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August 28, 1964 - Image 12

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The Michigan Daily, 1964-08-28

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I-

PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

. 1
A.

FRIDAY, AUC UST '2$ 1964

PAGE TWO THE MICHIGAN DAILY FRIDAY. ATJGTJST 28. 19C4 I

._s. ,.., .s .,,.,., .,, , .,..

,.

'U' Employe Union Expands Membership

FIRED EDITOR:
Student Press Censures Varner's Actions

I1

By ROBERT HIPPLER
A University employe union next
week plans to move into the sec-
ond stage of 'its current organiz-
ing drive.
University Local 1583 (AFL--
CIO), a union limited to non-
teaching and noi-management
employes, .,has tentatively slated
a Thursday meeting in Angell
Hall to explain further its pro-
gram to those interested. It held
a- similar meeting July 24, when
it started a drive to organize a
majority of the University's 4700
eligible employes.
Next week's meeting will stress
organizing methods and reasons
for organizing, Ben Moore, a un-
ion staff representative, said yes-
terday. Union representatives will
pass out literature during the week
at several plant entrances and at
University Hospital.
Since the meeting last month
the union, concentrating on cir-
culating its literature and signing

new members, has hiked its mem-
bership from 400 to more than
500. Its membership goal is about
2500, or a majority of those elig-
ible. If it thinks it has a majority,
the union will ask the State Me-
diation Board through the Uni-
versity for a representation elec-
tion-
The board has already granted-
such an election to a similar un-
ion at Michigan Technological;
University, so it almost certainly
would -grant it to the University
union.
If local 1583 won a majority in
the election, the University would
ask state Atty. Gen. Frank Kelley
whether the local, as a publicly-
employed union, could bargain for
a contract with its public em-
ployer. State law is vague on this
point. Michigan Tech has asked
Kelley for a similar opinion and is
awaiting his answer.
Other states have granted such
privileges to publicly-employed
unions: At two other Big Ten

universities-Minnesota and Wis-
consin-employe unions have won
contracts from the universities.
Local 1583 has been on campus
for four years, but never started
an intensive organizing drive un-
til last rmonth. It is affiliated with
the American Federation of State,
County and Municipal Employes in
addition to the. AFL-CIO.
Since its drive has started, there
has been talk that it might merge
with the only other University em-
ployes union on campus, the Build-]
ing Service International Union,
organized in 1951. There is con-
siderable employe sentiment in
both unions for a merger,.
Leaders of local 1583 have in-
dicated that he two unions dis-
cussed a merger last year, but
that talks had "broken off after
several months with nod results.
"However, considering the senti-
ment in favor of the merger, they
said their union will make at-
tempts to contact the service un-
ion "as soon as possible."

The local 1583 office at 400 E.
Liberty will be open until 9 p.m.
next week to sign new members
and talk to those interested.
Publicly - employed unions in
Michigan are prohibited under
state law from striking against
their public employer. But one
leader indicated at the meeting
that this does not necessarily
weaken the bargaining position of
such a union. He and Moore em-
phasized that strikes are in any
case only a "last resort."
They, 5pointed out that it is also.
against the law for publicly-em-
ployed unions to strike in New
York state, but that despite this,
New York unions have obtained
numerous concessions from their
public employers.
Some attending one meeting
were critical of a "University
policy of divide and conquer," as
one commented. He claimed that
"the University tries to keep its
employes from organizing in any
way."

