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September 16, 1964 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1964-09-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

WEDNESDAY, SEPT MI3ER 16, 1 4

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PACE :

WEDNESDAY, ~EPTEMJ3ER 16, 1964 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PA (1W TU~WU'

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Health Care
WASHINGTON (P) -- The ad- son can find a formula to keep it
ministration's program of health alive.
care for the elderly suffered a Administration forces had de-
possible fatal setback yesterday cided earlier in the day that, with-
in the House. out enough backing for a test
vote on the bill before the whole
Without even a token fight, its House, they would not press for'
supporters permitted a - Senate- a showdown.
passed bill linking medical care Only Four Supporters
to an expanded social security Of the 12 men who will decide+
program to go to a Senate-House the fate of the measure in the
conference. The legislation will conference, eight are known op-
meet almost certain death there ponents. Only four are avowed
unless President Lyndon B. John- supporters.

RELATIONS WITH HUNGARY:
PlanSuffrs~Vatican Reveals Accord
VATICAN CITY -The Vaticar f viction of Cardinal Mindszenty fo members and to provide religiou,
(i *7 1 1 /'1 E '' ''U U 4 and Communist Hungary signec treason in a sensational 1949 show instruction.

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Their final recommendations
must be acted on by both the'
Senate and the House.
What is popularly known as the
Medicare provision was added by
the Senate on Sept. 2 to a House
bill to broaden the social secur-
ity program and increase month-
ly payments to persons on the so-
cial security pension roles. The
Senate dote on the amendment
one of more than 60 changes
made by that body, was 49 to 44.'
Health care backers in the

PATHET LAO LEADER:
Propose Laotian Cease-Fire

By The Associated Press
PAR IS (lP)-Prince Souphanou-
vong, leader of the pro-Commu-
nist Pathet Lao party in Laos,
' yesterday proposed a cease-fire on
the strategic Plaine des Jarres
and offered to give up positions
conquered by Pathet Lao troops
since June 24, 1962.
Some quarters interpreted the
proposal as a possibility to break
the deadlock among the three La-
otian princes who have been meet-
ing intermittently in France for
a month to establish ground rules
for a formal conference.
Souphanouvong made his pro-
posal to Prince Souvanna Phouma,
' neutralist premier of Laos. Sou-
vanna Phouma has been insist-
ing that the Plaine des Jarres be
neutralized before any progress
could be made in the talks.
L ast year, Souphanouvong re-
fused all attempts to grant the
same neutralization on Souvan-
na's request. He refused because
of alleged U.S. aggression in the
area.
The substance of Souphanou-
vong's position was given to re-
porters by Phoumi Vongvichit, in-
formation minister and spokes-
man for the Pathet Lao.
There was no immediate indi-
cation of the reaction of Sou-
vanna Phouma. It was reported
however, that he was instructing
Gen. Kong Le, neutralist chief of
staff, to contact Col. Deuane, a
former neutralist officer who de-
fected with his troops. The Pathet
Lao captured positions on the

Plaine des Jarres after his defec-
tion. The neutralist position ma
depend on the outcome of these
military talks, which would takt
place in Laos.
Rightist informants said they I
had no objections to the new pro-,
posal by Souphanouvong.

The Pathet Lao leader said that1
before his plan could be put lntc
effect "Col. Deuane must come tc
an agreement with Gen. Kong Le
and the cease-fire commission
must be reactivated." The cease-
fire commission, made up of mem-
bers from Canada, Poland and In-
dia, was set up in Vientiane after
the 1962 Geneva accords.

House, led by Rep. Cecil R. King
(D-Calif), made no effort to dis-
guise their pessimism. King tol
newsmen he has only "a faint'
hope" that the program could be
revived this year.
Political Agenda
The decision not to seek an
early showdown-a maneuver that
all but swept the program off the
congressional calendar and put
it on the political campaign agen-
da-came as a surprise to report-
ers.
"We surrendered to the reali-
ties," one of the administration
House leaders said privately. "W
just didn't have the votes for a
good showing this week, and we
probably won't have them later."
The test was to have come to-
morrow on procedure to direct the
five House conferees to insist or
retention of the health care pro-
vision. It would not have been a
direct test of health care senti-
ment in the House, since many
other matters are involved in thr"
omnibus bill.
The next test, if there is one,
may not come until the last week
in September, when the report
of the conference committee comes
before the House. Health care
supporters now plan to seek a
vote to reject the report.
Their problem is that a vote
against the report could be con-
strued as a vote against increased
pensions, for which the House
voted overwhelmingly last July
29. The original House bill con-
tained no health care provision
because the House Ways anc
Means Committee defeated thaf
proposal.

