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September 18, 1964 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1964-09-18

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Seventy-Fifth Year
EDrrED AND MANAGED BY STUDENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY Of MICHIGAN
UNDER AUTHORITY' OF BOARD IN CONTROL OF STUDENT PUBLICATIONS
Where Opinions Are Free' 420 MAYNARD ST., ANN ARBOR, MICH. NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
Truth Will Prevail
Editorials printed in The Michigan Daily ex press the individual opinions of staf f writers
or the editors. This must be noted in all reprints.

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 1964

NIGHT EDITOR: JOHN KENNY

Honors Housing: Right
Strategy, Wrong Tactics

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GROWTH OF REPUBLICANISM:
The Coming Southern
Two-Party System

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TH EXPERIENCE of living in the resi-
";dente halls seldom is intellectually
stimulating or educationally broadening.
A group of men or women, half or more
of whom have never seen each other or
the University before, would not be ex-
pected to debate the problems of the
world or to associate with one an-
other on a very deep basis. And they don't.
People become friends with those they
find themselves easiest to become friends
with, and they talk about the things that
are easiest to talk about.
THIS IS THE CASE for honors hous-
ing. Putting honors students together
is one way, though perhaps not a very
good one, of providing some kind of com-
mon ground that will: allow people to
tread a little more securely. Knowing
others share something more with him
than admission to the University-even
if that something is no more than a de-
sire for a higher gradepoint-makes a
student more willing to reveal himself
and more interested in learning about
others. The more one knows he has in
common vwith the rest, the more he can
afford to have seen the ways in which
he is different.
Furthermore, the image associated with
honors housing makes intelleetual dis-
cussions more :widely condoned, if not
actually called for. Students in honors
housing are expected by their peers to
delve into intellectual issues; in other
housing such excursions are, at best, per-
missible.
IF A STUDENT had only one goal in life
--that of getting better grades than
those around him-honors housing might
make him study more than he other-
wise would. But there are probably few
people like this. Instead, there are those
who wish to prove themselves smarter
than their associates and there are those
who want to get good grades regardless of
what others are doing.
The first will probably be somewhat
put in their place by honors housing, or
at least will themselves be suffering from
their equally obnoxious companions. And
perhaps only in an atmosphere such as
H. NEIL BERKSON, Editnr
' KENNETH WINTER EDWARD HERSTEN
Managing Editor ' Editorial Director
ANN GWIRTZMAN.............. Personnel Director
MICHAEL SATTINGER ... Associate Managing Editor
JOHN KENNY ............ Assistant Managing Editor
DEBORAH BEATTIE ...... Associate Editorial Director
LOUISE LIND ........Assistant &litorial Director in
Charge of the Magazine
BILL BULLARD ........................ Sports Editor
TOM ROWLAND .............. Associate Sports Editor
GARY wYNER...............Associate Sports Editor
CHARLES TOWLE.........Contributing Sports Editor
Business Staff
JONATHON R. WHITE, Business Manager
JAY GAMPEL.............Associate Business Manager
JUDY GOLDSTEIN...............Finance Manager
"BAPNARA JOHNSTON...........Personnel Manager
SYDNEY PAUKER:... ....:......Advertising Manager
RUTH SCHEMNITZ ............... Systems Manager
.'TNOR MANAGERS: Bonnie Cowan, Sue Crawford,
Joyce Feinberg, Judy Fields Judy Grohne, Sue
Sucher, Pat Termini, Cy Welman.
ASSISTANT MANAG3ES: Harriet Adler, Harry Bioch,
Sam Chafetz Lynne Edestein, Julie Emerson. Drs
Glantz, Jeff Leeds, Gail Levin, Sue Mikuisi Sue
Perlstadt Judy Popovits, Jill Toser..
The Asociatd Press s exclusively entitled to the
use of all news dispatches credited to it or otherwise
credited to the newspaper. All rights of re-publication
of all other matters here are also reserved.
Published daily Tuesday through Sunday morning.
Subscription rates: $4.50 semester by carrier ($5 by
maul)$8 yearly by carrier ($9 by aal).
Second lass pstage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich.

honors housing provides could the "chain-
ed to the desk" type be coaxed out of his
little room and induced to think about
more than his homework.
THIS DOES NOT MEAN that honors
housing is without its dangers. Let-
ters written to The Daily by freshmen
who extol the virtues of honors housing
without having experience with any oth-
er type suggest that a dangerous atti-
tude may be forming among some honors
housing residents.
In addition there is the possibility that
the "intellectual atmosphere" may be-
come too pervasive. Things could reach
a point where everyone felt compelled
to study or think great thoughts at the
expense of personal development in less
purely cerebral directions. At the mo-
ment there is some evidence that this
much -discussed anti - intellectualism in
reverse has set in.
Then, too, there is a question of de-
mocracy. Though nothing may be lost by
removing some honors students from the
rest of the residence halls, there is an
element of unfairness in treating this
chosen group in a special way. Honors
housing is working not so much because
its residents are smart and scholarly but
because they are influenced by an at-
mosphere which encourages intellectual
interest. Such an atmosphere could be
brought to other houses; they deserve its
benefits as much as honors students do.
THESE PROBLEMS could be solved by
modifying the criteria and name for
honors housing. Some housing would be
broken down along subject lines, with
subject names occasionally being as broad
as "academic." Renaming honors housing
"academic housing" might be the first
step in such a program; other, more spe-
cifically-titled houses could be created as
the program grew.
At the same time-and there is no rea-
son why this time could not be spring,
1965-the requirements to admission to
what is presently called honors housing
should be changed. A student's interest
in being in an environment more intel-
lectual than the typical residence hall
would be the sole criterion for his admis-
sion.
With about half of the group now in
honors housing returning to those houses
next fall, and with this group already
coming close to the intellectually-orient-
ed criterion that would be set up, little
of the present atmosphere would be lost.
But the unpleasant implications of "hon-
ors" housing would be done away with,
others who wanted its advantages would
find it available, and snobbery would be
curtailed.
THE IMPORTANT POINT about any se-
lective housing scheme is that a prop-
er balance be maintained between what
residents have in common and what they
differ on. To give students living together
too little in common is to make for in-
security and consequent superficial dis-
cussions and relations. To give them too
much in common is to rule out the very
possibility of an enriching experience.
The typical residence hall houses suf-
fer greatly from the former. Honors hous-
ing is a good compromise, but it is han-
dled the wrong way. Improvements can
be made. They should be, quickly.
-EDWARD HERSTEIN
Editorial Director

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' FOR A. IAWNUTE TNAERE 1 T

WvE' ? LOST .Y OUl.

By HAROLD WOLMAN
DESPITE PREDICTIONS to the
contrary, a Goldwater victory
in the South this November would
not establish that area as a con-
servative Republican stronghold.
Instead, it is more likely that the
South would become an area of
fairly even two-party competition.
The South has never been the
uniformly conservative enclave it
has acquired the reputation of
being, except on the issue of civil
rights. Indeed, there has always
been a strong liberal (perhaps
radical) element within the
southern Democratic Party which
has often been violently at odds
with the southern conservatives.
This liberal-conservative split
within the southern Democrats
has traditionally divided along
geographic lines. The upland, back
country areas of few Negroes and
small farms are often fervent in
the advocation of social and eco-
nomic welfare measures. It is the
lowland former plantation area,
'the black belt, which has been the
fertile area of southern conser-
vatism. These elements have unit-
ed regularly only on civil rights
issues.
IN CONGRESS, representatives
from these rural Populist areas
have been strong supporters of
federal social and economic wel-
fare programs such as public
works, agricultural supports and
aid to education. They have also
heartily approved 'of the public
power activities performed by the
government-owned TVA.
The list of southern Democratic
congressmen who have consistently
voted for the liberal programs es-
poused by their northern counter-
parts (and indeed, often initiated
by a southerner) is an impressive
one. Senators Gore (Tenn), Yar-
borough (Tex), Fubright (Ark),
Sparkman (Ala) and Long (La)
certainly belong on such a list.
In addition, there are several
more moderate southerners who
are also well within the ideological
framework of the Democratic
Party. These include Senators
Smathers (Fla), Johnston (S.C.)
and Hill (Ala).
The House, too, harbors a goodly
number of southern Democrats
who are of a moderate and liberal
persuasion.
IT IS DIFFICULT to envision
these men who, in social and eco-
nomic outlook, are liberals sud-
denly switching their allegiance to
the party of Barry Goldwater. It
is just as difficult to envision their
congressional districts sending
conservatives to office. For these
are areas where there are rela-
tively few Negroes, and itseems
unlikely they will be easily pan-
icked into voting Republican by
the fear of Negro domination-
Sespecially when .they may be
greatly dependent on federal aid
programs opposed by the GOP.
Then, to6, even with the switch
rof real. southern conservative
Democrats into the Republican
ranks, all is not likely to be joy
'and harmony within .the GOP.
Traditionally, Republican strength
in the South has been confined to
isolated pockets which were pro-
union during the Civil War These
areas are largely inhabited by

mountaineers and back woodsmen,
and their Republicanism is not
of the same order as .Barry Gold-
water's.
Also, in some southern states,
notably Georgia and Miss'sippi,
the Republican Party s 'ved as
the party of moderation On civil
rights for those few individuals
who dared take such a ptsition. In
other states, however, Republican
organizations were simply skeletal,
manned by political opportunists
who hoped to take advantage of
patronage positions when the Re-
publicans gained control in Wash-
ington.
* * *
THESE GROUPS are now being
challenged by the new breed of
Goldwater-oriented southern Re-
publicanism as exemplified by
Mississippi's Wirt Yerger and
Alabama's John Grenier. A spirit-
ed battle for control of the party
has been waged throughout the
southern states, and as of now the
Goldwater forces appear to have
solidly obtaietd the upper hand.
However, the dissident elements
are still there, ands further or-
ganizational fights can be pre-
dicted in the future.
For the South as a whole, the
Republican breakthrough may re-
sult in a lessening of influence in
national politics, at least on the

4

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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR:
Paint Splash in East Quad

4

SEN. STROM THURMOND
Lone Turncoat?

To the Editor:
FOR THE PAST WEEK painters
have been ranging the hails of
East Quadrangle in search of
rooms to paint. I became suspi-
cious of their methodical foraging
which seemingly consisted of
painting every room whether it
needed it or not. This hypothesis
became clearer whenmmy staff
counsellor informed me on Fri-
day my room and all yellow rooms
on our floor were to be painted
today.
Although I was prepared to bar
their entry to my humble estab-
lishment this morning; the men
in white struck while I was at
breakfast, stripped the walls of
myriads of priceless art treasures
(my Beatles picture, calendars,
and several signs), stuffed my be-
longings into my desk drawers, re-
moved the door, hauled my desk
and two chairs into the unguarded
hall, situated my bed in the cen-
ter of the room and covered it
vith a well-splattered dropecloth.
I was waiting for their leader
when he returned, and I demon-
strated that my room simply didn't
need painting as some friendly
gremlin had obviously spent much
of his summer purging my pre-
viously filthy walls and returning
them to a wonderful yellow luster.
In reply, King Latex said, "Well,
we didn't look at this room on
Friday, and so now we're going to
paint it."
* * *
FELLOW RESIDENTS, my room
is but one which is being unneces-
sarily painted. Is this one of the
reasons we were "asked" to con-
tribute a $34 room and board
addition this year? Let's try to
stop some of this bureaucratic
waste before it goes any farther
than it already has.
-Tom Hackett, '65
T icket Quota
To the Editor:
L AST WEDNESDAY I blundered
into a very interesting situa-
tion. I had taken my motor scooter
to do some shopping on State
Street, and to my surprise, .had

