100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

August 25, 1964 - Image 102

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1964-08-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE SIX

_THE : MICHIGAN DAILY

TTTPqt)'AV- Air'T V'.TTQIV- 9A K'14791

'PA G S ~ *' H E M C H I A N A IL TTT~'Q~ AV A TE'I W'U O~ 1na

u.~ zn.~PILA. xRIJa.LxbZ . 7,0,164

So homores Boost Hockey Hopes For Repeat

TRADITION:
Golfers Rally Following Weak
SStart for Thilrd in Big Ten

(Continued from, Page 1)
on Minnesota proper and lost they
second of the two game series, 6-5.
After that loss Michigan won 12,

games in a row, eight of which
were conference 'games. This tied
the Michigan record for most
consecutive wins.
Loyola of Montreal saw Michi-
gan,'s awesome offensive power
firsthand, as they were ungra-
ciously dumped, .12-1 and 14-2.
The Wolverires then. squared off.
against hockey arch-rival Michi-
gan Tech. 'Michigan -won both
games of the rough, hard-fought
series by scores of 6-2 and 5-3,.
Michigan goalie Bob Gray bested
Tech goalie Gary Bauman in this
series,' as he did in .'five of', the
seven games bewteen the two
schools. Bauman was still re-"
namfed to the All-American team,
however.
In their tiext four games, the
Wolverines averaged 15.25 goals
per game while holding opponents
to one goal a game. The Wolver-
ines topped Colorado 12-4 and 14-
0, smashed Ohio University by an
identical 14-0 score, and then
trounced Ohio State, 21-0.
Spartans Tough
Michigan State was next on the
schedule, and they were disposed
of also, but not without a fight.
Although Michigan won both
nights, 2-0 and 7-2, the games
were well played and tightly con-
tested.
Minnesota came to Ann Arbor
with the same team that had
split with the Wolverines when
they had played in Minneapolis;
however,, Michigan swepttheIse-
ries this time, 6-3 and 8-2.
This pair of victories gave Mich-
igan the little-publicized Big Ten
hockey championship. Although.
this league consists of only four
teams at present, Ohio State,
Michigan State, Minnesota, and
Michigan, Renfrew hopes that it
will expand in the future to a
full ten teams.

Michigan's victory skein was
burst when they ran up against
a fired-up Tech team on Hough-
ton ice. Michigan was dumped
3-1 in the first, of a two-game
series, but fought back to twin
the second game by a close score
of 4-3.
Crucial Series
Although Michigan was the
leader in the WCHA from the very.
beginning of the season, and was,
1n fact, only ousted from that spot
once during the course of the
campaign, the WCHA Champion-
ship was decided in the last home-
and-home series of the season with
Michigan State. Michigan played
some of its best hockey and,
swept a pair from the Spartans
by scores of 9-4 and 13-4.
These victories brought the
WCHA championship to Ann Ar.
bor.
In the WCHA playoffs, which
havefor the past several years
determined the two WCHA teams
that are given bids to the NCAA
championships, Michigan came up
against Michigan Tech for the
third time in the 1963-64 season.'
In the opener, Michigan edged
the Huskies 5-4. The winner of
the series, however, is determined
on the basis of total goals. As a
result, although Tech won the sec-
ond game 5-4' in regulation time,'
a sudden death playoff period
was begun because of the tie in
total goals. The first overtime
went by with neither team be-
ing able to score. It was not un-
til wingman Jack Cole was able
to put in a pass fromGary Butler
at 7:05 of the second sudden death
overtime that Michigan was as-
sured of an invitation to the NCAA
tourney:
Denver Scores
The game with Denver on the
following night was somewhat an-
ti-climactic. The MacNaughton
trophy, which Denver misplaced
en route to Ann Arbor, was to go
to the winner. Denver outplayed
a bruised and tired Michigan
team, winning by a 6-2 margin.

Michigan then journeyed to Den-
ver's home ice for the NCAA hock-
ey championship. In the semifin-
als, Michigan came back in the
third period scoring twice, to win
3-2 over Providence. Thisvictory,
number' 23 for the Blue, set the
stage for a rematch between Den-
ver and Michigan.
In the rematch' the Wolverines
played nearly flawless hockey and
dumped the Pioneers 6-3. This
brought the nation's most coveted
collegiate hockey trophy home to
Michigan for the seventh time.
Although Renfrew spoke often
of the great balance of his three
lines, there were several super-
stars on last year's team.
Assist Mark
Captain Gordie Wilkie set a new
record for assists last season with
a total of 51. This broke his own
record set when he.was a sopho-
more of 36. Wilkie was second
in team scoring with 67 points,
he also won the WCHA scoring
title with 30 points. Wilkie was
voted to the WCHA All-Star
team, the NCAA All-Tournament
team, the All-America team, and
chosen Michigan's Most Valuable
Player. Besides all of these awards,
Wilkie won the Fielding H. Yost
medal and the Big Ten medal for
the scholar-athlete of the year.,
Burly defenseman Tom Polonic
also had numerous honors heap-
ed on 'his shoulders last season.
He was voted to the WCHA All-
Star team, the NCAA All-Tourna-
ment squad, and the All-America
team. In addition, Polonic finish-
ed sixth in conference scoring.
for the season. He was the only
defenseman to finish in :the first
15 scorers.
One of the mainstays of the
Wolverine defense all season was
goalie Bob Gray. Gray set a new
Michigan record for shutouts this
season with four. This mark also
ties the WCHA season high. In
addition, Gray was named to the
NCAA All-Tournament team and
was voted the Most Valuable Play-
er in the tournament. His con-

ference goals-against average was
second only to Buddy Blom's of
Denver.
Leading Scorer
Wingham iGary Butler, who was
WCHA scoring runner-up as a
sophomore, scored 38 goals for
this season to lead the team. in
that department. He bested Wilkie
for the scoring title by one point,
68 to 57.
Cole, the other wing on the
Butler-Wilkie line, put in the key
goal that put Michigan into the
NCAA tournament. In all he hit
the netting for 22 goals and 23
assists for the season.' This total,
gave Michigan's first.line 76 goals
and 104 assists for the season.
Butler, Wilkie, Cole, and Gray
will be lost because of gradua-
tion and conference eligibility
rules this season. In addition, Rog-
er Galipeau, front-line defense-
man, who sat out the last few
games because of a broken cheek-
bone, Ron Coristne, who tallied
38 points, George Forrest,, who
scored 13 points, and substitute
goalie Gary Bieber, who held op-
ponents to 2.5 goals per game in
his six appearances, will be ineli-
gible for play this season.
Martin Leads Veterans
Despite these losses Renfrew has
several starters returning. Wil-
fred Martin, captain-elect, center-
ed the second line last season. He
tallied 34 goals and 24 assists to
finish third in team scoring. He is
regarded very highly by Renfrew
who believes he has the potential
to become one of Michigan's great-
est goal scorers. Also returning is
the third line center, Mel Waka-
bayashi, a junior. Wakabayashi is
one of the Wolverines most color-
ful players. Despite the fact that
he only weighs 150 pounds, Wa-
kabayashi consistently outscrap-
ped the biggest men on the ice.
Pierre Dechaine who began to hit
the nets with increasing regular-
ity as the season progressed will
be on this year's team also. Be-
sides these three, Alex Hood who

was ninth in team scoring; Marty
Read, who scored 19 points, and
Bob Ferguson who tallied 31 points
are all eligible for another season
of play. These six should- provide
the offensive leadership for this
year's team.
Anchors Defense
The defense will be centered
around All-America Tom Polonic
and converted forward Barry
MacDonald who put in 34 points
this past season. Returnees in this
department include Ann Arbor
resident Dave Newton, Rick Day,
who saw more action as the sea-
.son progressed, and Teddy "Bear"
Henderson.
The gaps left in the three lines
will be filled with Renfrew's crew
of sophomores. Renfrew points out
that, "You never know how good
these players will be because they
have had a year's layoff. I be-
lieve that it is important for them
to 'get their marks first, there-'
fore practice is not obligatory for
freshmen. We know what they
have done, and I believe we have
a real'good group of sophomores."
Bob Boysen and Jon Hall, both
All-Staters from Minnesota, will
be contenders for offensive spots
this season. Mike Martilla and
Dean Lucier, both of whom play-
ed on the Detroit Junior Red-
wings, are also out for the team.
Jerry Abel, son of Detroit Red-
wing's Coach-Manager Sid Abel.
is another candidate for a start-
ing ,booth. Other candidates are
Dan Walter, Tom Schiller, defen-
sive standout, and Mark Thomp-
son, another All-Stater from Min-

By STEVE GALL
Michigan's 1964 Golf Team was
up to its old tricks again as it
started weakly in meet competi-
tion but then came on to finish
a strong third in the Big Tenj
Championships at Minneapolis.
Coach Ben Katzenmeyer said, at:
the beginning of the year, "We
have a lot of lettermen with good.
potential, but we're slow in re-
sponding this year." He couldn't
have put it any better, for slow is
exactly the way his. linksters re-
sponded during the course of the
season.
For the second straight year
the Wolverine slammers had dif-
ficulty getting started -as they.
played inconsistently. At a quad-
rangular meet in Columbus they
came in last, scoring 390 to Pur-
due's winning 376. The same er-
ratic play plagued them at Michi-
gan State as they could only mus-
ter- the fourth best score Li five
team competition.
Play Well For Keeps .
Finally, and actually where it
counted, the team hit its peak at
the Conference Championships.!
This was almost a duplicate of
last year's performance which saw
an equally dismal season start but
a strong finish, good enough for'
fourth place in the Big Ten Meet.
Before the Championships, Kat-
zenmeyer predicted that Purdue

Minnesota course upside down in
the first day of competition..
The meet, which is /based on
the lowest total score of the five
best players on each team, has
two days of 36-hole competition.
Two-Stroke Lead
The first two rounds were owned'
by the Blue as they played mag-
nificently, carrying a two strode
lead over favored Purdue. A hap-
py Katzenmeyer said, at this
point, "I've never had a teanm with
more potential, but they've been
asleep all year."
The Wolverine golfers had real-
ly come alive. Sophomore Bill
Newton, former Ann Arbor High
captain, toured the course in blaz-
ing 'rounds of 1-under 70 and 2-
under 69 for a six stroke lead in
the individual medal champion-

ship. His rounds included fourteen
1-putt greens.
Pete Passink, the team's most
consistent golfer, put together
rounds of 72 and 75 for 147 and
a tie for third place. Frosty Eva-
shevski, the football quarterback,
fired a 77 andd72, which included
a fantastic wedge shot dead cen-
ter in the hole, good enough for
an eagle two on the 409-yd. third
hole. Capt. Gary Mouw had a
halfway total of 154 on rounds of
76 and 78.
76 and 78. Sophomore Chuck West
totaled 156 and Senior Tom Clark
shot 161.
Third Round Blues
But now the old culprit, "third
round blues" harassed Michigan
for the second straight year. Just
like last year when they led after
two rounds but then faltered to
fourth, they cooled off again this
year.
Bill Newton, after two great
rounds, staggered to a 78 and 79,
giving him a tie for third place
is the individual championship.
Passink dipped to 73-78--151.
Evashevsk shot two 77's. Captain
Mouwplayed consistently, 79 and
75, West shot to 81-79 and Clark,
whose score did not count fired
second rounds of 81 and 86.'
Now, after such a great start,
Michigan could only show a third-
place finish, thirty strokes off the
pace set by winner Purdue and
Indiana. Yet all was not lost
because the team improved on
its last year's fourth place finish.
Once again the linksters proved
that they can get rough when the
pressure is on.

'eand Minnesota would be the
'senota. teams- to stop. He added, modest-
Sophomore Greg Page, also' a ly. "We've got a crack at it, too."
Minnesota All-State player, will be Little did he know that his play-
working in the nets this season. ers would turn the University of#

BILL NEWTON

a ........................ ...... .......... ,; ......; ...........; .; .; ....:,,,..... Y:rrv: nY: J: w::,av.:. ;..:,Y.Y}..,.o..t a,,...."..... _ ..... ,
..~..~. ..... .......... .J A. ....t.....+r. ,a,
1,: } : :; N:;J { 5:::": {r,; ...:....... .. .5.. ", .. ................. .,......, t,.....................a....... a............1 ,.....a.., ....,r ...,.,.....,...,.... f.r "J
. a;. .. ....................L.....a a..........,.t.. .1.....::.. .ta. ~..a."... J: Y .,atY""
, " .........:r:::.t ......................,....., ......: :"."..,.:.......Y.::..Vr,"::: ",;Y:::.................. ....... ..::5::""."::?':1.,a\.J::J..:."~:'::::^.}rV;.".Y:Jr.1'"i.,"'i4:":,.V.S t{.": 'rr. a".{tt: {o4'iti':::".S{':"::1tsa' ": :':.7L'

Retwoo & Ross

,_4 .

I,

I

THE OLD GRADS- KNOW"
FUN
STARTS AT

TRADITIONAL LOTHING
A message to all students, at Redwood & Ross you will find
AUTHENTIC NATURAL SHOULDER clothing and accessories for
dignified campus wear.

. . _.;

MICHIGAN CAMPUS WEAR
SWEAT SHIRTS
(including special orders for fraternities,
sororities, dorms and clubs)
JACKETS s
'M' BLANKETS
FOR SMALL FRY-Sweat Shirts, Suits, Sweaters, Jackets, Bibs

i
--- ,

SUITS

Redwood & Ross suits are cut along natural tines;
narrow lapels, center hooked vent with plain
front trousers. A, complete variety awaits your
inspection, including cheviots, Coverts, Worsteds,
and Sharkskins-many with vest . . . from 59.50
to 89.50.

I

SPORT COATS

WOMEN'S GYM ATTIRE

SHORTS
BLOUSES
SHOES

ARROWS
BADMINTON BIRDS
SWIM APPAREL

Distinctive separate jackets, fine imported and
domestic woolens. Cut along natural body lines
for correct appearance.' Tasteful colorings, indi-
vidual patterns in new midweight fabrics for
modern comfort... from 29.95 to 55.00.
STOP IN-See your yourself at the Briar Shop!
Convenient Charge Accounts available.

I

PHYSICAL EDUCATION MAJORS' UNIFORMS
ALL GOLF. and TENNIS SUPPLES
FIELD HOCKEY SHOES

MEN'S ATHLETIC SUPPLIES
SHORTS SQUASH RACKETS
REVERSIBLE T-SHIRTS TEAM UNIFORMS
WARM-UP SUITS Complete line of
SHOES for ALL SPORTS TENNIS and
EXERCISERS GOLF .UPPLES
PADDLE BALL PADDLES FENCING EQUIPMENT
HAND BALL GLOVES ISO-KITS

_.r.___,"" .
-
o
o
0
i o
0
a
.
r,
t

I,

WI
~
Whe

INTER SPORTS FUN
SKI JACKETS and PARKAS
STRETCH SKI PANTS
SWISS SKI SWEATERS

"I

SKIS and BINDINGS
SWISS SKI BOOTS
ICE SKATES-MEN and WOMEN'S
an YOU think of FUN-

'E1~d4Ek i~iLUAA~~ A

I

S

r

f I II

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan