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August 28, 1964 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1964-08-28

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ST 28, 1964__T4E MICHIGAN DAILY
NUAL CONGRESS: ilar visit of Cuban students to th
United States.
e "Also in the international area
iSA Delegates Act on Basic Policy Declarations S=ntreorganizedfInter
national Student Conference. IS(
~#Aiglon J ant Zen

(Continued from Page 1)
sloppy writing and generalizations
in the bill.
More BPDs
Other second-year BPDs: 1
-A BDP outlining the principles
of academic freedom was passed
unanimously. The legislation said
universities "must serve as an
open forum for different views and
opinions, no matter how unpopu-
lar or divergent."
It further claimed that Ameri-
can college students have the in-
tellectual ability to recognize and
analyze various and diverse
theories and rejected any limita-
tions upon opportunities for hear-
ing such theories.
-The role of student govern-
ment legislation passed by last
year's congress was brought up to
date with only minor changes.
-A wide-ranging student bill of
rights and responsibilities again
was passed by the Congress to
stand as NSA's position regarding
the student's place in the univer-
sity.
The two-part declaration out-
lined the areas in which students
have definite rights and declared
the responsibilities inherent in the
role of student.
Student Welfare'
-Minor changes were made to
the student welfare BPD. The
legislation calls for efforts in im-
proving the condition of students
in areas of housing, physical
exercise, job opportunities and the
cost of travel..
-A controversial BPD in the
field of national security and civil
liberties was passed after much
discussion. The bill noted a ten-
dency of many Americans "to be-
come fearful of subversive influ-
ence at home and abroad."
The Congress affirmed that
where civil liberties and national
security may come in conflict, per-
sonal liberty should be of para-
mount importance.
-The Congress turned down a
substitute resolution for a bill on
student participation in academic
policy formation which is already
contained in the codification.
The substitute said some ad-
ministrations have become "ar-
biters' of academic conflicts serv-
ing as the final and often sole
decision-making body of the in-

stitubion." It was defeated, 137-
131.
Opponents of the substitute ar-
gued that it alienated "the very
people we are trying to influence."
ISC Cooperation
-Cooperation with internation-
al student unions was approved in
a BPD which praised the Inter-
national Student Conference and
bilateral contacts as methods for
providing student solidarity.
-A BPD was passed calling for
'continuing cooperation among all
members of the educational com-
munity and for the development of
independent thought."
The legislation noted the dif.
ferent roles of the student, faculty
and administration and urged that
students be given a more respon-
sible part in affecting matters
that concern them.
-The last BPD asked that the
student press be completely self-
directed within the legal restric-
tions of libel, etc. "Suppression of
the newspaper is no solution to
the problem of irresponsibility,"
the legislation said.
The Congress approved the bill
which called for NSA to request
that each university guarantee to
its newspaper the final authority
of its student staff on all ques-
tions of policy.
Program Mandates
A program mandate aimed at
discrimination in campus frater-
nal organizations calls for the
National Affairs Vice President
(NAVP) to conduct a wide-rang-
ing survey of any discriminatory
clauses. It asks the establishment
of a system whereby national and
local groups eventually may lose
recognition.
The mandate section says the
NAVP should notify member
schools that they should help lo-
cals in seeking waivers of such
clauses. Also specified were pro-
visions, for two "review dates."
After the second date, the man-
date says, "recognition should be
withdrawn from those chapters
which are affiliated with national
organizations which have dis-
criminatory clauses."
Health
The congress passed unanimous-
ly a program mandate which took
note of inadequate facilities at

many universities
ment of mental
health problems.

for the treat- to seek development of projects
and physical designed for migrant workers.

The mandate called for an in-
vestigation of health services at
member schools, a compilation of
the data acquired, the establish-
ment of a national confprence on
student mental health problems, a
seminar at the next Congress, and
the extension of an existing pro-
gram which is dealing with the
problems.
The issue of birth control was
brought up in a program mandate
which would encourage members

An amendment was tacked on
calling for birth control informa-
tion to be made available to the
workers if they requested it and if
the provision of such information
did not conflict with existing laws.
The two "if" clauses were of-
fered as substitutes after two pre-
vious amendments failed.
Also included in the mandate
were suggestions for programs in
adult education, day care centers,
health and sanitation and politi-
cal orientation.

The conservative coalition
fought unsuccessfully to remove an
amendment which called for stu-
dents to work for the formation of
labor unions for the migrant work-
ers.
Cuba Travel'
USNSA jumped into the hot
issue of travel in Cuba as the Con-
gress approvel a bill which man-
dates the International Commis-
sion to:
-Try to arrange with the State
Department special permission for
a student tour of Cuba.
-Explore possibilities for a sim-

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