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August 28, 1964 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1964-08-28

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PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN' DAILY

FRIDAY, :AUGUST 28. 1964

PAGE SIX THE MICHIGAN DAILY FRIDAY. AT1C.T1~T 2R 1 QE~4

101 'aV1LLA11 -,)%_AV" 1 NU, AIU7

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STARTS
TODAY

Shows at
e 1,3,r5, 7r
and 9:10 P.M.

Faculty Firings Stir Heated Debate

I

Did
you
read
the
ad.
on
the
last,
page

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THEY'RE IN LOVE THREE TIMES AND THREE WAYS IN ONE MOVIEI
JOSEPH E. .EVINE
presenas
IIIVITTORIOt
AND
in COLOR
Produced by Screenplay by ALBERTO MORAVIA.
Af(ff CESARE ZAVATTINI
CNi 1 EDUARDO De FILIPPO
ClACHAMPION-CONCORDIA FILM
AN EMBASSY PICTURES RELEASE
Weekday Matinees 75c Eves. & Sunday $1.00

The teachers were supported by matics department.
the University Senate, the fac- These two, along with Prof.
ulty's official voice, and later by Clement Markert of the zoology
the American Association of Uni- May, 1954, when HUAC opened
versity Professors, as well as by hay, in Uig Thend
numerous individuals. hearings in Lansing. They noti-
nfied University and departmental
Their cases became the focal officials, immediately upon re-
point for much of the campus re- ceiving their subpoenas, that they
action to the tensions which the would appear in the state capital.
Congressional investigations had In Lansing, on May 10, the
generated. And in the four or five three refused to cooperate with
months between the teachers' ap- HUAC's questioners. Within hours,
pearances before' HUAC and the Hatcher suspended them from
end of the most intense reaction their teaching duties.
to their dismissals, much was re- 'Violated Free Speech'
vealed about the thinking of many Professors Nickerson and Mar-
members of the University com- kert had invoked the Fifth
ksmunity.,Amendment to the Constitution,
h ikereoDavteRe which protects an individual from
j The two fired by the Regents having to incriminate himself, as
upon Hatcher's recommendation their grounds for refusing to an-
were Prof. Mark Nickerson of the swer querstions. Davis used only
Medical School and H. Chandler the First Amendment, asserting

(Continued from Page 1)

Davis, instructor in

Imom"

- pg

that the "committee's questions was taken for the purpose of pub-,
constituted a violation of freedom lic relations."
of speech, press and assembly." Diag Debates
It was incumbent upon the ad- At the same time, numerous pe-
ministration at this point to in- titidns circulated on campus, some
vestigate their cases and decide of them among departmental col-
whether the men should be rec- leagues and students of the three
ommended for reinstatement or faculty men. One group gathered
for dismissal over 1000 si nar d i a d

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CHAR-BROI LED
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Hatcher explained in a letter to
the three that "your refusal to
answer the questions directed to
you by a duly authorized com-
mittee of the Congress . . . seek-
ing to establish the facts about
Communist activities in this na-
tion raisers serious questions as to
your relationship to the Univer-
sity and to your colleagues, and
places upon you the duty to go
forward to explain your actions."
'Without Prejudice'
The letter stated that the sus
pensions were "without prejudice
to the final decision in their
cases."
Hatcher had indicated in pre-
vious statements and in a tele-
gram to HUAC chairman Rep.
Harold Velde (R-Ili) that the
University would "cooperate with
HUAC's investigation to the fullest
extent."
Despite the disclaimer of no
prejudice, however, Hatcher's ac-
tion drew immediate criticism. An
editorial in The Daily argued that
"there is no such thing as suspen-
sion without prejudice. The sus-
pension necessarily carries with
it the idea of suspicion until clear-
ed.
"We can draw only one conclu-
sion . . . The suspension action
DAC Picketers
To Stand Trial
September 3
Following repeated requests by
the defense, Circuit Judge James
R. Breakey Jr. Wednesday granted
j an extension of the pre-trial date
of seven members of the Direct
Action Committee (DAC) charged
with obstructing an officer in his
efforts to maintain the peace.
Breakey set Sept. 3 as the date
and requested that all members
of the defense be present.
The ,extension was granted in
order that Eddie D. Smith, de-
fense attorney for the DAC mem-
bers, may obtain transcripts of
previous proceedings of this type
from the Michigan Supreme Court.
The case involving the seven
pickets has been pending since
Feb. 28. The DAC members were
arrested on that date after vio-
lence broke out on a civil rights
picket line at City Hall.
The defendants involved are
David Barnard, Delmar Jackson,
Larry Collins, Richard Hutchin-
son, Judy Weissman, Phyllis Er-
furt and Martha Mason.

I Vui1VV bgli~ es urng ay-
long debates on the Diag.
Many of the petitions, stressing
academic freedom, and statements
attested to the teaching compe-
tence of the three professors and
noted that at no time had the
men injected their political beliefs
into the classroom.
Over 200 faculty members sign-
ed an advertisement declaring that
"competence should be the criter-
ion for.. . evaluating'faculty per-
sonnel" and that "personal be-
liefs, unless they are demonstrated
to interfere with a man's ability
to study and teach objectively,
should not enter the evaluation.
"We do not feel that the in-!
vocation of a right guaranteed
every citizen by the Constitution is
ground for firing."
Procedures Begun
As soon as the suspensions were
announced, complex and carefully
planned procedures for dealing1
with such cases went into opera-
tion. The procedures had been es-
tablished upon recommendations
from the faculty Senate, with
Hatcher's concurrence, several
months before when the HUAC
announced its plans for an inves-
tigation.
The executive board of the lit-
erary college began closed-door
questioning of Prof. Markert and
Davis immediately, and the Medi-
cal School executive board follow-
ed shortly by launching its in-
vestigation of the Nickerson case.
These groups were instructed tc
recommend dismnissal or reinstate-
ment after speaking to the sus-
pended professors about their
Communist experiences and rea-
sons for not testifying before
HUAC.
Soon after both executive com-1
' mittees had reported to Hatcher.
the president asked a special ad-
visory committee of the faculty
Senate to make its own investiga-
tion of all three men. He explain-
ed at the time that since the sus-
pension cases involved the whole
University, they should be inves-
tigated at that level. Hatcher ask-
ed the Senate in May of 1954 to
name this five-man committee.
Recommend Action
The University-wide committee's
job was to retrace the steps of
the Medical School and literary
college investigators, evaluate the
facts and advise Hatcher on what
action to take. It began its hear-
ings in the summer of 1954.
Hatcher appeared before the
committee prior to its investiga-
tions. He made note of the princi-
ples laid down in a statement by
the American Association of Uni-

versities. The statement, which
had received endorsement of the
Senate Advisory Committee on
University Affairs, the Senate's ex-
ecutive body, made the following
points:
"As in all acts of association, the
professor a c c e p t s conventions
which become' morally binding.
Above all, he owes his colleagues
in the university complete candor
and perfect integrity, precluding
any kind of clandestine or con-
spiratorial activities.
Duty To Speak Out
"He owes equal candor to thr
public. If he is called upon to an-
swer for his convictions, it is his
duty as a citizen to speak out. It
is even more definitely his duty
as a professor.
"Refusal to do so, on whatever
legal grounds, cannot fail to re-
flect upon a profession that claims
for itself the fullest freedom to
"Competence should be
the criterion for . evaluat-
ing faculty personnel...
Personal beliefs, unless they
are demonstrated to inter-
fere with a man's ability to
study and teach objectively,
should not enter the evalua-
tion.
"We do not feel that the
invocation of a right guar-
anteed every citizen by the
Constitution is ground for
firing."
-200 faculty members
after the suspensions
speak and the maximum protec-
tion of that freedom available in
our society....
"Appointment to a university
position and retention after ap-
pointment require not only pro-
fessional competence but involve
the affirmative obligation of be-
ing diligent and loyal in citizen-
ship.
"Above all, a scholar must have
integrity and independence. This
renders impossible adherence to
such a regime as that of Russia.
No person who accepts or advo-
cates such principles and methods
has any place in a university. Since
present membership in the Com-
munist Party requires the accept-
ance of these principles and meth-
ods, such membership extinguishes
the right to a university position."
No Action on Students
In the meantime, the Univer-
sity decided not to take any dis-
ciplinary action against two grad-
uate students who had also been
called to Lansing.
The University had adopted a
more lenient set of criteria for
dealing with students called to
testify on Communist activities
than for faculty members. To
many, it seemed at the time that

I

4
'I

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at

Ann Arbor's Friendly Book Store

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549 East University-Across from Engineering Arch

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Well .. . at the
corner of State
and Liberty is this
women's store ...
see, there's going
to be this band,
modeling and

I

i

.a...

