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September 13, 1964 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1964-09-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Elliott Cites Flaws in

'Improved Serimma

"The Blue team had .osme
trouble getting going," Elliott said,
but added "the Whites were really
fired up." '
'More Pressure'
Yesterday marked the first time
that the Wolverines have played
an uninterrupted game. "There
was more pressure," Elliott said,
"and it takes time to get used to
it."
The first half success of the'
White aerial game was stifled in
the second half, andElliott said
that rather than being disappoint-
ed with the defensive backfield, he
was pleased with the offensive dis-
play of the White team.
"H ollis and Gabler both did
fine jobs," he said, and with ref-
erence to the pass catchers on the
White, Elliott praised ends Craig
Kirby and Clayte Wilhite.
Kirby, one of Bob Timberlake's
favorite targets last season, nab-
bed passes all afternoon for the

White and was placed on the Blue One of the most exciting plays
squad in the final minutes of the of the day was a spectacular 88-
contest. Wilhite, a rangy 6'4" yard punt runback by junior half-
sophomore, dazzled coaches and back John Rowser. Rowser caught
defenders alike with his quick Stan Kemp's booming 52-yard boos
hands and many receptions, in" on the 12-yard line, zipped up to
cluding the White's only touch- his own 40, slowed down, waiting
down when he made a diving leap I for the interference to form, then
in the end zone to grab a 23-yard ,took off down the sideline for the
Gabler missile. score.

Ward Romps
Sophomore speedster Carl Ward
scored both first half Blue touch-
downs on pass plays from Timber-
lake. On the first, Ward salvaged
a third and goal on the eight
situation by grabbing a flat pass,.
making two fakes and scampering
into the end zone untouched.
The second Ward score came on
a similar play that covered 28
yards. In both instances, Ward
maneuvered his way around two
defenders and zoomed the ad-
ditional yardage for the score.

Trackmen Set Marks
At Olympic Tryouts

Timberlake piloted the Blue of-
fense most of the day, although
sophomore Rick Volk and veteran
senior Frosty Evashevski each had
a couple sets of downs in the
second half. In general, and par-
ticularly in the first half, Elliott
substituted the Blue team in pla-
toons, acclimating his coaching
strategy to fit the 1964 version of
the NCAA substitution ,rule.
Timberlake's effectiveness as a
passer was throttled somewhat in
the first half by rushing linemen
and linebacker Frank Nunley. The
6'4" senior quarterback completed
five of 11 in that half and was
thrown for losses on four different
occasions. Thie' second half was
somewhat a different story for
Timberlake, as he connected six
times for well over 100 yards.
"Bob still needs some more
work," Elliott commented. "The
big thing is getting used to run-
ning the team under pressure."
In addition to Ward, Timber-
lake connected with first team
junior end Steve Smith, sophomore
halfbacks Jim Detwiler and ?Rick
Sygar each twice and last season's
favorite target, John Henderson.
On one play, the elusive senior
flanker grabbed a short flip and
managed to ramp another 14 yards
around three defenders to set ul'
a touchdown.
The second half Blue defense
J~u. ..).___.____buuueIW _t___ proved almost Impen tra .,.as

-Daily-Jim Lines
CAPTAIN JIM CONLEY (82 Blue) wasn't quite tall enough to
stop this completion by junior signal caller Pete Hollis in yes-
terday's scrimmage.

LOS ANGELES {AP)-A near-in-
credible series of broad jumps by
Ralph Boston-including a worldj
record 27'4%1/4"-a record-matching'
:44.9 by 30-year-old Mike Larra-'
bee in the 400 meters}and sprinter
Bob Hayes' comeback highlighted;
yesterday's U.S. Olympic track and
field trials.
Boston, a lanky, 25-year-old
graduate student running for the
Southern California Striders, had.
a fantastic series of jumps; so
good that his world record was
only his second best of the after- 1
noon.
He went 2'10%" on his first
jump, seven inches over the listed
record of 27'3%" by Igor Ter-
Ovanesyan of Russia and the.
longest the world has ever seen.
That jump, however, was aided by
a 5.8 mile per hour wind.
The wind had abated by the
time he got off his record leap
before a crowd of 18,558.
Larrabee, some five to 10 years'
older than most good dash men,
came from behind with about 150
yards to go, collared the front-
running Ulis. Williams, then just
fought off a counter rally by the
lanky ArizonaState student in the
record matching 400.
Williams was timed in 45 flat
while Ollan Cassell, who won the
preliminary trials in New Yolk,
was third in 45.6.
Hayes, the burly flash from
Florida A & M and generally re-

gartled as the world's best sprint-
er, won the 100 meters in 10.1,
finishing about a yard in front of
Trenton Jackson of Illinois, who
was timed in 10.2.
Gerry Lindgren, 18-year-old
Spokane schoolboy, won the 10,-
000 meters in a good 29:02 flat,
running the final 54.7 quarter be-
fore a standing ovation.,
Dallas Long took the shot at
64'9", followed by Randy Matsor
and Parry O'Brien, each with 63'-
" 'ly 'lRir nem~ i-nci

lU '13iens tss acenome~i- 'proved .almost impenetrable, as
ble for his fourth straight Olym- linebacker Tom Cecchini, tackles
pic team. Bill Yearby and Arnie Simkus and
World record holder Fred Han- guards Rich Hahn and John Mar-
sen won the pole vault at 16'6". cum put on the pressure to stymie
winning on fewer misses over John ;he White air game. Halfback Dick
Pennel, who cleared the same Rindfuss picked off two inter-
height. ,. , ' ceptions in the second half.

IF-

10:30 a.i. COMPULSIVE ANGER
Calvin Malefyt, Speaking
7:00 p. . CONSCIENCE AND
MORALS
Professor Kenneth Pike, Ph.D.
Department of Linguistics
university regf rgied church
East Huron by Rackham Auditorium

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