUS GETS CENTER
A new center for faculty and students will provide a home-like atmosphere to the fast-growing
North Campus. The new meeting place, now under construction, is expected to be completed this
summer. This center is only one of the complex of buildings involved in the North Campus expan-
sion project.
SUSPENDS RULES:

Brook Sees
Apathy in
'U' Studentst
Douglas Brook, '65, executivEt
vice-president of Student Govern-
ment Council, spoke on studentt
participation in campus activitiez
Wednesday afternoon at the Pan-i
hellenic Presidents' Council meet-1
ing.
Brook said that there is a seri-
ous problem with student partici-C
pation in activities on campus. Hef
attributed this apathy in part t
the academic pressures of the tri-
mester system and in part to the,
activities themselves.
"Perhaps the organizations arc
not pressuring hard enough to get'
students interested in participat-I
ing " Brook said. He particularly
stressed the problem SGC is no .
facing in getting students inter-
ested in working on its commit-
tees.,
Need People
"We have one of the finest stu-
dent government organizations ir
the country, but it is not going
to stay that way unless we get
people," Brook stressed, "We have
access to all administration of-!
fices, but if we let our activities'
go we are going to lose the right
to be heard on campus," he con-
tinued.
The rest of the meeting was de-
voted to discussion of the nation-
al conventions that many of th
sorority presidents had attendee
this'-summer.
The general consensus of opin
ion seemed to be that the dele
gates from the University chapter,
had more to offer than they had
'to gain. "I found myself giving
solutions to problems that we
have already faced and that oth-
er campuses are just beginning tc
face, such as liberalization of
women's hours," Sarah HobermanI
'65, president of Delta Gamma
commented.

Across Campus
Graduate degree recipients from ing Japan at .the International
the business administration schoo. Cen.er.
continue to be eagerly sought by * * *
United States business and indus- 8 p.m.-The APA will present
try, the University reports. Dur- "War and Peace" by Piscator in
ing the past academic year more Lydia Mendel.ssohn Theatre.
than 300 top companies in the * *
nation sent recruiters to the bus- 8 p.m.-The Americans to De-
iness administration school. feat Goldwater will hold its third
* * * general meeting at the Ann Arbor
FRIDAY, SEPT. 25, 1964 Public Library. Addressing the
7 p.m.-The International Stu- meeting will be Carolyn Dana
dents Association will sponsor. a Lewis, recent Republican candi-
folk and cultural evening featur- date for the state Legislature and
Weston E. Vivian, Democratic
candidate for Congress from the
*second district.

4

* * *
8:30 p.m.-The Chicago Sym-
phony Orchestra, conducted by
Jean Martinon, will open the
Choral, Union concert series at
Hill Aud. Martinon will conduct
Brahm's "Symphony No. 3," De-
bussy's "La Mer" and the Suite
from Bartok's "The Miraculous
Mandarin."
SATURDAY, SEPT..26
5 and 9 p.m.-The APA will pre-
sent Piscator's "War and Peace"
in Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
* * *
8 p.m.-The International Cen-
ter will sponsor a reception fot
foreign students. Following a wel-
coming address in Rackham 'Aud.,
there will be a reception in the
Michigan League Ballroom.

1

A

SGC Makes AFECIGGE Official

I

By KAREN KENAH
Student Government Counci'
granted ad hoc recognition to
Americans for Emigration to Can-
ada if Goldwater Gets Elected at
its Wednesday night meeting.
Local Group
For Democrats
Prof. Arnold S. Kaufman has
announced the formation of r
University of Michigan branch of
Citizens for Johnson-Humphrey
The branch will be part of a
national group working inde-
pendently of political parties for
the 'election of Lyndon B. John-
son and Hubert H. Humphrey on
November 3.

In other action it heard a re-
port from Health Insurance Co-
ordinator Edward Heiser, Grad.
SGC, in granting ad hoc rec-
ognition to AFECIGGE had tc
suspend the rules as the usual
two week lapse between appli-
cation for recognition and review
by SGC was not observed. How-
ever, time is important in the
case of the new organization and
the two-thirds majority to sus-
pend the rules was obtained.
Ad hoc recognition lasts only
for the duration of a specific per-
iod during which the organization
wishes to work.
Heiser reported on the possi-
bility of offering the life insur-
ance plan which is being backed

by United States National Stu-
dents Association on the Univer-
sity campus as SGC-supported in-
surance. He said that he person-
ally feels that even if it were
possible for SGC to support it,
It would be unwise because-of the
nature of life insurailce.
It is a commitment that con-
cerns students not only during
school but after they have gradu-
ated.
However, Heiser said, Vice-Pres-
ident for Student Affairs James'
Lewis feels- that it would be im-
possible for SGC to support it in
any event, although he did not
specify the reason.
The meeting adjourned at 8:45
p.m.

CONDUCTOR MARTINON

B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation
invites' all toI

THE ANNUAL SUKKOT
OPEN HOUSE

Sun., Sept. 27

Vl

2-5 p.m.