yesterday an historic agreement
on church-state relations express-
ing willingness to continue nego-
tiations on many questions, pre-
sumably including the status of
Joseph Cardinal Mindszenty.
Under the new accord, Pope Pau.
VI announced that he had named
five new Hungarian bishops anc
confirmed a sixth nominated by
Pope John XXIII but never con-
secrated.
Vatican sources said it was the
first direct accord signed betweer
the Holy See and a Communist
government. It represented a ma-
jor development in relations be-
tween the Roman Catholic Churcl
and the Communist world.
As for the fate of the 72-year-
old Cardinal Mindszenty, the ac-
cord obviously was a move toward
his eventualutransfer to Rome
from his refuge in the United
States legation in Budapest.
U.S.-Hungary Relations
In that sense it could con-
tribute to improved relations be-
tween the U.S. and Hungary. The
cardinal has been in the lega-
tion since Soviet tanks crushed
the Hungarian revolution of 1956
The State Department in Wash-
ington welcomed the accord as a
positive s t e p. Administration
sources appeared guardedly opti-
mistic that it might pave the way
for further understanding betweer
the Vatican and Budapest, lead-
ing to an ultimate solution of
the Mindszenty problem.
In Budapest, Joseph Prantner
president of the Hungarian Statc
Church Office, who signed foi
Hungary, said the agreement in-
cludes the Vatican's right to ap-
point prelates subject to Hungar-
ian government consent.
This meant that for the firs
time in 15 years-since the con-

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trial--the Vatican could exercise.
a measure of administrative di-
rection over the church in Hun-
gary.
Prantner said the Hungarian
state "renewed the constitutiona?
safeguard for the free exercise of
religion by Hungarian citizens and
the right of the church to func-
tion freely."
Sources at the Vatican said they
understood the church in Hun-
gary was granted liberty to com-
municate with the Vatican, tr
train priests and religious order

I
By The Associated Press
VIENTIANE-Gen. Sang, chief of psychological warfare for the
neutralist government, showed newsmen yesterday documents which
he said proved that troops from Communist North Viet Nam were
fighting in Laos. He said the papers--mostly letters-were taken from
the bodies of North Vietnamese soldiers.
PHILADELPHIA-Two self-styled leaders of a black supremacist
cult were held yesterday for grand jury action on charges they in-
flamed Negroes to riot in North Philadelphia during the last week of
August.
* * *
SAIGON-Rebel troops headed back by trucks yesterday from their'
militarily lost weekend in Saigon to the war in the Communist-infested
Mekong Delta.
Vietnamese Air Force helicopters flew over the convoy of one unit
to see that it did not change its southward course,
NEW YORK-Stocks closed slightly down yesterday in moderate
trading. Thirty industrials were down 3.70, 20 railroads down .27, 15
utilities down .20 and 65 stocks down .90.

Oath of Allegiance
But Prantner said Catholic
priests still would be required tr
take an oath of allegiance to the
Hungarian regime.
He declared there was an at-
mosphere of good will and that
other outstanding church-state
problems could be settled.
Apparently he was referring tc
Cardinal Mindszenty, but Vatican
officials emphasized that the Car-
dinal's status was still an "oper
question" and that he remained ir
refuge in the U.S. legation.

P 'resid ential Candidates
T'radehVerbal Charges
Republican presidential and vice-presidential candidates Sen.
Barry Goldwater and Rep. William E. Miller attacked the administra-
tion in speeches yesterday. President Lyndon B. Johnson fired back in
a statement to a Miami Beach labor convention.
Shortly before Goldwater began a tour of neighboring Florida
cities, Johnson spent 90 minutes at Cape Kennedy, saying the United
States "cannot be second in space." Johnson then toured the na-
tion's space center, noting that "as long as I am permitted to lead this
nation, I will never accept a second place in this field."
Speaking from St. Petersburg, Goldwater said that pampering of
criminals by the courts must be stopped and that the President should
consider this in making appointments to a "closely divided Supreme
Court."
He said the President was responsible for returning to the states
"those powers necessary for the efficient administration of criminal
law."
Goldwater also attacked the Johnson administration on foreign
policy, morality in government and what he termed Johnson's "lack of
regard for freedom."
Attacking Johnson on his home ground, Miller told an Austin,
Texas, crowd that the President once discriminated against Negroes in
selling some Austin property. Miller contended this showed "hypocrisy"
in Johnson's current stand for civil rights.

