100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

August 28, 1964 - Image 14

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1964-08-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


AN W

Asti

SGC Votes Against Co-Op

HEADQUARTERS

FOR ALL

TEXTB

NEW AND USED

FOR ALL

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIG

AN
3
662- 5669

__ __ _ - -_ __ _ _ __ _ __---- - 1

By DAVID BLOCK
A student cooperative organiza-
tion failed this, summer in its at-
tempt to achieve official recogni-
tion by Student Government
Council.:
The Students for Cooperative
Enterprise, founded primarily to
promote a year-old cooperative
bookstore on State St., sought
quick recognition by SGC and in
order to take advantage of the
publicity opportunities offered to

student organizations during reg-
istration week.
i TheCouncil vote, taken by a
postcard ballot, was eight in favor
of recognition, eight opposed and
one abstention. However, two of
the affirmative votes were contin-
gent upon the organization adopt-
ing financial procedures outlined
by the auditor of student organi-
zations.
In the event that SGC approves
the group in the near future it
is unlikely that the Office of Stu-
dent Affairs, which can veto Coun-

2/Le

JOnoW!

cil actions, would allow recognition
to stand.
The Regents' official policy on
this matter is that the University
shall not "encourage or approve
the establishment of cooperative
mercantile organizations." Vice-
President for Student Affairs
James A. Lewis felt recognition
of the group would violate this
policy.%
Council member Eugene Won,
'65, said it was "idle fancy" to
hope that the University would
grant recognition.

Voice Political Party intends to
expand the domain of its func-
tions this coming year.
Started as ,ca mpus-based stu-
dent political party in 1960, Voice
became the local chapter of Stu-
dents for a Democratic Society inj
1962. Now it seeks to become a
"broad-based, multi-issueorgani-
zation," Carol McEldowney, a
member of the Voice executive
committee, said recently.
For the next semester, Voice
intends to operate in these areas:
-Community organizing. Voice
hopes to study and take action
against problems of unemploy-
ment, inadequate housing and poor:
municipal services in local commu-
nities like Ann Arbor.
--Education, Voice will continue
its seminars and expand them.
Believing that some classroom
experiences should be relevant to
problems in society,,Voice will also
seek to create courses dealing di-
rectly with these problems.,
One means of acquainting stu-
dents with problems in society isl

t h r o u g h dormitory discussion
groups which it would set up.
Voice is also, considering a
course-evaluation booklet to be
used as information and to bring
about change.
-Campus action. Voice will
continue to sponsor speakers and
through S t u d e n t Government
Council to spread information and
initiate action of specific campus
problems, such as a student em-
ployes' union, better student
housing or discrimination within
the University.
At present Voice has not decid-
ed if it will run candidates for
SGC election in the fall.
It is, however, considering a pro-
gram Which would attempt to con-
cern all students ,with the need,
desirability and implications of
the present draft system.
Another possible program would
consider post-college plans, espe-
cially for students who do not
want to enter a profession which
is devoid of any political orien-
tation.

'BROAD-BASED'
Voice Expands Plat
For Coming Year

COURSES

:.'i

EVERYTHING THE STUDENT NEEDS
BUY NOW AND AVOID THE FALL RUSH

IT'S A GROWING TOWN IN A CHANGI NG WORLD!1
BE REASSURED - deal with a nationally known, long established record
shop
FIND AMPLE HELP and guidance in choosing from an evergrowing selec-
tion of record entertainment.
ENJOY SHOPPING where music and artists on records retain their high
intrinsic value.
BE REASSURED in knowing that the pricing is competitive.
FIND A BROAD SELECTION of the best in recorded music.
SO JOIN YOUR FRIENDS - Shop where music on records is our pleasure,
as well as our business.

Citizens To Decide Fate of
Ann Arbor 'Dry Island'

N.-'

UNIVERSITY BOOKSTORE

SERVING ANN ARBOR AND WASHTENAW COUNTY SINCE 188

i ~Si)

On Nov. 3 Ann Arbor citizens
will be given the chance to decide
whether or not to sharply reduce
the area of the city's traditional
"dry island."
An Ann Arbor citizens' group,
the Committee: for Fair Licensing,
has collected some 1800 signatures
petitioning to have the dry lined
issue set before the voters. ThisI
is 400 signatures more than nec-j
essary to initiate a referendum.
Presently, the city's dry island
includes all of Ann Arbor east of
a line running along Division St.,
Packard St. and the Huron River.
The proposed island would be
only about one-seventh this size. It

would be bounded on the north
by Ahn St. and North Vniversity,
and on the south by Granger St.
Division St. would remain the
eastern boundary, with State and
Forest defining the area on the
west.
These boundaries would legalize
I liquor by the glass at such places
as the Hill, Oxford Housing, the
Women\'s League, Hill Aud. and a
sizable portion of the Universi-
ty's fraternities and sororities.
City laws and University regu-
lations forbidding the sale of li-
quor to persons under 21 would
stil' hold, even in the proposed
"wet" areas.

316 S. State

Convenient Parking Maynard Street Carport I/i Block From Our Store

NO 2-0675

417 East Liberty

HOME OF U. OF M MUSiC

___________ III -- -------..~-'. '.--..~. ________

A

i

'-Sm-
l~N-.
00010-

IF THE VOTERS of
Ann Arbor agree,
this will be the new
"dry island" - the
area in which liquor-
by-the-glass is ban-
ned - after Nov. 3.
The current "dry"
area includes all the
territory on this map
to the right of a line
running down Divi-'
sion to Packard, then
on southward on
Packard.

' .

B

C.

7/e1come to

i
' (, ':
F ~
'
' J
, "
''

All Name Brand
YARNS
Rug Making and
Needlepoint
Instruction Books,
o
Pn, ,++- c tc

V r VF 17)

-,. i

THE STORE WITH

"4'.'

EVERYTHING FROM
BEAUTIFUL BASICS'TO
OFF-BEAT FANTASIES

For all your knitting needs,
stop in and see us-
AT THE
YARNCRAFT SHOP
Located in the Arcade
11 Nickels Arcade-Between Maynard & State

P5

co ce.

A

America's most complete campus apparel shop, ready to'clue you in on
the do's and don't, the pros and protocol of college fashion life. Jacob-
son's is the store that's famous for fashion-favorite names . . . makers
you've come to know and depend upon as national symbols of quality
and good taste . . . names you knew at home---waiting for you at
Jacobson's, your away-from-home headquarters for college-right fash-
ions from head to foot.
Plan now to make Jacobson's your first campus stop.. . see all the

TO ALL OF YOU NEW
MICHIGAN STUDENTS

Please make,

yourself

v

at home in the two
JOHN LEIDY
Shops-and, good luck

to Ann Arbor

i~F?'~i

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan