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January 16, 1965 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-01-16

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AS ISIx

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, 16 JANUARY 1965

FAGE SIX THE MICHIGAN DAILY SATURDAY, 16 JANUARY 196&

BOILERMA KER'S OPENER:
'M' Tankers Face Young Purdue Squad

Cagers Test Northwestern Sophs
By GIL SAMBERG headed on both halves of the
Just asthe hopes of last year's court. An able defenseman, Tiberi
Wolverine cage quintet lay in theis also considered the best driver
hor n ef qintetslyhi heIon the team and has a, very ac- v
handps o a vintge sohomore curate one-handed set shot.
crop, so does Northwestern bank Court Icing
on its highly touted newcomers n
to bring it back into Big Ten con- If the sophomore group is an
tention when it meets Michigan ideal basketball cake, Glass con-
toni ht at 7:15. EST' sidersJ im Burns the frosting. His v

By JIM LaSOVAGE
The Purdue Boilermakers will
have to do a lot of hard swimming
this afternoon if they are to live
up to their spoiler role against
Michigan's highly rated tankers.
In , fact, Coach Gus Stager is
confident enough of a victory that
he, in a generous move toward
Purdue, is leaving many of his big
guns home to rest. Among these
are Captain Ed Bartsch, Carl
Robie, Bill Croft, Paul Scheerer,
Bill Farley and Bob Hoag. Greg
Shuff and Bruce Brown will also
remain in Ann Arbor, leaving the

diving chores to Tom Ewing and
Bob Walmsley.
Four Lettermen
The 19-man Purdue squad con-
sists of 11 sophomores and only
four returning lettermen. Last
year the Boilermakers managed
only a ninth place finish in the
Big Ten meet under Coach Rich-
ard O. (Pappy) Papenguth, a
Michigan grad.
Harry Wickens is Purdue's
mainstay. In last season's dual
meet against Michigan he took the
only individual Purdue first, in
the 200-yard freestyle, and was

on the winning 400-yard freestyle coach is taking every precaution
relay team. Michigan took the with State's strong team waiting
other nine firsts in the meet. in the wings.

I

Not Only Generosityt
Stager has more reason for leav-
ing swimmers home than just to
keep the score down. He also is
concerned about the health of the
team. In the past week, several
swimmers have had slight colds
or sore throats, and Stager wants
everyone to be in top physical'
condition and health for the
Michigan State meet next Satur-
day. Traveling is an easy way to
pick up a slight illness, and the

The Wolverines will not, how-
ever, be entering Lafayette empty-
handed. Sophomores Tom Wil-
liams, Tom Schwarten, Russ Kin-
gery, H o w i e Brundage, Tom
O'Malley and John Vry enforced
by upperclassmen Bill Spann, Bob
Tanner, Rich Walls, Rees Orland
and Lanny Reppert will carry the
main burden for the tankers, and
unless Purdue introduces a strong
soph team, something like last
year's 77-28 drowning is possible.

fE e
2~fIAN
New Styles
First At Wild's
Don't miss
Our Annual January Sack S ale
If you desire fine traditional styling and workmanship-all wool-in a
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The Wildcats field a starting
five sporting three first-year men
and anchored by junior Jim Pitts
at center and senior captain Don
Jackson at forward.
In addition, Northwestern also
has a coach in his sophomore year
at the school. Larry Glass, who
at 29 is the youngest basketball
coach in the Big Ten, made an
inauspicious debut last season
when his team compiled an un-
inspired 8-13 record.
Michigan Coach Dave Strack is
likely to go with his "big team"
today, in light of last week's win
over Illinois. George Pomey, re-
placing John Thompson at guard,
brings the Wolverines' height to
an average of 6'6". Oliver Darden
also will be a starting forward
as a result of his performance in
the Illini contest. Bill Buntin,
Larry Tregoning and Cazzie Rus-
sell will be at their usual positions.
Soph Troika
The Wildcat's three soph start-
ers are Ron Kozlicki, Walt Tiberi
and Jim Burns. This trio, coupled
with the pair of lettermen, form
the biggest Northwestern line-up
in several seasons.
Kozlicki, a 6'6" 205-pound for-
ward is known for his rugged re-
bounding. His 103 grabs put him
second only to Pitts. The strong
forward has' been averaging 8.6
points per game.
Tiberi is the floor general of
the Wildcats. At 6'1" and 175
pounds, he is quick and cool-

height (6'4") and weight (190)
make him an ideal candidate for
a forward position, but the per-
sonnel situation and his good out-
side shot caused him to be moved
to guard. He is extremely accurate
within 20 feet where his jumper
is hard to stop.
Burns leads Northwestern in
scoring with a 12.1raverage, and
is third in rebounding with 79,
impressive for a guard.
Height and Muscle
While last year's Wildcat team
offered experience in seniors
Marty Riessen, Rick Lopossa, and
Rich Falk, a holder of three school
scoring records, it could boast
little height or muscle to throw
around under the boards. As a
newcomer, Pitts, at 6'8" and 210
pounds, was forced into a starting
role where his height was needed.
Surgery on his left knee had de-
layed his debut as a sophomore
for a year, and the weakness in
his kneesrhas been his achilles
heel during his entire career.
Pitts developed into the 'Cats
top rebounder of recent years,
nabbing an average of 13 per
game before knee injuries side-
lined him for the last five con-
tests. After his final performance
as a sophomore, in which he scor-
ed 23 points and picked off 17
rebounds, the concensus was that
he had finally come into his own
as a first-rate Big Ten center.
Costly Warm-Up
But this season, while warming

CAZZIE RUSSELL AND JIM PITTS will face each other before
many of their Chicago fans when the Wolverines and Wildcats
collide in Evanston's McGaw Hall today. The two were on oppos-

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WELCOME BACK
STUDENTS
Hours
MON .-SAT.
from 8:30-5:30
TO BETTER
SERVE YOU
U-M Barbers
near Kresge's
and-
Dascola Barbers
near Michigan Theater

what about your good resolutions?
plan to attend this sunday
10:30 a.m. ARE YOU TONE DEAF?
7:00 p.m. RENEWAL MOVEMENTS
IN THE CHURCH
Professor Franklin Littell, Ph.D.
Chicago Divinity School
University Reformed Church

ing Chicago Public League high
at Carver and Pitts at Marshall.
up for an early game against
Colorado, Pitts reinjured his left
knee, and even as late as this week
he has been working out with the
painful swelling in his leg.
"But he's better than most cen-
ters right now," says Glass. "And
if he can keep plugging away and
stay in action the rest of the
season and next, Jim is going to1
be one of the great centers in
college basketball, even on one
leg."
Named to the all-tournament
team in the Far West Classic at
Portland, Pitts' defensive play
was compared by coast writers to
that of Bill Russell. And North-
western has established a new
category in statistics for the big
center. It is "Shots Blocked," and
only Pitts' name with 29 in nine
games is listed.
Foul Trouble
Rounding out the Northwestern
starting five is Captain Don Jack-
son at forward. The 6'5", 210-
pound bruiser is an aggressive ball
player who tends to pile up a
cluster of personal fouls. His 58
in last year's Big Ten play was
second only to Tom Van Arsdale's
59.
The most highly-touted of last
year's freshman group was Rich
Mason, a deceptively fast center-

(Cuffed Free)
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school teams as Russell prepped
forward who usually subs for Pitts
when the junior is out of action.
Knee surgery last year was a set-
back to him also, and he is some-
what hobbled at this point in the
season.
What To Do?
But what does a team which
finished sixth in the Big Ten last
year, and enters the sell-out game
with a ,4-7 record-0-1 in con-
ference play-have to do to stop
the second-ranked team in the
nation?
"You've got to run your. of-
fense consistently," explains Glass,
"and take only good shots-ones
with a high percentage of going
in.
"We have to bother their first
shots as much as possible and see
how many times we can prevent
the second, third and fourth shots
they get so often."
Board Duel
Although the Wildcats' team
field goal percentage is .370, they
have outrebounded' their rivals
637 to 555, reminiscent of the
Wolverines' totals.
"They don't dazzle you with in-
tricate plays," Glass said of Michi-
gan's offense. "You know what's
happening and what's going to
happen."
The Wildcats must count tre-
mendously, on the kind of shoot-
ing they got in the second half
of last week's loss to Indiana (20
of 34).
NCAA: Free
Substitution?
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. (-
College football coaches crying for
a return to free and unlimited
substitution may get their wish
next season.
Or, failing that, they may bene-
fit from a compromise rule ending
the undesirable necessity for tak-
ing deliberate penalties to sub-
stitute offensive and defensive
platoons.
The Football Rules Committee
of the National Collegiate Athletic
Association debated for nearly
eight hours yesterday, then threw
out all proposals but two changes
in the substitution rule.
Substitution Choice
One would permit a return to
free substitution that prevailed
prior to 1953. The other would al-
low two substitutions at any time
and switching of platoons when-
ever the ball changed hands.
Committee members met in
secret and were cautioned against
expressing personal opinions on
the outside, but sentiment indi-
cated that the second proposal
would be more likely to succeed.
This rule, Chairman Ivy Wil-
liamson said, would eliminate the
,deliberate delays taken during the
past season to get the defensive
units into the game on fourth
both coaches and fans.
Better Coaching
"It would require more coaching
of offensive teams on punt cover-
age, but it would give the coaches
two platoon football. This will
continue to be a terrific sport,
even if the rules don't satisfy all
the coaches."
Under present rules, free sub-
stitution is allowed between quar-
ters and while the clock is stopped.
A team in a punting situation was
forced to waste a time out or take
a five yard penalty for delay, off-
sides or some other infraction to
bring in its defensive unit.
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