DURWARD B. VARNER

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(Continued from Page 1)
ed off the whole controversy--was
"probably invalid."
The survey, circulated by Metz-
ger in Oakland dormitories last
spring, attempted to determine the
effect of living in dormitories up-
on the sexual activities of stu-
dents at the Michigan State Uni-
versity branch. It asked questions
concerning the frequency and in-
timacy of sexual,. relations stu-
dents had had before and after
moving into the dorms.
Upon receiving complaints about
the nature of the survey, Varner
called Metzger, in and insisted
that the survey's results, as yet
untabulated, not be printed in the
Observer
Metzger asked Varner what
would happen if the survey were
published; Varner replied that in
that case Metzger would be sus-
pended from the university. It was
this move that USSPA condemned
as a "threat to suspend Metzger,
Figures Show
Humani ties- Are
Puling Ahead
This may be the age of science,
but at the University graduate,
studies in many humanistic fields
are growing even faster than those'
in the sciences.
For example, the average en-
rollment figures in various areas
of graduate studies during 1959-
63, when compared with those for
the 1954-58 period, show these in-
creases:
Languages and literatures by
53.5 per cent, engineering sciences,
48.1 per cent, arts and related
areas, 46.3 per cent, health science,
28.7 per cent, physical science,
23.4 per cent, biological sciences,
16.7 per cent and social sciences,
except education, 16.6 per cent.
Education decreased by 1 per cent.
Of the 6,593 graduate students
last fall, 1,509 studied arts and
related areas and languages and
literatures, while 1,345 took physi-
cal, biological and health sciences.
Social sciences (including edu-
cation), the largest of the seven
broad divisions of graduate studies
for many years, had an enrollment
of 2,492, and engineering sciences
drew 1,096 students last fall.
The graduate school now awards
more degrees annually than any
other school or college of the
University. "This fact is note-
worthy, for it reveals in simple
arithmetic what we all have ob-
served in the last decade or so:
graduate education has become.
more wanted and more needed
than ever before," Dean Ralph A.
Sawyer of the graduate school,
says.

the student, for actions as Metz-
ger, the editor."
Metzger then agreed not to print
the survey. But re went back to
the Observer and wrote a news
article describing Varner's actions
and his threat of suspension. The
article referred, in general terms,
to the sex survey.
When he learned of this article's
forthcoming publication, Varner
.ordered the printer to destroy the
edition of the paper which was to
include it.
Admitting this , article was .ac-
curate, Varner defended his de-
struction of the issue on the
grounds that the article's descrip-
tion of tre sex survey violated the
"spirit of Metzger's agreement
not to publish the survey. USSPA
did not accept this argument and
censured Varner for "his con-
fiscation of an accurate newspaper
story before it could be printed."
In addition to destroying the
issue, Varner at this ,point sent
Metzger the following order:
"Effective today, you are re-
lived of any association with the
Oakland Observer, and you are
not to be a r art of any publica-
tion on this campus while you are
a student here."
This action drew the remaining
two of USSPA's four rebukes. The
dismissal of Metzger "for attempt-
ing to print an objective, factual
record of Varner's actions" was
censured, as was his expulsion
"without due process" from all'
publications.
The case wad investigated for
USSPA by former Daily National
Concerns Editor Philip Sutin, '64,
whose 38-page report served as
the basis for USSPA's action. In
probing the case, Sutin took the
sex questionnaire to Prof. Charles
F. Channell of the Survey Re-
search Center, an expert in jour-
nalistic surveys.
It was largely on the basis of
Prof. Cannell's conclusion that the
survey "isn't worth a damn" that
USSPA concluded that the survey
was "probably invalid."
Sutin's report also concluded
that a major difficulty in the
Oakland case was that the Ob-
server's relationship to Varner
and the university was vague and
undefined. To rectify this problem,'
USSPA included these suggestions
in its resolution:
"USSPA urges that the eight-
member student-faculty commit-
tee studying the future of the Ob-
server:
"-Define a clear line of respon-
sibility in the operations of the
newspaper, and
"-Incorporate the USSPA Code
of Ethics in any document defin-
ing the relationship of ,the Ob-
server to the Oakland administra-
tion.
"USSPA stand ready to offer
any assistance aimed at maintain-
ing a free and responsible press
at Oakland."

CENTREX;
Transition to
New System
Made Calnily
(Continued from Page 1)
the smooth transition as the re-
sult of a Michigan Bell Telephone
Co. information campaign. The
company, which planned and in-
stalled the phone system during
the past year at a $2.5 million
cost, conducted lectures and dis-
tributed brochures detailing Cen-
trex.
Dialing Outside
Mrs. Schlecht said that a major
problem is the confusion about
procedures for dialing outside
Centrex. The caller is supposed to
dial ''9" before dialing a full
seven-digit number. However, the
dial tone remains unchanged after
the caller dials nine, hence he does
not know that the circuits are
ready for any local or long-
distance call outside Centrex, she
said.
1 The Centrex installations being
completed within the next month
,will include all phones on Central
Campus, the Medical Center,
North Campus and the residence
halls.
Users who are still confused
should remember these simple
rules:
-Callers from phones outside
the Centrex system have to dial
seven numbers, starting with 764.
-From one University phone to
an6ther, callers only have to dial
five numbers: they can omit the
"76."
S-To reach a phone outside the
University, inside callers must
first dial "9" to get out of the
Centrex switchboard.

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