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September 01, 1964 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1964-09-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

e D i e VARSITY REMAINS INTACT:
r EnteringIDifcultiPeriodi

'T BLECH

rd Vidmer, sophomore
ack who was expected to
Timberlake stiff compe-
or the starting quarter-
ot, now must concentrate
the mental phase of foot-
al calling.
'hursday, Vidmer suffered
ries that have forced him
idelined and to concen-
1 mental alertness rather
.ysical perfection.
g to escape onrushing line-
idmer scrambled in the'
d during last Thursday's

practice. With his arm ready to
fire a pass, the Wolverine sopho-
more was hit several times and in
falling caught his cleat in the
ground. The result of the incident'
was a broken tibia near his right
ankle and several torn ligaments
in the ankle.
Leg in Cast
As he now, lies in University
Hospital with a full-length leg
cast, the Pennsylvania high school
star contemplates about the fu-
ture.
"I'm going to study films and
games in order to improve the

CHES OPTIMISTIC:
xperience, New Talent
olster Football Squad

mental part of my game," Vidmer
explains.
By improving his mental foot-
ball alertness and ability, he is
hoping to use these difficult times
to the best possible use.
"A quarterback must do the
right thing at the right time,"
Vidmer went on to say, "and I
intend to work at this until I'm
ready to return to the gridiron."
The 189-pounder from Penn-
sylvania recalls his brilliant foot-
ball background, only to explain
how he became a college quarter-
back.
Starred in High School
Having ben a quarterback since
eighth grade, Vidmer points out
that Bill Abraham who coached
him at Hempfield High School,
Greensburg, Pa., was a great help
to him.
"Coach Abraham greatly helped
me in learning the technique, exe-
cution, and theory of the game
and the Michigan coaches have
gone on from there in aiding me
to polish up my performance."
Under Coach Abraham, Vidmer
first gained wide-spread recogni-
tion in his junior year in high
school. At that time, he made the
all-Foot Hills Conference team and
gained all-state honorable men-
tion. In his senior year, Vidmer
became a high school scholastic

all-American beside being named
to the all-Western Pennsylvania
and all-Pennsylvania state teams.
Guided by All-American
This summer, Vidmer worked at£
Camp Kohut in Oxford, Maine.
There, he worked under the direc-
tion of former Michigan All-t
American Ben Friedman, exercis-r
ing to gain weight and to
strengthen injury-prone muscles.i
By lifting weights, the Wolver-
ine sophomore improved his 1
muscle strength in his neck, lower
back, knees, and ankles.
"I lifted weights, did some iso-
metrics, and ran a lot in order to
better prepare myself for this
season."
Vidmer is not sure how long it
will be before he returns to action.
He will probably be in a cast for
six weeks and then start working
to regain his strength. He, might
be ready for the last few games of
the 1964 season, but it is also
possible that Vidmer will skip the
season and regain &ophomore eli-
gibility next season as others have
done in the past.
Quarterback Bob Chandler asi
a sophomore was injured during
the fall of the 1960 season and1
re-gained eligibility. Also Frosty
Evashevski hurt his knee as a
sophomore in 1961 and was grant-
ed another year of eligibility.

By TOM WEINBERG "We've got four freshmen who
should help us," Strack said.
"I guess we're a little bit spoil-
ed." Three of the four that the
So says Michigan basketball coach mentioned are from Michi-
coach Dave Strack referring to gan while the fourth, John Gee,
the prospects for this year's fresh- is a standout high school per-
men team. former from Cortland, N.Y.

0 LI aU18A, L:j4A4II11ll

"We've had three pretty good
years of recruiting in a row," he
said, "and while we don't have a
Russell, we've got some ball play-
Freshman Football
An organizational meeting
for freshmen football candi-
dates will be held today, at 3:30
p.m., in the basement of the
Athletic Office Building, 1000
S. State St. All freshman in-
terested in football are urged
to attend.
ers.
After reviewing the freshmen,
Strack went on to say that all the
players from last year's Big Ten
championship team were back and
in good shape.
"The sophomores should be a
big addition to the club. The only
player who's not back is Leon Har-
ris," he said referring to the 6'7"
younger brother of former Wol-
verine John Harris.

Gee at 6'7%" is the tallest of
the four freshmen Strack singled
out. The others are Jim Pitts (no
relation to the Northwestern cen-
ter) 6'3", Mark Fritz, 6'41", and
Tom Bowman 6'41/2",
Direct Legacy.
Gee is well grounded in the
Michigan athletic tradition as his
father was the first big man to
ever play basketball for the Wol-
verines in 1935-37. Gee also was

a three-year letterwinner in base-
ball and won the conference medal
of honor in 1937.
Strack was quick to praise the
freshman, saying "he could de-'
velop into quite a ball player."
Pitts, confusingly enough, play-
ed his high school ball at Detroit
Northwestern high school, where
he was named to the all-city
squad and mentioned for all-state
honors.
Fritz is from Birmingham and
is highly touted by Strack and the
freshman coach Tom Jorgensen..
Baseball, Too
Bowman is the fourth freshman
whom the coach mentioned, and
although he is primarily a base-

Strack was quick to point out
that any judgment on the fresh-
men at this stage is premature
and stressed that any freshman
with basketball experience should
not be afraid to try out. "We
certainly have some good talent
now," he said, "but we encourage
everyone to come out."
Citing junior forward Dan
Brown as an example, the coach
said that everyone would have a
chance. "Dan came here un-
hearlded," he said, "and now he
has a chance of playing for us this
year."

es Frosh Cage Prospects

By JIM LaSOVAGE
i the beginning of clas
the end of double pract
r the Wolverine grid squ
the coaching staff t
the time when the job
i a precision football m
ecomes the most importa
before the start of a fr
fall head coach BumpI
id his staff have 22 lett
'eturning from last ye
who lettered two years a
out five dozen other asp
.ng' athletes with which
this machine. With only
of drilling before the fi
1 Saturday, there Is an o
c feeling on the practi

"Generally," said Elliott yester-
day, looking at the previous week's
ses i progress, "we're to the point where
ice we should start to improve some.
ad. The first week is mainly condi-
his tioning, and progress is pretty
of slow. But we had a pretty good
na- week last week." He added that
ant no position shifts were made dur-
esh ing the week.
The head mentor also seemed
El- pleased with the action of his boys
er- in last Saturday's scrimmage. "I
ar, thought the hitting was real good
go, and the intensity too," Elliott com-
ir- mented. "And there was some
to good running." He noted that the
a speed in the backfield is better
rst than at this time last year.
>- Scrimmages Held
ice Scrimmages are generally held
each Saturday, although one may
* be called on any day during regu-
lar practice.
Coach Elliott mentioned that
there have been few serious in-
juries this fall. Dick Vidmer has
been put out of action with a
broken ankle. Quarterback Bob
Timberlake has what Elliott term-
ed "an agitation in his ankle,"
but he worked out with the rest
of the squad with a taped-up
ankle. Ken Wright, a sophomore
center, has an ailing knee, but it
*is not yet known whether or not
it is serious. Rick Sygar, who
broke his leg twice in the last year,
is improving steadily ?as his leg
grows stronger, according to
Elliott.
During the remaining days of
the preseason training, Elliott said
he will be testing to see if Mich-
igan can profit by the two-pla-
toon system. "We're going to try,
or investigate, the possible offen-
sive andi defensive units," he ex-
plained. The object will be to dis-
coverwhich players will play well
on either the offensive or defensive
unit, or both.

4"

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AN OPEN LETTER TO TIHE VOTERS
I resigned from the Board of the League of Women Voters of Ann Arbor this past February in order
to become politically active. It seemed to me that my Republican Party was straying from the "mainstream
of its philosophy, that enunciated by Lincoln and embodied in the platforms of both 1854 and 1960. Po-
litical history relates that this is not a unique occurrence, but our political parties have returned to course
because people who cared remained with them and worked to lead them back. I believe in a vigorous two-
party system of government. A cleavage of our parties along liberal-conservative lines is wrong. Wrong be-
cause liberalism and conservatism are methods of approaching problems rather than points of view, and
wrong becauses such a split would mean the necessity of deciding on liberal and conservative stands on
most major issues. If one party took a stand that was wrong for the country, on a major issue, that would
be the end of that party because there would.not be within it the coalition of views that could lead to a
reformation of opinion. That would leave us with a one party system, and my knowledge of history sug-
gests a one-party system is the quickest way to tyrrany.
I BELIEVE IN AND SUPPORT THE IDEAS AND PRINCIPLES OF THE MODERATE REPUBLICANS,
AND I DO NOT BELIEVE IN TEMPORIZING WITH THE FORCES OF REACTION. IF ELECTED, I
PROMISE TO WORK FOR:
FISCAL REFORM: An adequate, equitable and flexible tax structure with coordination of local-state
relationships, to distribute the tax burden fairly and attract new industries to Michigan, as detailed in
Govenor Romney's full program'of fiscal reform. This would include elimination of sales tax on food and
drugs, removal of the business activities tax, and institution of a personal income tax:
CIVIL RIGHTS: Provision of adequate funds for the Civil Rights Commission so that it may carry out the
full power in its sphere of authority to protect civil rights in employment, education, housing and public
accommodation.
GOVERNMENT REORGANIZATION: Full implementation of the new Constitution including the passage
of enabling legislation for County Home Rule and reorganization of the executive branch of government.
EDUCATION: Expansion of higher edudcation, particularly community colleges and vocational training
facilities. Recognition through adequate appropriations of the contribution made to the state by the unique
quality of education which the UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN provides. A strong and vigorous University
is important to the economic future of Michigan both because it provides the professional personnel for
these industries and the teachers for our expanding institutions of higher learning.
CONSERVATION OF OUR NATURAL RESOURCES: Rapid enactment of a comprehensive plan for land
and water conservation so we may compete for federal funds under the recently passed Land and Water
Conservation Bill. The groundwork for an excellent plan has been done under the direction of Governor
Romry, and its enactment will mean more parks, recreation areas and wilderness areas for.Michigan.
INDIVIDUAL DEVELOPMENT: Pilot studies have shown that children from culturally deprived homes
benefit enormously from intensive training before entering kindergarten. Passage of a bill allowing school
districts to set up preschool classes would permit aiding these children when aid can be of greatest value.
We must .increase the number and size of our state scholarships and loans to students seeking higher
education. These policies should reduce the dropout problem, diminish, juvenile delinquency, lessen the
future welfare burden and enlarge the opportunity of all our citizens for the development of their full
potential.
I BELIEVE THE RESULTS OF THE APRIL ELECTION SHOWED THAT THE PEOPLE OF THIS
AREA WANT REPRSENTATIVES WHO TAKE POSITIVE STANDS FOR PROGRESSIVE LEGISLATION. I
APPEAL TO THOSE WHO SHARE THE VISION OF THE FUTURE TO ALLOW ME TO WORK AS STATE
REPRESENTATIVE FROM THE 53rd DISTRICT FOR FISCAL REFORM TO CREATE THE BEST POSSIBLE
FRAMEWORK FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF LAND, WATER, AND HUMAN RESOURCES IN MICHIGAN.
CaroynRPana eewTE
aJ IOG~RAPHICAL NOTES

I

'I

/

CAROYN ANALEWIS

wMWE 19!

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