Special
Gn00
,..
Fri. & Sat.
0 to 4:30
Mr. Jerry Carmen
will be here with
special samples
of holiday Lanz
so that you will
be able to place
special orders
There'll
be4
Mo1 deling

RECEIVING A DEGREE?
Your Picture belongs in Your Yearbook!
BUT TIME IS RU N N ING OUT!
Pictures are taken only during September.
You must make a sitting appointment
sometime this week if you hope to have
your picture in the 1965 Michiganensian.
MAKE SITTING APPOINTMENTS AT
THE 'ENSIAN BOOTH ON THE DIAG.
SITTING FEE: $2.00
THE 'ENSIAN: $5.00 NOW
(price to go up)

NAGILA DANCE RS
cordially invite you to
attend an
ISRAELI FOLK DANCE SESSION
Sunday, Sept. 20 ..-2:00 P.M.
HILLEL . 1429 Hill
1ON SEPTEMBER 23 & 24, ENTERTAINMENT
HISTORY WILL BE MADE THROUGH THE
MI RACL.E OF RICHARD BURTON'S HAMLET
in ELECTRONOVISION!
You're read about it in the papers-now it's booked
for ANN ARBOR. Richard Burton in Hamleti will
appear in one thousand theatres across the country
simultaneously.
For the first time an entire actual performance
of an outstanding stage hit has been electron-
ically recorded. Through the magic of this new
technique you will in effect be seeing a "live"
Broadway production in the Michigan Theatre.

WITH FULL COMPREHENSION AND RETENTION
You can read 150-200 pages an hour using the ACCELERATED READING method.
You'll learn to read DOWN the page comprehending at speeds of 1,00q to 2,000 words a
minute. And retention is excellent. This is not a skimming method; you definitely read every
"word.
You can apply the ACCELERATED READING method to textbooks and factual material
as well as to literature and fiction. The author's style is not lost when you read at these
speeds. In fact, your accuracy and enjoyment in reading will be increased. Consider what
this reading ability will enable you to accomplish-not only in your required reading but also
in the additional reading you want to do.
No machines, projectors, or apparatus are used in learning the ACCELERATED READING
method. In this way the reader avoids developing any dependence upon external equipment
A Tuesday evening class in ACCELERATED READING will be taught, adjacent to the
University of Michigan campus beginning in mid October, It's an experience to be able to
read a book in one sitting and see it as a whole.
Be our guest at a 30-minute public demonstration of the ACCELERATED READING
method and see it applied.
BRING A BOOK!
Demonstrations will be held at the Michigan Student Union on:
THURSDAY, Sept. 10 at 7:30 P.M.
WEDNESDAY, Sept. 16 at 7:30 P.M.
WEDNESDAY, Sept. 23 at 7:30 P.M.
NATIONAL SCHOOL OF ACCELERATED READING, INC.
151 East 62nd St. New York 21, N.Y.

1

Richard Burton's Hamlet
2 Matinees... One Each Day at 1:30 p.m. Adm.
2 Evenings . . . One Each Night ,at 8 p.m. Adm.
Tickets Now On Sale-No Reserved Seats

$1.50
$2.50

NOW!

SENIORS!

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ATTENTION: STUDENT EMPLOYEES and all students
either employed by the University, by off-campus
business establishments-or presently Unemployed.
STUDENT GOVERNMENT COUNCIL Ad Hoc Commit-
tee on Student Employees' Association is holding a
special assembly FOR YOU to express your opinions
and ideas concerning the proposed establishment of
a University of Michigan Student Employees' Asso-
ciation.
STUDENT EMPLOYEES' ASSOCIATION. The proposed
organization will work for higher wages, better work-
ing conditions, and more jobs.
EVERYONE IS URGED TO ATTEND THIS
IMPORTANT MEETING:

.-,-
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young idea from
Kayser...flapper-flounced
sleep shifts for the
dormitory set
Borrowed from the '20s,
this gay sleepwear with

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,X . is i~lA.,y

a'"1.
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crystal pleating and bumble-
bee"embroidered chiffon
- bows. Luxurious blend
of "a rnel triacetate
and cintron nylon

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 17
7:30 P.M.
MULTIPURPOSE ROOM-UGLI

washes and dries in
no time. Lacquer
red or shell pink
with contrasting trim.
Sizes: P,SM. Short shift
with pantie. 5.95
Shift gown. 5.95

Shown here: a
Lanz softly shaped
all-occasion cotton
in a novelty weave.
Black! Sizes 9-15
$33.00

N ,

"Lanz Circle"

I II

III I

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