1429 Hill Street

7'

r.. AlILY 0OFFIC IAL' B ULEI
4 ... . ..... . ..... ' " -r 1 .v ._.,.... .,1. , .. , . ... . . . ..'. . ..:44:" {.44."r ::.
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The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editorial
responsibility. Notices should be sent
in. TYPEWRITTEN form to Room
3564'Administration Building before
2 p.m.' of the day preceding publica-
tion, and by 2 p.m. Friday for Satur-
day and Sunday.
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25
Day Calendar
Dept. of Biological Chem. Colloquium
-The Dept. of Biological' Chem.. and
MHRI will present the "Active Trans-
port of Glycine by Pigeon Red Cells"
by Dr. George A. Vidaver on Fri., Sept.
25, at 4 p.m. in M6423 Med. Sci.
Iy f~lnm DIAL 2-6264

Bureau of Industrial Relations Per-
sonnel Techniques Seminar - George S.
Odiorne, Professor of Industrial Re-
lations, University of Michigan, "Hu-
man Problems in Quality Control":
Third Floor Conference Room, Michi-
gan Union, 8:30 a.m.
Cinema Guild-Hitchcock's "The Lady
Vanishes" with"Michael Redgrave, Mar--
garet Lockwood, and Paul Lucas, Archi-
tecture Aud., 7 and 9 p.m.
Professional Theatre Program - APA
Repertory Company in Tolstoy's "War
and Peace": Mendelssohn Theatre, 8
p.m.
University Musical Society Choral Un-
ion Concert--Chicago 'Symphony ,Or-
chestra, Jean Martinon, conductor: Hill
Aud., 8:30 p.m.
General Notices
Linguistics Dept. Doctoral Preliminary
Examinations: The dates for the doc-
toral preliminary examinations for the
Linguistics Dept. are Fri. and Sat., Nov.
6 and 7. Any student who wishes to
take a prelim this semester must no-
tify the departmental office of his in-
tention to do so and which exam he
wishes to take before Oct. 1.
Doctoral Examination for William Ar-
nold Brown, Physics; thesis: "Oscilla-
tor Strengths of Lead Spectral Lilies:
A Shock 'Tube Measurement,"' Wed.,
Sept. 30, 629 Physics-Astronomy Bldg.,
at 2 p.m. Chairman, Otto Laporte.
Language Exam for Master's Degree
in History: Fri., Oct. 2, 4-5 p.m., 429
Mason Hall. Dictionaries may be used.
Sign the list posted in the History
Office, 3601 Haven Hall.
History Make-up Exams: Sat., Oct.

3, 10-12 a.m., 429 Mason Hall. Con-
sult your instructor and sign the list
in the History Office, 3601 Haven Hall.
Make-up Final Exams for German 101,
102, 111, 231, 232, and 236: Mon., Sept.
2, from 7 to 9 p.m. in Room 3012 FB.
Students who were absent, from last
semester's final and wish to write the
make-up exam are to obtain permission
from their former instructor to do so,
and report to the German Department
Office by noon Mon., Sept. 28.
Fall Semester Fees: At least 50 per
cent is due and payable on or before
Sept. 30, 1964.
Non payment of at least 50 per cent
by Sept. 30 will result in the -assess-
ment of a delinquent penalty of $5.
Payments may be made in person or
mailed to the Cashier's/ Office, 1015
Administration Bldg., before 4:30 p.m..
Wed., Sept. 30, 1964.
Mail Early.
Mail Payments postmarked after due
date, Sept. 30, 1964, are late and sub-
ject to penalty.
Identify mail payments as tuition
and show student number and name.
The Mary Louisa Hinsdale Scholarship
amounting to $214.40 (interest on the
endowment fund) is available to under-
graduate single women who are wholly
or partially self-supporting and who do
not live in University dormitories or
sorority houses. Residents of Hender-
son House and Oxford Housing may
apply. Girls with better than 'average
scholarship and need will be considered,
The Lucile B. Conger Scholarship and
Margaret H. Waterman Scholarship are
offered to undergraduate women on the
basis of academic performance, contri-
bution to University life and financial
(Continued on Page 8)"

PANHELLENIC PRESENTS
the
Brothers
f four.
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 3
8:30. HILL AUDITORIUM
Block Tickets Sept. 28
General Sales Begin Sept.29
$2.25 $2.00 $1.75 '

ATTENTION:
HOUSE HOMECOMING
CHAIRMEN
Listen to WAAM Saturday morning at 9:00
for the announcement of the 'place
where Display Petitions will be accepted
Of suspense, pursuit and courage..

I

Is

I

IF

i
',

i

A RARE MOTION PICTURE...
BRILLIANT PERFORMANCE!
UFEMagazine
IWARK IT MUST
xSEE! ONE OF
THE BEST!I"
--Cst, Head Tribune
9NOWAT THE

AknN
ARB
PRESENTS ITS
1964-65 PLAYBILL,
THE BEST MAN Oct. 15-17
Gore Vidal's timely drama
GYPSY Dec. 9-12
A ".Natughty but Nice" musical fable
NIGHT OF THE IGUANA Feb. 4- 6
Tennessee Williams' classic
CANDIDA Mar. 4-.6
G. B. Shaw's amusing varient on
the theme of the Eternal Triangle
SHOT IN THE DARK Apr. 22-24
Mystery and Mirth
SEASON TICKET PRICES
Thursday $6.00; Friday & Saturday $7.00
Special small theatre party group rate:
6 season tickets for the price of 5

L Wowe

.i

red Hitchcock and Federico Fellini This Weekend r
r
DIAL 662-88r1
I" - - 8 .- -....- 8 -1 - - -.r

Name

E

I

IAddress:

Phone: ______or_______ ?ate:

1 11 1 1

RI crI I -tr-n o,en-,, nTickts ns follows-

III

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