UNIVERSITY LECTURE SERIES
FIRST SEMESTER
1964-65
"Challenges to Religious Faith in a Century of Revolution"

--li

cOME

(0)

C uaC I

ON

lthEp

*Aea3rATHl

refreshments at
this open house, see.
Well, fellows are
more than welcome,
in fact, we'd love
them to come.
Yep!
Collins

ST. ANDREW'S CHURCH and
the EPISCOPAL STUDENT
FOUNDATION

SUNDAY
8:00 a.m.-Holy Communion
Breakfast at Canterbury House
10:00 a.m.-Holy Communion
Breakfast at Canterbury House
7:00 p.m.-Evening Prayer
8:00 p.m.-Desert, Folksinging
for New Students

& Gathering

THE CHURCH OF CHRIST

UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
1511 Washtenow Ave.
A. Scheips, Pastor S. Stein, Vicar
Sunday Services-9:45 and 11:15
Sermon: "The Rooted Life'
Bible Class--1:15
Gamma Delta-6:00 p.m, with program fol-
lowing
Wednesday Vespers---- 10:00 p.m.
ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
331 Thompson
NO 3-0557
SUNDAY-Masses at 7:00, 8:00, 9:30, 11:00,
12:00, 12:30.
MONDAY-SATURDAY-Masses of 6:00 a.m.,
6:30, 7:00, 8:00, 9:00, 10:00, 11:00
and 12:00.
WEDNESDAY-7:30 p.m.-Mother Perpetual
Help Devotions. Confessions following.
SATURDAY-Confessions: 3:30-5:00; 7:30-
9:00 p.m.

SUNDAY
9:30 & 11:00 a.m.-Worship Services
7:00 p.m.-Speaker: Prof. George Menden-
hall, Dept. of Near East Studies, "Faith
and'University Study-a Time for Enrich-
ment and Change"

(National Lutheran Council)
Hill St. at S. Forefit Ave.
Pastors: Henry O. Yoder
Norman A. Erikson

LUTHERAN STUDENT CENTER
AND CHAPEL

LOUIS LOMAX, Writer and Lecturer
Author of "The Negro Revolt"
August 28, 1 :30 p.m.
Hill Auditorium
("Viewpoints")
WILL HERBERG, Sociologist and Theologian, Drew University
Author of "Protestant, Catholic, Jew"
October 8, 4:10 p.m.
October 9, 4:10 p.m.
Rackham Auditorium
PAUL TILLICH, Theologian, University of Chicago
October 21, 4:10 and 8:00 p.m.
Rackham Auditorium (4:10)
Michigan Union Ballroom (8:00)
PAUL VAN BUREN, Theologian, Temple University
Author of "The Secular Meaning of the Gospel"
October 27, 8:00 p.m.
October 28, 4:10 p.m.
October 29, 4:10 p.m.
Multipurpose Room, 2nd Floor, Undergrad Library
BRYAN GREEN, Evangelist and Lecturer
Birmingham, England
November 10, 4:10 p.m.
Rackham Auditorium
SEWARD HILTNER, Psychologist and Theologian
Princeton Theological Seminary
November 19, 4:10 p.m.
November 20, 4:10 p.m.
RackhamAuditorium
. EDWIN ORR, Lecturer and Writer
International Christian Leadership
December 1, 4:10 p.m.
December 2, 4:10 p.m.

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W. Stadium at Edgewood
Across from Ann Arbor High
John G. Makin, Minister
SUNDAY
10:00 a.m.-Bible School.
11:00 a.m.-Regular Worship.
6:00 p.m.-Evening Worship.
WEDNESDAY
7:30 p.m.-Bible Study.
Transportation furnished for all
NO 2-2756.

services-Coll

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH

~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~~~~--'~~~~~~~~~~~~

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH CENTER
502 E. Huron
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
512 E. Huron
Fri., Aug. 12-Coffee & Coke Hour at Cam-
pus Center 3:45-4:45
Sun., Aug. 30-9:30 Coffee & donuts at Cam-
pus Center
10:00 a.m.-Worship service - Church
3:45-6:00 p.m.-Picnic - meet at Campus
Center
Tues., Sept. 1-7-8 p.m. -. Freshman Forum
-Campus Center
Paul W. Light, Campus Minister
James H. Middleton, Senior Minister,
First Baptist Church

ZION LUTHERAN CHURCH

1432 Wahtenow Ave.
NO 2-4466
Ministers: Ernest T. Campbell, Malcolm
Brown, Virgil Janssen, John Waser
SUNDAY
Worship at 9:00 and 10:30 a.m.
Presbyterian Campus Center located at the
Church.

1501 W. Liberty St.
Ralph B. Piper, David Bracklein,
Fred Holtfreter, Pastors
Worship Services-8:30 and 11:15 a.m-
Holy Communion - Second Sunday of each
month.
Church School & Adult Bible Class-9:45 a m.
Holy Baotism-First Sunday of month.

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