found an ideal parking place right
next to another scooter in front
of one of the local book stores. I
went into the store and was doing
my shopping when I happened to
look out the front window and see
a policewoman across the street
leaning over the scooter next to
mine, putting the finishing touches
on a parking ticket. I rushed out
of the store, ran over to her, and
anxiously asked why the scooters
were being ticketed, whereupon
she answered, "Do you know how
to read?"
With that intelligent reply to
add to my bewilderment, she
pointed to a sign about five or ten
yards away that said, "For Bi-
cycles Only." The sign was placed
precisely above a grey wooden
bicycle rack sitting in the street.
I tried to explain my confusion to
her.'
" "ITHOUGHT the sign only per-
tained to the bike rack," I ex-
plained. "It's situated right over
it."
"Well, you're wrong!" she came
back. "It's very clear that you're
parked illegally."
Seeing only slim possibility of
truth in what she said, but find-
ing myself in no position to argue,
I did what any other red-blooded
University student would have
done-tried to talk my way out of
it.
Groping for time and a plan of
action,weakly feigned humor and
asked her what her real ulterior
motive was for giving us the
tickets. She said quite somberly
that she was evil.
"Aw, come on now, seriously,
why are we getting these tickets,"
I stumbled on.
SHE LOOKED AT ME a mo-
ment, and then in a quite heated
tone of voice said, "Now look,
young man, I had to teach school
all morning this morning, and
I've still got a day's quota to meet
before today's over so they'll know
I've been doing my job around
here." She looked at me sort of
funny, then hastily turned and
walked away.

I didn't get the ticket, but yet
I somehow feel very guilty about
the whole affair. I keep wondering,
"Did I do the right thing?" If
that poor policewoman fell one
short of her ticket quota last
Wednesday, there is no telling
what they might do to her-and
I'm to blame!
-Barry M. Thall, '68
Levy Advertisement
To the Editor:
OPEN LETTERS to America's
youth often have an impor-
tant purpose unless they are de-
void of wisdom and reason and
fairness. A case in point #s the
large letter (ad?) on Page 7 of
Tuesday's Daily signed by an
Isaac D. Levy of Philadelphia, Pa.
This letter is so clearly naive, in-
accurate, filled with adolescent.
immaturity and reactionary tan-
trum, it represents an insult to
the intelligence of the students at
the University, whether or not
they support Senator Goldwater's
political views. I am surprised the
editors of The Daily displayed
such poor judgement and low
ethical standards by printing it.
"Does anything go?"
Undoubtedly intelligent mem-
bers of the opposition party can
find (and have found) much with
which they can disagree concern-
ing Senator Goldwater's positions
on various issues. This is as it
should be. When attention. is fo-
cused on issues, forcefully and
factually presented, a great ser-
vice is done to the people of
America. Then the two-party sys-
tem is working to our benefit and
we can logically exercise our right
to a clear choice. But the arro-
fant hate, character assasination,
and incitement to violence em-
bodied in Mr. Levy's letter con-
tributes nothing to the debate ex-
cept to disqualify its author as a
serious participant and to reveal
him as a frustrated, intellectually
empty sensationalist.
*' * *
INCIDENTLY, who is this Isaac
D. Levy and whom does he repre-.
sent? Was his letter a paid ad?
If so, who paid for it? These are
questions, I suggest, the Daily
editors have a responsibility to
answer publicly. They should know
and let us know for whom they
are working.
-John A. Clark
Professor of Mechanical
Engineering
Isaac D. Levy's letter was a paid
advertisement and should have
been so noted.
-E. H.
SGC Group Members
To the Editor:
I WISH to correct the error that
appeared in David Block's story
on the SGC committee that ap-
peared in Wednesday's paper, and
to add a point or two that he
omitted.
Barry Bluestone, '66, and not
Diane Lebedeff, '65, is the fourth.
SGC member on the committee.
John Feldkamp, advisor to SGC
fvrn a he ( A aittended Monndas

congressional level. Southern Dem-
ocrats presently have strength far
beyond their numbers in Congress
because of the seniority system
which determines committee
chairmen.
Many Southern congressmen
have piled up a great deal of
seniority since there was little
chance they would be defeated by
token Republican opposition.
Should a competitive two-party
system develop in the South, as it
.seems certain will be the case,
southerners will not be able td
maintain their hold on committee
chairmanships, for incumbents will
go down to defeat before the op-
position party.
* **
SIMILAR considerations are
likely to discourage any powerful
southern Democrats from taking
the same course Strom Thurmond
did in switching parties. Thur-
mond (S.C.) did not have any
committee chairmanships, so he
had relatively little to lose by de-
serting the Democrats. But the
same cannot be.said for conserva-
tive senators like James Eastland
(Miss). Eastland is chairman of
the important judiciary commit-
tee, a post he would lose if he
changed parties.

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'LIVELY SET':
Same Old Thing Gets
Worse Each Fling

At the State Theatre
"FOR EVERY FAD there must
be a movie" appears to be the
unswervable tenet. of the Holly-
wood upper echelons. As such,
"The Lively Set" aptly'runs over
the Hot-Rod craze.
Once upon a time there was a
sudden splurge of class-B Rock
films starring John Saxton, Sal
Mineo and the like. The basic plot
line has remained, only the faces
have been changed in order to
protect somebody. With respect to
"The Lively Set," John Saxton's
role is assumed by James Darren,
and Sal Mineo'.s by Pamela Tiffin.
Doug McClure is the like.
* .. '.

F EIFFER
HE1. N MY' W INE 5 r-
TDOSLEP VURV NI$HT
L4ER FAVOacT T i': "WHY
Af1N' C1 ' Uti? NIW T O M
ANYMORP NY?"WiY'
CAN'T I L.EN BE. MDRE UKE
MY O~ ? M T R7'41Y EARS
OF A ,A1 MARPIA&S. NO7T
A PEP OU1' OF !P.

L /

,A06IE, MY/ M (txt2 $4Y
COMES' HOM E Bt-
ING TvJ1CE A GEEK:
'1Th I GANG, H NESAV;.
WNY CAN T TH (E 6E :
C(41L f l-ALOR L4KE (N
THE~ OLD DAYS .WHERE
K(PDS WENT INT7o TAE
FACTORY AT rE~N AND
sTAYEPO .UT OCF T1zCVB.?

'A9
1(
MOIIN&

8RINGS fNOME a L)
NOT EVE~N (N OU(
CAN T "PE LKICI
wtiRE YU CcVL.p
Ge5t a BUY (N
T2)BUC FDR 7 1lAA1

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UNLESS you happen to be of
that peculiar breed of creature
whose idea of heaven is a gas-
exhaust filled room wired for
sound, playing an endless tape of
the gear-shifting squeals of as-
sorted mnodifieds, perhaps you
should avoid the State Theatre for
a while. In fact, even if you are a
car fan, you should stay away.
For the only decent portion of
the entire film is some of the
photography of the racing cars,
and even that is hampered by
constant shots of Darren's deter-
mined and grease-smeared, highly
cosmetic smile. Don't movie actors
ever sweat?
* *V *
THE GENERAL CONCEPT of
the movie, plot and all, seems to
be right out of Everyboy's Hot-
Rod Fancy. It's only too bad that
they went further and let the boy
direct it. "The Lively Set" is so

IN FACT, the liveliest portion
of "The Lively Set" appeared in
the intense and zealous rush for
the door at its conclusion by
those brave few who forced them-
selves to remain. They'll never
make that mistake again.
-Hugh Holland
'DOCTOR':
It Needs
One f
At the Campus Theatre
THEN THERE is British comedy,
which can be described with a
single monosyllable - wit. From
Shakespeare to.Shaw and through
Swift, wit has permiated the Eng-
lish language, even into the polit-
ical arena. Maybe the isolation of
those islanders has made them
look in on themselves and accept
their idiosyncracies with a final
joviality that is missing from the
comedy of any other nation I can
think of.
Now, unfortunately, this is what
is wholly absent from a current
attraction of the silver screen,
"Doctor in Distress." Wit should
be acidic, but this is all too often
basic. It thinks that if it lets its
plants down once in a while, but
always with a stiff-upper lip, it
will be accepted as comedy.
* * *
"MAKE MINE a mistress and

K(Q U'OWAN AT TE

t $TAY UP VAUF'
£Vt 2V Nk1'HT

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